Author Topic: The Official Gaelic (Irish) Translation Thread  (Read 13336 times)

ziggysego

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22419
    • View Profile
    • My Way Access
The Official Gaelic (Irish) Translation Thread
« on: February 29, 2008, 04:04:45 PM »
I'm sure like me, a lot of people here shamefully cannot speak Irish, but needs a word or phrase translated for them. Well I hope some of the Irish speakers on the board would be kind enough to provide help.

I'll start, how do you spell "Happy St. Patrick's Day" in Irish?
« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 04:26:57 PM by ziggysego »
Testing Accessibility

hardstation

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24860
  • On a cold and misty morning on the Anagaire bridge
    • View Profile
    • gaaboard.com
Re: The Official Gaelic Translation Thread
« Reply #1 on: February 29, 2008, 04:06:04 PM »
50p per word.
Also, change the thread title so that it is Irish instead of Gaelic.
« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 04:07:42 PM by hardstation »


ziggysego

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22419
    • View Profile
    • My Way Access
Re: The Official Gaelic Translation Thread
« Reply #2 on: February 29, 2008, 04:07:31 PM »
Can I pay you in kindness?
Testing Accessibility

Zapatista

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5264
    • View Profile
Re: The Official Gaelic Translation Thread
« Reply #3 on: February 29, 2008, 04:07:50 PM »
Spam

I am stating free lesson in the next few weeks. Anyone in the D15 area that wants to come along PM me. Any level Irish, if you can speak some now you will be able to raise the bar and help beginers like me.


hardstation

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24860
  • On a cold and misty morning on the Anagaire bridge
    • View Profile
    • gaaboard.com
Re: The Official Gaelic Translation Thread
« Reply #4 on: February 29, 2008, 04:10:39 PM »
Lesson 1.
St. Patrick's Day -  Lá 'le Pádraig.


Gnevin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5627
  • Jasus!
    • View Profile
Re: The Official Gaelic Translation Thread
« Reply #5 on: February 29, 2008, 04:11:36 PM »
Is this Irish only or will you be translating to Scots Gaelic too?
Anyway, long story short... is a phrase whose origins are complicated and rambling.

Zapatista

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5264
    • View Profile
Re: The Official Gaelic Translation Thread
« Reply #6 on: February 29, 2008, 04:12:42 PM »
I'm sure like me, a lot of people here shamefully cannot speak Irish, but needs a word or phrase translated for them. Well I hope some of the Irish speakers on the board would be kind enough to provide help.

I'll start, how do you spell "Happy St. Patrick's Day" in Irish?

No shame in Ziggy.

AZOffaly

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24968
    • View Profile
Re: The Official Gaelic Translation Thread
« Reply #7 on: February 29, 2008, 04:14:00 PM »
Lesson 1.
St. Patrick's Day -  Lá 'le Pádraig.


Is the " 'le " an abbreviation for Feile?

I thought it was Lá le Feile Pádraig

ziggysego

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22419
    • View Profile
    • My Way Access
Re: The Official Gaelic Translation Thread
« Reply #8 on: February 29, 2008, 04:15:05 PM »
Lesson 1.
St. Patrick's Day -  Lá 'le Pádraig.

Thanks. What about Happy? :)
Testing Accessibility

heganboy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3877
  • well hello there!
    • View Profile
Re: The Official Gaelic Translation Thread
« Reply #9 on: February 29, 2008, 04:21:13 PM »
ziggy,
change the thread title, gaelic is the english word for the football we play and the name of a language spoke in scotland. The name of the language in english is "Irish"
Never underestimate the predictability of stupidity

hardstation

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24860
  • On a cold and misty morning on the Anagaire bridge
    • View Profile
    • gaaboard.com
Re: The Official Gaelic Translation Thread
« Reply #10 on: February 29, 2008, 04:32:56 PM »
Is this Irish only or will you be translating to Scots Gaelic too?
Lamh Dhearg Alba will do this for you.

Almost, AZ. Except I would have Lá na Féile Pádraig or Lá Fhéile Pádraig. Lá 'le Pádraig is an abbreviation of the latter.

Lesson 2.
Instead of happy, I would use the word maith, meaning good. Although some would use the word Sona, meaning happy.

Stay tuned for lesson 3


cicfada

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 568
    • View Profile
Re: The Official Gaelic (Irish) Translation Thread
« Reply #11 on: February 29, 2008, 04:33:24 PM »
Lá Fhéile Phadraig...................shortened to Lá le Pádraig!!

AZOffaly

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24968
    • View Profile
Re: The Official Gaelic (Irish) Translation Thread
« Reply #12 on: February 29, 2008, 04:35:08 PM »
So I elongated it instead of abbreviating it :) Class.

So what is happy St. Patrick's Day then?

Lá 'le Pádraig maith duit?

What's the Beannachtai (sp) La le Padraig?

hardstation

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24860
  • On a cold and misty morning on the Anagaire bridge
    • View Profile
    • gaaboard.com
Re: The Official Gaelic (Irish) Translation Thread
« Reply #13 on: February 29, 2008, 04:39:44 PM »
Lesson 3.
To wish someone a Happy St. Patrick's day, I would use Go raibh at the beginning of the sentence and add agat (if saying it to one person) or agaibh (more than one) at the end.
In full, Go raibh Lá 'le Pádraig maith agat (agaibh).

Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig - St. Patrick's day blessings.


hardstation

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24860
  • On a cold and misty morning on the Anagaire bridge
    • View Profile
    • gaaboard.com
Re: The Official Gaelic (Irish) Translation Thread
« Reply #14 on: February 29, 2008, 04:58:51 PM »
Homework for Monday:
The person with the best essay wins an easter egg.

'Cuir síos ar an caidreamh atá ann, idir Babaí Mháirtín agus Cearrbhach Bhéití, san úrsceal An Caislean Óir.'

400 words.