Author Topic: Brexit.  (Read 373580 times)

lenny

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5685 on: Today at 06:13:07 PM »
A Hard Border is a bit of a bogeyman, very unlikely to see any physical infrastructure, it'll be a technical border if it comes to it. The UK has repeatedly said it won't man any border and can't be compelled to by the EU in a no deal situation, the ball will be in the EU / Ireland's court if that particular chicken comes home to roost.

You're listening to kate hoey and david davis a bit too much ie idiots. If it's a hard brexit or no deal there will definitely be a hard border with infrastructure. There's no way of avoiding it.
Who is going to build it when both sides have clearly said it can't or won't happen? A solution will be found if and when the actual problem presents itself. It's as likely as Trump's Mexican wall.

lol, youíre very naive. Why do you think thereís a backstop at all then? Itís there to prevent a hard border which the people at the coal face of the negotiations knew would be inevitable if there was jo agreement.

Smokin Joe

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5686 on: Today at 06:47:02 PM »
Benny,
I posted this 2 days ago.  This is why we would have to have a hard border (even if everyone says they don't want one):

Here is a little scenario that clearly sets this out.

Let's pretend that the UK (inc NI) leaves the Customs Union as they want to strike even better trade deals around the world; this after all was one of the drivers towards Brexit.

The UK enter into a Free Trade Agreement with Orangestan (a country somewhere far beyond the EU).  In this FTA the UK can export stuff tariff free to Orangestan and Orangestan can export their oranges tariff free to the UK; again this is the Holy Grail of Brexit.

Compare this with the EU, who has an import tariff of 10 pence on each orange imported from Orangestan.  So the Brexiteers were correct; they were able to negotiate better trade deals with Orangestan than the EU were able to.

Orangestan can deliver their oranges either to the port of Belfast or Dublin and the price, before duties, is £1 (Orangestan like sterling so they sell in GBP to all customers across the world!).
The price that Northern Ireland fruit wholesalers pay for the oranges are £1, while the price that the ROI fruit wholesales pay is £1.10. The 10 pence difference is due to the differential in tariffs.

Imagine there is no border.

What do we think will happen?

The oranges from Northern Ireland are likely to find their way over the border into the ROI because the NI oranges could be sold in the ROI at £1.05.  This gives a profit to the people who had access to NI oranges, whilst at the same time ensuring that the ROI customer is making a saving on the price of the official duty paid product.
The greengrocers in Monaghan, Cavan and Donegal will see a reduction in their orange sales due to the inevitable smuggling of oranges.  Soon the Northern Irish oranges find their way further south and this smuggling issue gets Leo Varadkar's attention.

The ROI greengrocers are up in arms because their orange sales have disappeared and import duties are not being properly assessed and paid over.

The Irish Government is faced with no choice, they have to install a manned border so that they can stop the orange smuggling route so that the Irish greengrocers can continue to make their living.

I appreciate that the above story may seem simplistic, but understanding this makes it very clear that the UK government is going to find it very difficult to actually get any sort of Brexit deal approved as Northern Ireland is such a burden on GB's desire to be free of the EU.

So think of this when we hear politicians saying that we need to negotiate a better deal with no NI backstop.  It is just not possible; unless NI remains forever in the Customs Union - and it's difficult to see the British Parliament voting for that.

Gabriel_Hurl

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5687 on: Today at 09:06:47 PM »
She survives again



hardstation

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5688 on: Today at 09:08:48 PM »
She survives again



Thatís far from a win.


screenexile

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5689 on: Today at 09:10:59 PM »
She survives again



Thatís far from a win.

Nothings a f**king win the whole thing is a shitshow... peoples vote is the only way to get a consensus on this!

trailer

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5690 on: Today at 09:15:17 PM »
I'd just love to know what the geniuses on here would think Corbyn can do. Or should do. His opponents are tearing themselves apart over an issue created by them for no good reason. Should he risk the exact same thing happening to his own party by coming up with a plan that he cannot implement at present as he's in opposition? I don't understand the logic here. Labour need to get back into power. Things will be better for everyone bar the Boris Johnson/Jacob Rees Mogg brigade when this happens.

The opposition is supposed to be a Government in waiting. Thon front bench is a disgrace. They have no clear deliverable vision on Brexit. Their view should be a peoples vote, but Corbyn is that much of a left wing looney he won't support that. Abbott, McDonnell et al are un-electable as a Government.
What should Corbyn do? Lead or leave!

May limps on. Nothing changes. No support for the deal. A GE is highly unlikely, a 2nd referendum seems to be the only way forward. Hopefully Labour get their act together if that's the case.
 

sid waddell

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5691 on: Today at 09:43:39 PM »
I'd just love to know what the geniuses on here would think Corbyn can do. Or should do. His opponents are tearing themselves apart over an issue created by them for no good reason. Should he risk the exact same thing happening to his own party by coming up with a plan that he cannot implement at present as he's in opposition? I don't understand the logic here. Labour need to get back into power. Things will be better for everyone bar the Boris Johnson/Jacob Rees Mogg brigade when this happens.
Corbyn's plan is completely unimplementable.

And I say that as somebody who was very enthusiastic about his general left-wing agenda.

But his Brexit strategy is pure unicorns in the sky stuff.

He's worse than May on the issue.

dec

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5692 on: Today at 09:46:14 PM »
peoples vote is the only way to get a consensus on this!

There was a peoples vote.

That's what got us into this mess in the first place.

imtommygunn

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5693 on: Today at 09:47:18 PM »
Agreed on corbyn sid.

While may is useless i had real fears either mogg or johnston could get power. I think they would be an absolute disaster for this place both economically and in terms of peace.

Over the Bar

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5694 on: Today at 10:08:01 PM »
Agreed on corbyn sid.

While may is useless i had real fears either mogg or johnston could get power. I think they would be an absolute disaster for this place both economically and in terms of peace.

Neither Rees-Mogg or Fuckwit Boris would win a leadership vote. 2 stalking-horses who back in the day after a failed challenge would now be on their way to the tour to get disemboweled.  May is weak but has more support that either of those two racist fantasy-boys.