Author Topic: There's an elephant in the room.  (Read 4621 times)

Fionntamhnach

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Re: There's an elephant in the room.
« Reply #45 on: January 15, 2020, 09:59:31 PM »
The elephant in the room is that we have thousands of civil servants in safe jobs pushing paper around and not doing anything particularly productive.  Anyone working in frontline education can verify that.  Plus, sadly many families expectations are a life on welfare and many people are actively trying to get disability diagnosis to secure benefits.  Harsh truth which no one dare speak publicly of.  Therefore the North will continue to be riddled by self-inflicted financial waste of taxpayers money, with absolutely no prospect of the parties having the desire or balls to challenge it.

I obtained a disability diagnosis nearly a decade ago (well into adulthood) not with the main idea of being able to obtain benefits, but rather to (a) help give myself protection and aid when it came to employment matters, and (b) to have a formal medical result for my bigger picture physically, mentally and emotionally - this is hard to describe how much it means. The main problem is that my diagnosed disability has no obvious physical signs, so far too many idiots think there's nothing wrong with me at all.  >:(

Also as regards to the "harsh truth", persons applying for PIP are entitled to benefits wherever they are working or not. You can be working 40 hour weeks and still get the high rate of both components of PIP - this should not be confused with ESA or its replacement within the scope of Universal Credit, which all ESA claimants in NI are expected to be transferred across to within the next 2-3 years. ESA is means tested for those applying via income support.

As to the public sector in the north, I've mentioned this several times before - whilst the percentage of the workforce in NI employed in the public sector in higher than down south, or across in Scotland, England or Wales, the general amount of people that are considered employed in the public sector per head of population in NI is only marginally higher the UK average. Granted, the last figures I have at hand were for the beginning of the last decade, but it's only within the last 3 to 4 years that the NICS has went on an administration recruitment drive after a freeze in 2008 and in that time, some governmental departments that had their own NI based service have been merged with their GB counterparts, the main one being the DVA, while the reduction of councils from 26 to 11 has seen the redundancy of some overlapping roles in local government. Indeed, the % of the NI workforce employed in the public sector has been steadily going down (it might now be <30%, which would be in terms of percentages less than that for Norway, for example) over the last three decades. What makes the NI economy appear public-sector dominated overall is not so much that it is massively bloated compared to its neighbours, but that the private sector is consistently weak, with few large businesses that are either  native & strongly export-led, or are major multinational bases, both of whom tend to be the big economic drivers in todays world - there are plenty of SME's but in terms of their value productivity they don't have, worker for worker, the same economic impact. Also, I've worked in the NICS before (and in the private sector as well as self-employed), and in my experience some element of reform is needed but it is an utterly lazy generalisation that everyone's a paper pusher or a dosser - there's certainly a few "swinging the led" but in my experience, aside from a very small amount that take the piss and seem untouchable, it's no worse than many large private-sector businesses of similar employment sizes in terms of some workers not pulling their weight with the rest having to pull them along. The smaller the business, the less easy it becomes to hide your flaws or laziness to your employer or fellow employees and thus easier to be told to buck up or lose out.
"I can't be arsed any more; too much ignorance, bigotry, dogma, idiocy & retreat from reason"

Tony Baloney

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Re: There's an elephant in the room.
« Reply #46 on: January 15, 2020, 10:27:15 PM »
Fionn you are right that people swing the lead in many organisations but in my company (several thousand people) if you were at the shite I hear about in the silly service you'd be out the door. Difference we have is no unions defending the indefensible.

Fionntamhnach

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Re: There's an elephant in the room.
« Reply #47 on: January 15, 2020, 10:42:49 PM »
Fionn you are right that people swing the lead in many organisations but in my company (several thousand people) if you were at the shite I hear about in the silly service you'd be out the door. Difference we have is no unions defending the indefensible.
There are some large businesses that tend to be good at spotting dossers reasonably fast and dealing with them - they tend to have a lot of delegation amongst its management levels, and micromanagement is usually unheard of. Others though, not so much. Similarly a few Civil Service & local government departments are quite adept at weeding out workers not bucking up or else, but there is unfortunately a culture elsewhere where it is let pass - resistance to moving towards online services being a notable one. Overall, there's good an bad in private, public & "third" sectors in my experience.
"I can't be arsed any more; too much ignorance, bigotry, dogma, idiocy & retreat from reason"