Author Topic: A question for the over 50s  (Read 2426 times)

seafoid

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2019, 12:26:45 PM »
Pat Spillane said that a lot of the 1982 team would have retired if they won the 5 in a row. 

They were tired in 1983 and deservedly lost to Cork, even if it was a late minute goal that beat them. 

By 1984, Pat says they were fresh again and won "three  handy titles" (his words), although Monaghan in 1985 semi-final took them to a replay.

At the dinner after the 1980 semi-final victory over Offaly, a team member said in a group conversation that Offaly are the best up and coming championship team and Kerry's next loss would probably be to them.  He was right.
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Hound

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2019, 02:21:16 PM »
I watched a bit of the Seamus Darby game on GAA Go this weekend.

It’s shocking how the quality of the football has changed. Even in such a showcase game, featuring all-time elite players, it was all lumping it up the field in the general direction of the forwards, with constant turnovers in possession. No value on possession or accurate passing to a man in space. Not saying the players weren’t good - they’d be elite today also having undergone the physical, skills and tactical training modern players do, but the game itself was just so primitive.

So similar to how hurling is played now?

Keyser soze

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2019, 03:44:41 PM »
I watched a bit of the Seamus Darby game on GAA Go this weekend.

It’s shocking how the quality of the football has changed. Even in such a showcase game, featuring all-time elite players, it was all lumping it up the field in the general direction of the forwards, with constant turnovers in possession. No value on possession or accurate passing to a man in space. Not saying the players weren’t good - they’d be elite today also having undergone the physical, skills and tactical training modern players do, but the game itself was just so primitive.

When people look st back at today's game in 40 years time no doubt they will find it primitive as well. 

playwiththewind1st

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2019, 04:07:39 PM »
If it's still even being played at that stage.

J70

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #19 on: September 02, 2019, 04:14:06 PM »
I watched a bit of the Seamus Darby game on GAA Go this weekend.

It’s shocking how the quality of the football has changed. Even in such a showcase game, featuring all-time elite players, it was all lumping it up the field in the general direction of the forwards, with constant turnovers in possession. No value on possession or accurate passing to a man in space. Not saying the players weren’t good - they’d be elite today also having undergone the physical, skills and tactical training modern players do, but the game itself was just so primitive.

So similar to how hurling is played now?

Yes. I don't really watch hurling these days, but that was definitely the case when I did.

J70

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #20 on: September 02, 2019, 04:15:45 PM »
I watched a bit of the Seamus Darby game on GAA Go this weekend.

It’s shocking how the quality of the football has changed. Even in such a showcase game, featuring all-time elite players, it was all lumping it up the field in the general direction of the forwards, with constant turnovers in possession. No value on possession or accurate passing to a man in space. Not saying the players weren’t good - they’d be elite today also having undergone the physical, skills and tactical training modern players do, but the game itself was just so primitive.

When people look st back at today's game in 40 years time no doubt they will find it primitive as well.

Perhaps. but they'll still be able to distinguish it from the hit-and-hope stuff of the earlier days.

Keyser soze

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2019, 04:28:45 PM »
I watched a bit of the Seamus Darby game on GAA Go this weekend.

It’s shocking how the quality of the football has changed. Even in such a showcase game, featuring all-time elite players, it was all lumping it up the field in the general direction of the forwards, with constant turnovers in possession. No value on possession or accurate passing to a man in space. Not saying the players weren’t good - they’d be elite today also having undergone the physical, skills and tactical training modern players do, but the game itself was just so primitive.

When people look st back at today's game in 40 years time no doubt they will find it primitive as well.

Perhaps. but they'll still be able to distinguish it from the hit-and-hope stuff of the earlier days.

All sports are forever evolving, all generations are smugly self congratulatory that they have reached a peak of performance that is at a new level in comparison to how it was done in the past.  A couple of examples are the revolutionary new approach by Down in the 60's which was surpassed by the Golden football of Kerry in the 70's and then again by the Puke Football Tyrone era of the Noughties which has  been passed out by the Dublin evolution, which will of course be in turn surpassed by the next phase of development. 

thewobbler

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #22 on: September 02, 2019, 04:42:49 PM »
Based on soccer it won’t evolve too much from here, unless forced by rule change.

It took 10 years after frees from hands became allowed, before teams began to favour possession over territory. It took another 10 years before counter attacking (ultra defensive) football became prominent. Dublin are a hybrid of those concepts.

Managers from here will bounce between these tactical approaches depending on what they have at their disposal. And a few will even favour territory over possession, when suitable ball winning forwards are available.

Rufus T Firefly

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #23 on: September 07, 2019, 09:56:44 AM »
I’m a little too young to remember Kerry’s dominance. Was it like this in the early 80s too? Although that Kerry team have subsequently (and rightly) been immortalised in popular culture, match day attendances would suggest that football was at a low ebb in terms of popularity. Also has anyone the clarity of mind to remember if the press and pundits spent their days complaining about unfair advantages. Or were we not as cynical then?

My recollection was that there was an apathy generated by the Kerry dominance. As an example, our All Ireland semi-final with Kerry in 1982 was one of the lowest attendances ever for such a game. The official attendance was just over 17,000 and I recall that that was made up of almost exclusively Armagh fans, with Kerry supporters and neutrals giving it a miss.

There was no talk about unfair advantages, save for the fact that Munster was deemed to be an easy route to an All Ireland semi-final, with 1980 (where Kerry were placed in a Munster Final) seen as an example of that.

Kerry were simply deemed to have a great set of players and a great manager. Kerry had players who were reckoned would walk on to any team in Ireland but rarely saw Championship action with Kerry. Vincent O'Connor was one such player and I remember a lad called John L. McElligott (sp?) running riot against us in the '82 league semi-final, yet he never seemed to feature in the Championship.

When Kerry would be beaten in the league, the common interpretation was that they were not doing anything of serious note until the Championship and that they were not taking the league seriously.

When they were beaten in '82 and '83, there was also a sense that they were unlucky to a degree, conceding very late goals, and the subsequent three-in-a-row seemed to bear that out. I remember the '83 semi-finals between Cork and Dublin had a real sense of something new and refreshing.

However when Cork beat Kerry in a replay in Killarney in '87 there was a definite sense of the end of an era. 


dec

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #24 on: September 08, 2019, 11:06:14 PM »

When Kerry would be beaten in the league, the common interpretation was that they were not doing anything of serious note until the Championship and that they were not taking the league seriously.


When they changed from the old north/south split in the National League to a single divison one in 1980, Armagh got to play Kerry in Lurgan and hammered them. It did feel good to beat the All Ireland champions even if it felt that the result would be different in the championship.

Rufus T Firefly

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #25 on: September 09, 2019, 09:44:39 AM »
When they changed from the old north/south split in the National League to a single divison one in 1980, Armagh got to play Kerry in Lurgan and hammered them. It did feel good to beat the All Ireland champions even if it felt that the result would be different in the championship.

Yes, finished something like 1-17 to 2-5. I think that match might have been all ticket - 17,000 if my memory serves me well - as that was the first time Kerry had crossed the border.

We beat them again in Davitt Park and I recall we scored six goals, with Johnny Corvan and Mickey McDonald to the fore.


Championship though was a different matter! 


passedit

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #26 on: September 09, 2019, 10:50:19 AM »
When they changed from the old north/south split in the National League to a single divison one in 1980, Armagh got to play Kerry in Lurgan and hammered them. It did feel good to beat the All Ireland champions even if it felt that the result would be different in the championship.

Yes, finished something like 1-17 to 2-5. I think that match might have been all ticket - 17,000 if my memory serves me well - as that was the first time Kerry had crossed the border.

We beat them again in Davitt Park and I recall we scored six goals, with Johnny Corvan and Mickey McDonald to the fore.


Championship though was a different matter!

I was in Davitt Park for that game and the story was the entire Kerry team spent the night before in James Mc Cartan's pub in Donaghcloney. Allegedly it took several strong men to carry the Bomber to bed!

Also remember there being a Hunger Strike demonstration at half time.
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BennyCake

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #27 on: September 09, 2019, 12:17:29 PM »

When Kerry would be beaten in the league, the common interpretation was that they were not doing anything of serious note until the Championship and that they were not taking the league seriously.


When they changed from the old north/south split in the National League to a single divison one in 1980, Armagh got to play Kerry in Lurgan and hammered them. It did feel good to beat the All Ireland champions even if it felt that the result would be different in the championship.

Sure the League was only a ball-stealing exercise for Micko. The Kerry bus probably headed back over the border with a half dozen of smuggled Armagh balls!

Rossfan

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2019, 12:40:18 PM »
This may be an urban myth but Bomber Liston is supposed to have said
"People think playing for Kerry is all about football and beer. It is not. Some of us haven't kicked a ball for 6 months"
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armaghniac

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Re: A question for the over 50s
« Reply #29 on: September 09, 2019, 01:32:44 PM »
When they changed from the old north/south split in the National League to a single divison one in 1980, Armagh got to play Kerry in Lurgan and hammered them. It did feel good to beat the All Ireland champions even if it felt that the result would be different in the championship.

Yes, finished something like 1-17 to 2-5. I think that match might have been all ticket - 17,000 if my memory serves me well - as that was the first time Kerry had crossed the border.

We beat them again in Davitt Park and I recall we scored six goals, with Johnny Corvan and Mickey McDonald to the fore.


Championship though was a different matter!

I was in Davitt Park for that game and the story was the entire Kerry team spent the night before in James Mc Cartan's pub in Donaghcloney. Allegedly it took several strong men to carry the Bomber to bed!

Also remember there being a Hunger Strike demonstration at half time.

I have no doubt that Kerry had a nice weekend, winning wasn't an important part of it. However, I did hear that they had overnighted in Monaghan, which seems extremely plausible, and Armagh had sent a few retired stalwarts to buy them drinks.
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