Author Topic: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar  (Read 15998 times)

marty34

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #45 on: August 06, 2019, 09:22:27 AM »
Bas size seems to be self-regulating. Too big and it becomes unwieldy, too small and the striking/carrying surface is too small. I'm not sure what problem you're trying to solve by micromanaging the Bas size.

Is it unwieldy for the goal keeper?

A little bit, but that's the trade-off goalies make for a larger surface to stop shots. A keeper's hurley wouldn't be practical for the other players on the field who spend more time swinging.

Yeah, shot stopping wouldn't be the key area for keepers nowadays.  All about picking the ball up aou around the goals and for striking.  Shot stopping is down the list.

You need to stay off the glue marty, too early in the morning for that shite.

Don't take my word for it. David Herrity told me that last year....but I'll bow to YOUR greater knowledge.

hardstation

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #46 on: August 06, 2019, 11:24:43 AM »
Watch: Laois 'keeper Rowland scores from a puckout
http://hoganstand.com/Article/Index/302465

If we can't have a heavier sliotar we'll have to extend the pitches !
You’ll always get the odd goalkeeper with a tremendous dig. Pat Gallagher of St Johns in Antrim scored a point from a puck out in a club game at Corrigan Park in the mid 90s. He regularly rained ball on the opposition goalmouth. I remember speaking to a clubmate of his who complained that he drove the ball wide far too often.
The ball isn’t having a negative impact on the game so it would be silly to change it.


manfromdelmonte

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #47 on: August 06, 2019, 03:42:18 PM »
Bas size seems to be self-regulating. Too big and it becomes unwieldy, too small and the striking/carrying surface is too small. I'm not sure what problem you're trying to solve by micromanaging the Bas size.

Is it unwieldy for the goal keeper?

A little bit, but that's the trade-off goalies make for a larger surface to stop shots. A keeper's hurley wouldn't be practical for the other players on the field who spend more time swinging.

Yeah, shot stopping wouldn't be the key area for keepers nowadays.  All about picking the ball up aou around the goals and for striking.  Shot stopping is down the list.
a goalie in hurling shouldn't have to save a one on one shot

seafoid

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #48 on: December 10, 2019, 01:51:37 PM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/hurling/yellow-sliotar-set-to-be-used-in-2020-hurling-championship-1.4110652

Yellow sliotar set to be used in 2020 hurling championship
Reports suggest new ball has passed tests and now just needs approval from Central Council

A yellow sliotar is set to be used in next year’s hurling championship once it is approved at Central Council next month.

A report in the Irish Examiner says an exhaustive eight-year process has led to the expected introduction of the new ball which will incorporate a microchip in its core, allowing officials to scan the ball with a smartphone to ensure it is fit to use.

The ball has been tested in DCU and has also been trialled the last two stagings of the Super 11s as well as the Celtic Challenge in the US.

GAA seeing the light on the new yellow sliotar
With approval now expected at next month’s Central Council meeting, the ball will likely come into use when the Leinster and Munster, Joe McDonagh, Christy Ring, Nicky Rackard and Lory Meagher Cup competitions begin in May.

The ‘smart sliotar’, produced by Kilkenny company Greenfields Digital Sports Technology, will come as a welcome initiative to many who have called for a different colour ball to make it more visible, similar to changes made a number of years ago in tennis.

Speaking on RTÉ earlier this year, Donal Óg Cusack called for a change.

“Tennis used to have a white ball and they changed for really good reasons, some of those being TV,” he said.

“We see now the demographic in Ireland is changing. If someone is watching the game on television and they can’t follow the sliotar it’s a turn off straight away whereas, a luminous ball is much easier to see and it’s scientifically proven that your eye will react faster to it.”
Lookit

Fear Bun Na Sceilpe

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #49 on: December 10, 2019, 01:58:39 PM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/hurling/yellow-sliotar-set-to-be-used-in-2020-hurling-championship-1.4110652

Yellow sliotar set to be used in 2020 hurling championship
Reports suggest new ball has passed tests and now just needs approval from Central Council

A yellow sliotar is set to be used in next year’s hurling championship once it is approved at Central Council next month.

A report in the Irish Examiner says an exhaustive eight-year process has led to the expected introduction of the new ball which will incorporate a microchip in its core, allowing officials to scan the ball with a smartphone to ensure it is fit to use.

The ball has been tested in DCU and has also been trialled the last two stagings of the Super 11s as well as the Celtic Challenge in the US.

GAA seeing the light on the new yellow sliotar
With approval now expected at next month’s Central Council meeting, the ball will likely come into use when the Leinster and Munster, Joe McDonagh, Christy Ring, Nicky Rackard and Lory Meagher Cup competitions begin in May.

The ‘smart sliotar’, produced by Kilkenny company Greenfields Digital Sports Technology, will come as a welcome initiative to many who have called for a different colour ball to make it more visible, similar to changes made a number of years ago in tennis.

Speaking on RTÉ earlier this year, Donal Óg Cusack called for a change.

“Tennis used to have a white ball and they changed for really good reasons, some of those being TV,” he said.

“We see now the demographic in Ireland is changing. If someone is watching the game on television and they can’t follow the sliotar it’s a turn off straight away whereas, a luminous ball is much easier to see and it’s scientifically proven that your eye will react faster to it.”

Good idea

marty34

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #50 on: December 10, 2019, 04:32:09 PM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/hurling/yellow-sliotar-set-to-be-used-in-2020-hurling-championship-1.4110652

Yellow sliotar set to be used in 2020 hurling championship
Reports suggest new ball has passed tests and now just needs approval from Central Council

A yellow sliotar is set to be used in next year’s hurling championship once it is approved at Central Council next month.

A report in the Irish Examiner says an exhaustive eight-year process has led to the expected introduction of the new ball which will incorporate a microchip in its core, allowing officials to scan the ball with a smartphone to ensure it is fit to use.

The ball has been tested in DCU and has also been trialled the last two stagings of the Super 11s as well as the Celtic Challenge in the US.

GAA seeing the light on the new yellow sliotar
With approval now expected at next month’s Central Council meeting, the ball will likely come into use when the Leinster and Munster, Joe McDonagh, Christy Ring, Nicky Rackard and Lory Meagher Cup competitions begin in May.

The ‘smart sliotar’, produced by Kilkenny company Greenfields Digital Sports Technology, will come as a welcome initiative to many who have called for a different colour ball to make it more visible, similar to changes made a number of years ago in tennis.

Speaking on RTÉ earlier this year, Donal Óg Cusack called for a change.

“Tennis used to have a white ball and they changed for really good reasons, some of those being TV,” he said.

“We see now the demographic in Ireland is changing. If someone is watching the game on television and they can’t follow the sliotar it’s a turn off straight away whereas, a luminous ball is much easier to see and it’s scientifically proven that your eye will react faster to it.”

Totally agree with this - will take a bit of time for players to get used to it but will be a success.  About time in fairness!

Be great for a game under lights although hurling/camogie shouldn't be played under lights in my opinion.

I wonder will they change the football to yellow in the next few years? Anybody agree?

lenny

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #51 on: December 10, 2019, 06:46:50 PM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/hurling/yellow-sliotar-set-to-be-used-in-2020-hurling-championship-1.4110652

Yellow sliotar set to be used in 2020 hurling championship
Reports suggest new ball has passed tests and now just needs approval from Central Council

A yellow sliotar is set to be used in next year’s hurling championship once it is approved at Central Council next month.

A report in the Irish Examiner says an exhaustive eight-year process has led to the expected introduction of the new ball which will incorporate a microchip in its core, allowing officials to scan the ball with a smartphone to ensure it is fit to use.

The ball has been tested in DCU and has also been trialled the last two stagings of the Super 11s as well as the Celtic Challenge in the US.

GAA seeing the light on the new yellow sliotar
With approval now expected at next month’s Central Council meeting, the ball will likely come into use when the Leinster and Munster, Joe McDonagh, Christy Ring, Nicky Rackard and Lory Meagher Cup competitions begin in May.

The ‘smart sliotar’, produced by Kilkenny company Greenfields Digital Sports Technology, will come as a welcome initiative to many who have called for a different colour ball to make it more visible, similar to changes made a number of years ago in tennis.

Speaking on RTÉ earlier this year, Donal Óg Cusack called for a change.

“Tennis used to have a white ball and they changed for really good reasons, some of those being TV,” he said.

“We see now the demographic in Ireland is changing. If someone is watching the game on television and they can’t follow the sliotar it’s a turn off straight away whereas, a luminous ball is much easier to see and it’s scientifically proven that your eye will react faster to it.”

Totally agree with this - will take a bit of time for players to get used to it but will be a success.  About time in fairness!

Be great for a game under lights although hurling/camogie shouldn't be played under lights in my opinion.

I wonder will they change the football to yellow in the next few years? Anybody agree?

Ah ffs if anybody can’t see a size 5 they need to go to the opticians.

Milltown Row2

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #52 on: April 26, 2020, 03:26:54 PM »
Was watching the 95 semi final there, Clare v Galway.

This talk of a heavier ball as they score more now than them, nonsense, the style and skill level contributed to low scoring along with poorer stick work, while ground hurling and flicks were the rage then it wasn’t fluent enough!

Though it didn’t lack heart which is still aplenty when these teams meet up.
Anything I post is not the view of the County Board!! Nobody died in the making of this post ;-)

Bord na Mona man

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #53 on: May 11, 2020, 12:19:00 PM »
Watching the older games more closely, it looks like the sliotar hasn't changed that much after all. Keepers like Ger Cunningham or Niall Patterson could virtually hit the ball the length of the field 30 years ago. Outfield players could drive it far at various times.
The biggest change has been the hurleys. The 'sweet spot' is bigger now. In previous years the hurley was shaped more to suit ground hurling, which lead to far more mis-hits and poor connections out of the hand. This is the biggest reason there was lots of 30 and 40 metre clearances. Under any pressure at all, a player generally hit the ball but didn't get great purchase on it.

Add to that, players are technically better and fitter nowadays. Far less one-sided players, in game fatigue not such a factor, players more likely to move the ball to a spare player instead of striking under pressure. Everyone numbered 5 to 15 is expected to pop it over the bar from half way if they get a look at the posts.

If you want to increase the ball-in-play time and reduce everyone shooting on sight, simply introduce negative scoring. A team gets docked a point for every 4 wides they hit.

hardstation

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #54 on: May 11, 2020, 12:36:10 PM »
Ffs, things are bad enough without us ending up on -10.


imtommygunn

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #55 on: May 18, 2020, 06:43:01 PM »
Watched Galway tipp from 87 or 88. There were some tough boys on that Galway team. Linnnane, finnerty, keady, mcinerney. You wouldn’t have messed with any of them in a hurry in their prime. Hayes and Coleman not far behind either.

Kidder81

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #56 on: May 19, 2020, 08:52:14 PM »
Watched Galway tipp from 87 or 88. There were some tough boys on that Galway team. Linnnane, finnerty, keady, mcinerney. You wouldn’t have messed with any of them in a hurry in their prime. Hayes and Coleman not far behind either.

Finnerty was the best of them all in my opinion

Milltown Row2

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #57 on: May 20, 2020, 09:17:38 AM »
Watched Galway tipp from 87 or 88. There were some tough boys on that Galway team. Linnnane, finnerty, keady, mcinerney. You wouldn’t have messed with any of them in a hurry in their prime. Hayes and Coleman not far behind either.

Finnerty was the best of them all in my opinion

Agreed on Finnerty, but so many players on that team would favour a fan based on their styles

The 89 semi final they lost against Tipp was one that got away that would have been what that team deserved, Tipp blew them away early doors but Galway steadied the ship second half. Brendan Lynskey had an injury leading into the game and was dropped, came on and turned the game, should have started imo, fit for the bench fit to start and all that!
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didlyi

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #58 on: May 23, 2020, 02:01:08 PM »
Watching the older games more closely, it looks like the sliotar hasn't changed that much after all. Keepers like Ger Cunningham or Niall Patterson could virtually hit the ball the length of the field 30 years ago. Outfield players could drive it far at various times.
The biggest change has been the hurleys. The 'sweet spot' is bigger now. In previous years the hurley was shaped more to suit ground hurling, which lead to far more mis-hits and poor connections out of the hand. This is the biggest reason there was lots of 30 and 40 metre clearances. Under any pressure at all, a player generally hit the ball but didn't get great purchase on it.

Add to that, players are technically better and fitter nowadays. Far less one-sided players, in game fatigue not such a factor, players more likely to move the ball to a spare player instead of striking under pressure. Everyone numbered 5 to 15 is expected to pop it over the bar from half way if they get a look at the posts.

If you want to increase the ball-in-play time and reduce everyone shooting on sight, simply introduce negative scoring. A team gets docked a point for every 4 wides they hit.

Agree its more to do with technique and hurleys than sliothar weight. But for me its the man in space that will put the ball over the bar from the other end of the field not the man under pressure. And the hand pass has been perfected to the point that delivering to a man in space is a lot easier than 30 years ago. Reducing the number of handpasses would reduce that opportunity and give the opposition a better chance of defending the pass and the score. More stick passing would be more attractive too.

johnnycool

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Re: Hurling Needs a heavier sliotar
« Reply #59 on: May 26, 2020, 08:26:21 AM »
Watching the older games more closely, it looks like the sliotar hasn't changed that much after all. Keepers like Ger Cunningham or Niall Patterson could virtually hit the ball the length of the field 30 years ago. Outfield players could drive it far at various times.
The biggest change has been the hurleys. The 'sweet spot' is bigger now. In previous years the hurley was shaped more to suit ground hurling, which lead to far more mis-hits and poor connections out of the hand. This is the biggest reason there was lots of 30 and 40 metre clearances. Under any pressure at all, a player generally hit the ball but didn't get great purchase on it.

Add to that, players are technically better and fitter nowadays. Far less one-sided players, in game fatigue not such a factor, players more likely to move the ball to a spare player instead of striking under pressure. Everyone numbered 5 to 15 is expected to pop it over the bar from half way if they get a look at the posts.

If you want to increase the ball-in-play time and reduce everyone shooting on sight, simply introduce negative scoring. A team gets docked a point for every 4 wides they hit.

Agree its more to do with technique and hurleys than sliothar weight. But for me its the man in space that will put the ball over the bar from the other end of the field not the man under pressure. And the hand pass has been perfected to the point that delivering to a man in space is a lot easier than 30 years ago. Reducing the number of handpasses would reduce that opportunity and give the opposition a better chance of defending the pass and the score. More stick passing would be more attractive too.

The pitch in Croke Park is longer now than it was back then, almost 10 metres longer IIRC.

Back then the ball was made of a cork core wrapped in cotton thread which in a dry day was dead on but in the wet was a tonne weight.