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ONeill:
Any runners out there?

I've been running fairly regularly over the last few months (only 1-2 times a week though). I've done a couple of 10ks but try to run 3-4 miles on training runs at fairly leisurely pace (around 6.5mph). I find that my bpm is around 158-160 at comfortable running but can go up to 178 when running uphill or if running anything up to 8.5mph. In order to keep it around 150 bpm which is at the very top end of my supposed optimum (220-age-60%) I'd need to be barely running/fast walking.

What's the best way to get the bpm down? I've heard of interval training but know little about it. At the minute I'm nowhere near breaking the 50min barrier for a 10k with my best at 55m.

Any help welcome.

Tony Baloney:

--- Quote from: ONeill on June 09, 2009, 09:11:04 PM ---Any runners out there?

I've been running fairly regularly over the last few months (only 1-2 times a week though). I've done a couple of 10ks but try to run 3-4 miles on training runs at fairly leisurely pace (around 6.5mph). I find that my bpm is around 158-160 at comfortable running but can go up to 178 when running uphill or if running anything up to 8.5mph. In order to keep it around 150 bpm which is at the very top end of my supposed optimum (220-age-60%) I'd need to be barely running/fast walking.

What's the best way to get the bpm down? I've heard of interval training but know little about it. At the minute I'm nowhere near breaking the 50min barrier for a 10k with my best at 55m.

Any help welcome.

--- End quote ---
There are so many variables at play when working out your optimal heart rate. As you are using a generic calculation for all people of your age you seem to fall outside the bell curve and can probably run at a faster pace than your calculation is telling.

If I was you I'd go for pace over heart rate - if you can find and maintain a comfortable pace (mph) for the duration of your 10k  then I would ignore the heart rate monitor.

imtommygunn:
As Tony said that's a pretty generic formula. It varies from person to person. There are ways to work out your max heart rate which are considerably more accurate.

http://www.runningforfitness.org/faq/hrmax.php

Look at that - it's a much better way of working it out.

Just going for runs is not the best way to get a 10k time down - it will only get you so far.

Three types of training will get you quicker...
1. Intervals (Reps of x minutes with a break in between with the measure being you should cover the same ground on the first as on the last)
2. Tempo runs (Basically this is fast running however only for a few miles. So at your pace you'd probably want to do ~3 mile in about 26 minutes or so)
3. LSR (Long Slow Runs which for 10ks should be ~70 minutes)

quit yo jibbajabba:
this may also be relevant to my interests;

o'neill, while not actually answering your question, i did a quick google for a 10k training programme; the time to run website has a bit on it for 55min runners to get to sub 50 (the programme seemed a bit complicated, but im not as clever as you) ;)

also, looked at this one; http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_4/138.shtml - maybe useful for beginners like meself;

if i can hijack the thread for a mo'

what is the craic about training at the optimum bpm for weight loss; i just dont get it that by goin relatively easy on eg a cross trainer or treadmill for 20mins, your burnin more fat than if you push it a bit more

imtommygunn:
I've read, though I'm no expert, that a lot of it is related to time so I suppose optimum BPM is to ensure you can exercise for longer.

Apparently for a period of time you'll burn only your "carbs" store and then after a further period of time you'll start burning your fat store.

Slower heart beat = longer training duration = more time in fat burn territory.

Only what I've read but I would reckon it to be true...

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