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Messages - seafoid

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1
i thought the hurlers didnt lack fitness against Waterford ? they weren't playing for each other a totally different thing.

Winning Sam is a nice goal, but i would be happy with instilling a process of continual improvement.

The team haven't improved in the last two years, so i can't see why that would change next year unless something changes.

If some of our best young players don't get good coaching now they may move on and forget about intercounty football.

The hurlers lacked pace though and bite, especially in the middle third when the game was still in the balance. This was obvious in the game against Dublin but not rectified afterwards, a very blatant management failure. Picking Loftus, who's too nice a player and who was replaced v BAC, and Linnane, a practical debutant with a history of leg injuries, was a disaster waiting to happen. Don't agree they didn't play for each other, they combined well enough in the closing stretches; not a lot you can do earlier in the game, on a sweltering day when you're being bossed out of it.
They were also sloppy.

https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/hurling/nicky-english-if-cork-reach-croke-park-it-could-open-up-for-them-1.4629985
"Their touch was poor and they looked very slow. They made numerous mistakes, handling errors, poor distribution and left themselves open to a serious beating from a good team."

They have some psychological issues going back as far as the 2018 all Ireland final. They shouldn't be getting beaten by the likes of the Dubs and the Deise.

2
Steve Hansen to Ireland after NZ beat them again in the RWC.

"Just because you’ve played for a long time, you might not  have learned things you don’t want to learn or you might have learned nothing along the way"

3
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: Today at 10:54:17 AM »
This is interesting

https://www.ft.com/content/2f343703-90c2-4bbc-bbe2-1199f685b9b4

Britain undermines its own case in Northern Ireland Maximalist demands obscure reasonable options for improving the Brexit deal THE EDITORIAL BOARD Add to myFT Loyalists hold a protest against the Northern Ireland protocol and the so-called Irish Sea border at Belfast Harbour earlier this month © Charles McQuillan/Getty Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share on LinkedIn (opens new window) Share Save The editorial board JULY 25 2021 404 Print this page One can hardly blame the EU for a sense of irritation at the latest British effort to relitigate the Northern Ireland protocol of its Brexit deal. This is a mess created entirely by the prime minister. He advocated Brexit without any consideration for its consequences in the province, careless of the point that it was the common membership of the EU that made the Good Friday Agreement possible. He then scuppered a Brexit deal that would have maintained the integrity of the UK. As prime minister he betrayed the very Unionists whose cause he had championed and negotiated a deal that left Northern Ireland in the single market for goods — leaving trade between Britain and the province subject to customs and regulatory checks. Having denied the protocol would lead to a regulatory border between Britain and Northern Ireland, he now proclaims the rules he said did not exist are in fact too onerous to be borne. His latest gambit is to demand substantial renegotiation of the arrangement under the threat of activating a provision allowing the UK unilaterally to abandon certain key provisions of the protocol as they apply to checks on goods moving between Britain and Northern Ireland. Though this threat should be taken seriously, EU officials are understandably unwilling to reward what they see as bad faith by a government trying to relitigate a deal it wishes it had not signed. Brussels has rejected calls for renegotiation of the protocol, though it remains willing to discuss narrow issues to improve the implementation.
 It is understandable if the EU is not feeling terribly charitable towards Boris Johnson or the Democratic Unionist party, which is using the threat of instability to try to recoup lost political ground and unpick a deal they always opposed because its impact (as widely envisaged) will be to pull Northern Ireland’s businesses away from the UK and further into the EU’s orbit. Opinion: David Allen Green: the Northern Ireland Protocol And yet within the maximalist British demands there are some legitimate points. An overzealous EU interpretation of rules is out of proportion to the threat to the integrity of the single market from British goods arriving in Northern Ireland.

 The risk is theoretical rather than real, not least because there is as yet no significant regulatory divergence. Furthermore there are concerns of a future risk to medicine supplies (Northern Ireland is within the NHS) because of the different approval regimes. Likewise the British request for lighter treatment for goods that are destined to stay in Northern Ireland is worth consideration. There are several other issues that can be eased by a more risk-based approach to the protocol.  Brussels can defensibly argue that the UK can remove many problems by signing up to EU sanitary and phytosanitary rules. This conflicts with the UK’s desire for free trade deals, but choosing to prioritise that over a solution is, Brussels might argue, Boris Johnson’s choice.

And yet for all this there is a need to recognise a problem. So while the EU should rightly reject structural changes to its agreement, it does make sense to ask (as it already has in a few areas) whether it cannot be more imaginative in implementing regulations to draw the sting of the most heartfelt and visible grievances. The nation best placed to broker compromise is Ireland, which can only lose from renewed instability in the North. Having fought for the protocol, Dublin is understandably treading a careful line. But if your neighbour’s semi-detached house is on fire, at some point it ceases to be relevant whether or not they started the blaze.

4
hard to know where to go from here, but first off congrats to Mayo and James Horan. Credit to James Horan for his lead in rebuilding this Mayo team, and in fairness to Mayo they have been putting the effort in with the Mayo Coaching plan.

I really think it's time for PJ to go, fundamentally he didn't have much experience in coaching coming into the role and it's showing. He seems to want to be the manager of a Galway team that wins an all ireland, but does he want to be a great coach/manager ? How come he never managed a club team prior to getting the Galway gig ? compared to Horan who has gone on to do a Msc in Coaching and has a couple of stints managing teams.

As a county how can we expect to compete with Mayo when we're not investing the same in s&c as Mayo are ?

I don't want to be slating the county board, but the structures are wrong to me, we're a big dual county like Cork and Dublin, we should have a CEO to run the whole operation. Where does the buck stop? Is it the football committee or the county committee, or in between ? For some reason HQ don't think we need a ceo. imho Gottchse should be promoted to CEO. The last CEO didn't work out, but that's no reason not to appoint another one.

We need a person of the calibre of Lukasz Kirszenstein overseeing an S&C programme, someone who has experience working in a professional sports environment. If it's good enough for the hurlers, why not the footballers ? the s&c coach should be independent of the county manager and they need to be fulltime.
Picking all Ireland winners to manage the county team is hit and miss. Conor Hayes, Noel Lane and Anthony Cunningham all tried with the hurlers but left disillusioned.

5
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/galway-failed-to-reckon-with-fact-that-mayo-always-turn-up-at-croke-park-1.4630169

And so Mayo go through to their 10th All-Ireland semi-final in 11 years.
For a bit of context, consider the fact that before 2011 they had been in 10 All-Ireland semi-finals in the previous 30 years.

6
All due respect to a legend of the game, we have seen nothing that indicates Galway are going to improve from here, will be an absolute dogfight to get back to Div One next year as well.
Not entirely his fault - Galway football problems are of a more systemic nature I feel and outside of a few players a lot of them have just not done it at Senior level - but the cold facts are what they are, Mayo have made a team transition without skipping a beat, people on about all the young players that have started for Galway, the Mayo young lads have come in and are winning, they look absolutely miles ahead in terms of conditioning, attitude and aggression.
Depressing enough really, I don't know do many people even care, if you look at the pathetic fund raising return from earlier in the year, the shambles that is the county website, everything points to a two bob operation.
For the people I see on social media trying to go on about Mayo's failure to land the big one to make themselves feel a bit better about the hames we are in at the moment it makes me cringe.
Mayo are the ones rightly laughing at us, 10 semi finals in 11 years, they are the only show in town West of the Shannon at the top table, Galway have had one good year in twenty and failed utterly to build off the back of that. Expecting some out of nowhere event like 98 to happen again is a Fools errant, we're hopelessly exposed in CP all the time and I've yet to hear a coherent plan about how Galway football is going to be turned around, forget the underage wins, we had those before and made no use of them, what's the plan to get Galway consistently playing in the later stages the Senior Championship?

Not saying it would be a panacea or anything, but one thing I would like to see is a more competitive domestic championship. Corofin's dominance has been a real drag on player development at club level I feel over the past decade and the championship has subsequently been of poor standard. With Moycullen - M/M contesting the most recent final maybe the portents in this area are about to change. It mightn't help our hurling counterparts too much but at least the championship there is of a much higher calibre and helps identify players with county potential.
Crossmaglen's multiple club all Irelands didn't do anything for Armagh.Similar for Athenry and Portumna in the hurling. Or St Thomas' ?
6 teams on a similar level develop over time and can generate a very decent pick.
Sure Galway wouldn't have won in 98 without being beaten by Mayo in 97.
Did Armagh not win an AI in 02 and rake of Ulsters in the noughties with the same stars on both teams- McConville, Belleew etc…
Cross won about 15 county titles after 2003. Armagh won 0 all Irelands during this time.   

7
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/gaelic-football/kevin-mcstay-mayo-firmly-in-the-all-ireland-mix-as-they-prepare-for-defining-test-1.4630842
Afterwards, the stats I got from RTÉ told a bleak tale for the losing team. Galway were destroyed in their long kick-out, winning just 38 per cent. Mayo won 75 per cent of their own long restarts. That is game, set and match. From those possessions Mayo scored 2-8. Why is that happening?
Well, they have one of the best kick-out presses in the game. They force teams to kick long and then they employ the overload, where they can get five or six around the dropping ball. Again, they get there quickly. They cover ground.

It was a 0-11 swing in the second half of a Connacht final. Galway went 30 minutes without a score. They didn’t score from play in the second half. It is a shocking indictment. It ended bizarrely with Mayo’s James Carr tapping a goal chance over the bar as though to spare them embarrassment. I don’t know why he didn’t go for it. He hit a cracking goal down in Limerick in a qualifier against Galway so he has the instinct.

That moment should be the enduring memory of the day for this Galway team. Last thing they want is Mayo sympathy. It is their third successive defeat in a Connacht final. They can’t launch properly until they sort out the backyard. They have had a bad season.
And like a few other counties – Armagh, Donegal – they have to go off this winter and ask the right questions in order to arrive at the correct answers. In a few facets of the game they are well off the standard.

8
All due respect to a legend of the game, we have seen nothing that indicates Galway are going to improve from here, will be an absolute dogfight to get back to Div One next year as well.
Not entirely his fault - Galway football problems are of a more systemic nature I feel and outside of a few players a lot of them have just not done it at Senior level - but the cold facts are what they are, Mayo have made a team transition without skipping a beat, people on about all the young players that have started for Galway, the Mayo young lads have come in and are winning, they look absolutely miles ahead in terms of conditioning, attitude and aggression.
Depressing enough really, I don't know do many people even care, if you look at the pathetic fund raising return from earlier in the year, the shambles that is the county website, everything points to a two bob operation.
For the people I see on social media trying to go on about Mayo's failure to land the big one to make themselves feel a bit better about the hames we are in at the moment it makes me cringe.
Mayo are the ones rightly laughing at us, 10 semi finals in 11 years, they are the only show in town West of the Shannon at the top table, Galway have had one good year in twenty and failed utterly to build off the back of that. Expecting some out of nowhere event like 98 to happen again is a Fools errant, we're hopelessly exposed in CP all the time and I've yet to hear a coherent plan about how Galway football is going to be turned around, forget the underage wins, we had those before and made no use of them, what's the plan to get Galway consistently playing in the later stages the Senior Championship?

Not saying it would be a panacea or anything, but one thing I would like to see is a more competitive domestic championship. Corofin's dominance has been a real drag on player development at club level I feel over the past decade and the championship has subsequently been of poor standard. With Moycullen - M/M contesting the most recent final maybe the portents in this area are about to change. It mightn't help our hurling counterparts too much but at least the championship there is of a much higher calibre and helps identify players with county potential.
Crossmaglen's multiple club all Irelands didn't do anything for Armagh.Similar for Athenry and Portumna in the hurling. Or St Thomas' ?
6 teams on a similar level develop over time and can generate a very decent pick.
Sure Galway wouldn't have won in 98 without being beaten by Mayo in 97. 

9
The Connacht final is what it is but football is weird now. Galway hit rock bottom around 2010 and started a rebuild job that is still ongoing. Mayo have been orbiting the summit since 2012 without getting to do the deed.
 

What is it that ye're building that is going on 11 years without any structure?
It seemed to be going ok until around 2018 but has lost it way since then.
I wouldn't be happy with losing all Irelands either , however. A loss is a loss.
Galway lost 3 in the 70s.

Where have you gone Michael Donnellan? A county turns it's lonely eyes to you.

Bímse buan ar buairt gach ló,
Ag caoi go crua is ag tuar na ndeor
Mar scaoileadh uaim an buachaill beo
Is ná ríomhtar tuairisc uaidh, mo bhrón


10
GAA Discussion / Re: Connacht Senior Football Championship 2021
« on: July 26, 2021, 11:04:51 AM »
The Connacht final is what it is but football is weird now. Galway hit rock bottom around 2010 and started a rebuild job that is still ongoing. Mayo have been orbiting the summit since 2012 without getting to do the deed.
 

What is it that ye're building that is going on 11 years without any structure?
It seemed to be going ok until around 2018 but has lost it way since then.
I wouldn't be happy with losing all Irelands either , however. A loss is a loss.
Galway lost 3 in the 70s.

11
GAA Discussion / Re: Connacht Senior Football Championship 2021
« on: July 25, 2021, 08:26:17 PM »
The Connacht final is what it is but football is weird now. Galway hit rock bottom around 2010 and started a rebuild job that is still ongoing. Mayo have been orbiting the summit since 2012 without getting to do the deed.
 

12
GAA Discussion / Re: Connacht Senior Football Championship 2021
« on: July 25, 2021, 05:42:02 PM »
Mayo move 2 ahead in the eternal competition
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connacht_Senior_Football_Championship#Top_winners
That's 24 ahead of the Rossies

It would be nice if they could turn regional dominance into a Sam.

They've never really dominated the regional stuff bar the 2011-15 era.
5 finals
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_All-Ireland_Senior_Football_Championship_finals#Finals

13
GAA Discussion / Re: Connacht Senior Football Championship 2021
« on: July 25, 2021, 04:24:20 PM »
Mayo move 2 ahead in the eternal competition
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connacht_Senior_Football_Championship#Top_winners
That's 24 ahead of the Rossies

It would be nice if they could turn regional dominance into a Sam. 

14
GAA Discussion / Re: Connacht Senior Football Championship 2021
« on: July 25, 2021, 02:32:51 PM »
"Tá luas ag Shane Walsh". Having the upper hand over Mayo sounds better as Gaeilge.

https://mobile.twitter.com/TheSundayGame/status/1419283894629711877

15
GAA Discussion / Re: Connacht Senior Football Championship 2021
« on: July 25, 2021, 02:22:50 PM »
Presently we look like a team in transition.  :-\
Trans Mayo
Self ID

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