Author Topic: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE  (Read 4028 times)

Fear Bun Na Sceilpe

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #30 on: November 21, 2020, 08:09:38 PM »
Continuing on this note there is an excellent programme on bbc iplayer called ď hawkes and doves ď
By Michael portillo on the British government response to the war of independence.
Reality is that the 6 county North was predetermined before the negotiations started.
Portillo quite good at these type of shows.

Interesting that they discussed the possibility of a 4 county NI which excluded Tyrone and Fermanagh, but they felt a statelet that small was economically unsustainable (Not that itís economically booming these days).

Would they consider reducing NI even further to hold a Protestant majority if needed? After all, as far as Iím aware, only Down and Antrim have unionist majorities.

One of their biggest mistakes was leaving west bank of Derry city (which is Inishowen effectively) in the North. Caused them untold trouble. They done it because of historical significance of walls and seige

armaghniac

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #31 on: November 23, 2020, 03:13:34 PM »
Continuing on this note there is an excellent programme on bbc iplayer called ď hawkes and doves ď
By Michael portillo on the British government response to the war of independence.
Reality is that the 6 county North was predetermined before the negotiations started.
Portillo quite good at these type of shows.

Interesting that they discussed the possibility of a 4 county NI which excluded Tyrone and Fermanagh, but they felt a statelet that small was economically unsustainable (Not that itís economically booming these days).

Would they consider reducing NI even further to hold a Protestant majority if needed? After all, as far as Iím aware, only Down and Antrim have unionist majorities.

One of their biggest mistakes was leaving west bank of Derry city (which is Inishowen effectively) in the North. Caused them untold trouble. They done it because of historical significance of walls and seige

I see this map today in Slugger for Freestate proposals for the border, this would have rid the 6 counties of Derry and south Armagh and would have saved a lot of trouble.


If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

Main Street

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #32 on: November 23, 2020, 08:25:12 PM »
Monaghan would have become  the super power in Ulster GAA after liberating and taken into protection  all the Cs,  the bandit towns of  Crossmaglen, Cregan, Culloville and Cullyhanna.

armaghniac

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #33 on: November 23, 2020, 08:29:31 PM »
Monaghan would have become  the super power in Ulster GAA after liberating and taken into protection  all the Cs,  the bandit towns of  Crossmaglen, Cregan, Culloville and Cullyhanna.

Well their postal address was Monaghan before the sectarian Post Office administration made us Down.
And you might welcome Camlough as well.
If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

Main Street

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #34 on: November 23, 2020, 08:35:28 PM »
I think Camlough was outside of Monaghan's reach, possibly it would have sunk into the mire of Louth.

BennyCake

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #35 on: November 23, 2020, 09:53:29 PM »
If Armagh was split with the border, surely the whole county would still be just ĎArmaghí? Or would it become Northern Armagh and The Armagh Free State?

Main Street

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #36 on: November 23, 2020, 10:15:15 PM »
If Armagh was split with the border, surely the whole county would still be just ĎArmaghí? Or would it become Northern Armagh and The Armagh Free State?
One Armagh is enough.

The Hill is Blue

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #37 on: November 24, 2020, 12:18:14 PM »
In the last few days I learned of an interesting connection between the Maamtrasna murders and the Bloody Sunday massacre.

In 1882 in Maamtrasna on the Galway and Mayo border five members of the Joyce family were murdered in their beds. One of the young sons, Martin, survived because he was out of the house on the night of the murders. Some years later Martin was married and settled in Dublin where he had a large family. Two of his sons Joe and Christy played football with Parnells (Stephen Cluxton's club). On Bloody Sunday both Joe and Christy were on the Dublin team which was caught up in the massacre.

And of course the great Johnny Joyce who scored six goals for the Dubs in a Leinster championship game against Longford in 1960 was a grandson of Martin Joyce.
I remember Dublin City in the Rare Old Times http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9T7OaDDR7i8

brokencrossbar1

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #38 on: November 24, 2020, 02:14:03 PM »
If Armagh was split with the border, surely the whole county would still be just ĎArmaghí? Or would it become Northern Armagh and The Armagh Free State?
One Armagh is enough.

FRSA....Free Republic of South Armagh with Cross as the capital. Would would stand alone and make our money as a sovereign smuggling state akin to Andorra!

BennyCake

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #39 on: November 24, 2020, 03:45:54 PM »
Continuing on this note there is an excellent programme on bbc iplayer called ď hawkes and doves ď
By Michael portillo on the British government response to the war of independence.
Reality is that the 6 county North was predetermined before the negotiations started.
Portillo quite good at these type of shows.

Interesting that they discussed the possibility of a 4 county NI which excluded Tyrone and Fermanagh, but they felt a statelet that small was economically unsustainable (Not that itís economically booming these days).

Would they consider reducing NI even further to hold a Protestant majority if needed? After all, as far as Iím aware, only Down and Antrim have unionist majorities.

One of their biggest mistakes was leaving west bank of Derry city (which is Inishowen effectively) in the North. Caused them untold trouble. They done it because of historical significance of walls and seige

I see this map today in Slugger for Freestate proposals for the border, this would have rid the 6 counties of Derry and south Armagh and would have saved a lot of trouble.




Iím assuming they took Derry so they could use the cityís docks for access to the North Atlantic.

But why did they go with Tyrone then? Was it because they knew there was gold in them thar hills? And Fermanagh, sure what could they possibly want with it?

If the Brits left out Tyrone, surely it would have been easier for them to manage the border along the Blackwater and Lough Neagh?

Main Street

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #40 on: November 24, 2020, 06:52:42 PM »
Continuing on this note there is an excellent programme on bbc iplayer called ď hawkes and doves ď
By Michael portillo on the British government response to the war of independence.
Reality is that the 6 county North was predetermined before the negotiations started.
Portillo quite good at these type of shows.

Interesting that they discussed the possibility of a 4 county NI which excluded Tyrone and Fermanagh, but they felt a statelet that small was economically unsustainable (Not that itís economically booming these days).

Would they consider reducing NI even further to hold a Protestant majority if needed? After all, as far as Iím aware, only Down and Antrim have unionist majorities.

One of their biggest mistakes was leaving west bank of Derry city (which is Inishowen effectively) in the North. Caused them untold trouble. They done it because of historical significance of walls and seige

I see this map today in Slugger for Freestate proposals for the border, this would have rid the 6 counties of Derry and south Armagh and would have saved a lot of trouble.




Iím assuming they took Derry so they could use the cityís docks for access to the North Atlantic.

But why did they go with Tyrone then? Was it because they knew there was gold in them thar hills? And Fermanagh, sure what could they possibly want with it?

If the Brits left out Tyrone, surely it would have been easier for them to manage the border along the Blackwater and Lough Neagh?
Nobody wanted Tyrone, so I suppose it just stayed there.

GaillimhIarthair

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #41 on: November 24, 2020, 09:52:28 PM »
In the last few days I learned of an interesting connection between the Maamtrasna murders and the Bloody Sunday massacre.

In 1882 in Maamtrasna on the Galway and Mayo border five members of the Joyce family were murdered in their beds. One of the young sons, Martin, survived because he was out of the house on the night of the murders. Some years later Martin was married and settled in Dublin where he had a large family. Two of his sons Joe and Christy played football with Parnells (Stephen Cluxton's club). On Bloody Sunday both Joe and Christy were on the Dublin team which was caught up in the massacre.

And of course the great Johnny Joyce who scored six goals for the Dubs in a Leinster championship game against Longford in 1960 was a grandson of Martin Joyce.
Wow, I thought I knew that Maamtrasna story well but never heard of that Bloody Sunday & Gaa link previously - thanks for posting that info. 

The Hill is Blue

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #42 on: November 25, 2020, 03:28:29 PM »
In the last few days I learned of an interesting connection between the Maamtrasna murders and the Bloody Sunday massacre.

In 1882 in Maamtrasna on the Galway and Mayo border five members of the Joyce family were murdered in their beds. One of the young sons, Martin, survived because he was out of the house on the night of the murders. Some years later Martin was married and settled in Dublin where he had a large family. Two of his sons Joe and Christy played football with Parnells (Stephen Cluxton's club). On Bloody Sunday both Joe and Christy were on the Dublin team which was caught up in the massacre.

And of course the great Johnny Joyce who scored six goals for the Dubs in a Leinster championship game against Longford in 1960 was a grandson of Martin Joyce.
Wow, I thought I knew that Maamtrasna story well but never heard of that Bloody Sunday & Gaa link previously - thanks for posting that info.

Yes it's a fascinating connection.

I knew that Johnny Joyce was a grandson of Martin Joyce who survived the Maamtrasna massacre, but I didn't know that two of Martin's sons were on the field on Bloody Sunday. At the moment, by coincidence, I'm reading The Maamtrasna Murders by Margaret Kelleher and she mentions the Bloody Sunday connection in her book.

I live close to Kilbarrack Cemetery in Fingal where Martin Joyce is buried (a long way from Maamtrasna).



       
I remember Dublin City in the Rare Old Times http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9T7OaDDR7i8

GaillimhIarthair

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Re: Bloody Sunday Documentary on RTE
« Reply #43 on: November 25, 2020, 04:28:36 PM »
In the last few days I learned of an interesting connection between the Maamtrasna murders and the Bloody Sunday massacre.

In 1882 in Maamtrasna on the Galway and Mayo border five members of the Joyce family were murdered in their beds. One of the young sons, Martin, survived because he was out of the house on the night of the murders. Some years later Martin was married and settled in Dublin where he had a large family. Two of his sons Joe and Christy played football with Parnells (Stephen Cluxton's club). On Bloody Sunday both Joe and Christy were on the Dublin team which was caught up in the massacre.

And of course the great Johnny Joyce who scored six goals for the Dubs in a Leinster championship game against Longford in 1960 was a grandson of Martin Joyce.
Wow, I thought I knew that Maamtrasna story well but never heard of that Bloody Sunday & Gaa link previously - thanks for posting that info.

Yes it's a fascinating connection.

I knew that Johnny Joyce was a grandson of Martin Joyce who survived the Maamtrasna massacre, but I didn't know that two of Martin's sons were on the field on Bloody Sunday. At the moment, by coincidence, I'm reading The Maamtrasna Murders by Margaret Kelleher and she mentions the Bloody Sunday connection in her book.

I live close to Kilbarrack Cemetery in Fingal where Martin Joyce is buried (a long way from Maamtrasna).



       
Well, I'm a long way from Kilbarrack Cemetery but grew up not too far from Maamtrasna!!

A tragic story with an amazing connection to Bloody Sunday all the same.