Author Topic: Hurling Championship 2019  (Read 21297 times)

seafoid

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2019, 02:39:48 PM »
Clare 6 ahead at HT in Ennis
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marty34

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #16 on: May 12, 2019, 03:07:01 PM »
Clare 6 ahead at HT in Ennis

In Waterford?

manfromdelmonte

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2019, 05:51:08 PM »
Tipp are back
Still think their backs hit too many hail mary balls up the field

Capt Pat

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2019, 06:10:58 PM »
A good win today for Clare in Waterford. Clare were in control for most of the game but Waterford came on strong in the end and were close to stealing it.

Tip looked strong in taking care of Cork in pairc ui caoimh today. Cork and Waterford have it all to do now after losing their home games.

AZOffaly

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #19 on: May 12, 2019, 10:00:25 PM »
Tipp are back
Still think their backs hit too many hail mary balls up the field

In fairness not as many. The second goal was a case in point. Paudie trundled out  the field and was winding up for the Hail Mary but you could nearly see him catching himself. Instead he played a sensible pass 50 yards into bubbles who squared for John McGrath. There were a fair few instances  of that.

manfromdelmonte

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2019, 10:20:29 PM »
How was Walter not shown a red card?
Kilkenny upped the physicality

Some of the hurling is now lawless and referees don't bother blowing the whistle

johnnycool

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #21 on: May 13, 2019, 10:49:00 AM »
How was Walter not shown a red card?
Kilkenny upped the physicality

Some of the hurling is now lawless and referees don't bother blowing the whistle

Tis a many game (c) Eddie Keher, Kilkenny.


seafoid

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #22 on: May 13, 2019, 11:21:02 AM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/hurling/more-questions-than-answers-as-galway-go-again-1.3886380

More questions than answers as Galway go again
Beaten finalists will embark on All-Ireland campaign without Joe Canning
Sat, May 11, 2019, 06:00
 
Keith Duggan

 
Galway players reflect at the end of last season’s All-Ireland defeat to Limerick. Photograph: Tommy Dickson/Inpho

 
On a fresh day in February, Dublin came to Salthill for the stiffest test of their league campaign. What unfolded didn’t surprise Mattie Kenny.
“That is the standard we have to get to,” he said in the corridors within Pearse Stadium after watching Galway post 1-20 and cruise past Dublin, who were stuck on 1-11 at the end. It was formidable fare from Galway who have thrived in the unfashionable neighbourhood of Division 1B: just four wides over the afternoon, an eye-catching show from Cathal Mannion at midfield and a powerful, bustling forward performance from Seán Bleahene.
“Galway are All-Ireland champions from last year and they are the best side in Ireland,” Kenny continued, before checking himself as if remembering what had happened in September. “If not, then one of the top two sides.”
Dublin absorbed the lessons fast and put together an impressive league, topping the division. Galway was their sole defeat. They are such popular dark horses for a big championship say that they are not really dark horses at all. But the forecasts for Galway’s summer would puzzle even the most astute meteorologists. Kenny’s assessment remains correct: they are among the top two sides in Ireland. In flow, they look unbeatable. But will they achieve that flow?
In February, Johnny Glynn was in New York. He is back. Joseph Cooney was in Australia then. He is back and thundered into the local championship with Sarsfields. Micheál Donoghue used the league to give as many players as many opportunities as he could.
Epic defence
If Galway learned anything over the course of an epic defence of their All-Ireland last summer, it’s that they were stretched for depth at the crucial part of the season. It was a useful spring, but if an underwhelming semi-final exit against Waterford was a minor concern then the significant injury suffered by Joe Canning in that match leaves several question marks hovering over the squad.
Anyone who enjoys Irish sport will hope that the Portumna man, 30 years old now, will regain fitness in time to play a part in this championship. But the imprecise length of his recovery time complicates the various challenges facing Galway as they attempt to return to the All-Ireland final for the third successive year.
 Do Galway they hang their hat on Johnny Glynn’s aerial threat?
Who becomes the figurehead of the team in Canning’s absence? Can they return to the defensive pack-mentality of 2017? Can they achieve such consistency for a third successive year? Do they hang their hat on Glynn’s aerial threat?
In 2017, Galway won the All-Ireland scoring just two goals along the way; last summer they hit 12. But just four of those came at the pinnacle of the championship - two in two games in the semi-final against Clare and two in that riveting eight minutes of injury-time against Limerick.
It was goals that propelled the Treaty county to the title: three against Cork in the semi-final and another three that kept Galway chasing throughout that final. What kind of goal threat will Galway present this summer?
These are among the challenges facing the team ahead of their opening game in Salthill against Carlow on Sunday afternoon.
“Well, the first major challenge is to play and perform to their full potential,” says former All-Ireland winner and coach Noel Lane.
High intensity
“To do that, training must have a very high intensity by all involved. Injuries must be managed. We all know Joe has had a serious injury and is looking at a 14 to 16 week break. And I think that for Galway’s management challenge that the panel accepts that and raises their game and gets on with it.
“Even the management of it by Joe, who is doing everything he can to regain fitness and all of that and to remain mentally tough and hope that maybe later in the year that he will be able to contribute something. But in the meantime it’s important that other players accept this and move on and step up to the plate. They are going to have to achieve a high physical and mental strength because small margins in those areas - skill levels, physical strength - will be critical.”
The 2018 final will be remembered as a thriller because of those nail-biting eight minutes of added time. The nerve-wracking end has disguised how fiercely Galway had to chase the game: 1-15 to 0-10 down after 50 minutes, 2-15 to 0-13 down after 62 minutes; 3-15 to 0-16 down after 71 minutes.
 Micheal Donoghue and selector Noel Larkin at the end of the last year’s final. Photograph: Tommy Dickson/Inpho
That they managed to reduce the final score to a point was a combination of their relentless belief and a young Limerick team trying to land the county’s first All-Ireland since 1973. If the Galway hurling fraternity was disappointed after the day, it felt different to previous losses.
“The euphoria of winning the thing in 2017 meant that supporters in general knew Galway hadn’t become a bad team overnight,” Lane points out. “A few things didn’t go right. And the other thing that contributed to there not being much criticism is the fact that it was Limerick, who were superb last year and great champions. They punished mistakes Galway made severely. So the disappointment was huge but there was a sense that this team could come back.”
Lane played on the last Galway team to appear in three consecutive finals; Galway won two of four appearances between 1985 and 1988. Galway appeared in three consecutive finals on three other occasions: 1979-81 and 1923-25.
Big year
“That was a very good team but the championship wasn’t as competitive then so it’s not comparing like with like,” he says of the 1980s side. “The whole game- the mental approach and preparation and the science of the game has moved to a different level.”
When Canning appeared at a launch last week, he was inevitably asked about when he would return to maroon colours and was necessarily ambivalent in his replies. The truth is that he doesn’t know. The presumption that Galway would just automatically appear in the All-Ireland quarter final series, scheduled for July 13/14th, left him wary. “How do we know if we’re even going to get out of Leinster?” he asked. “I’m not even thinking about that.”
His reticence is understandable. But there is a good reason why the Galway hurling championship is suspended indefinitely. A big year beckons. Their All-Ireland quest begins with the low-altitude visit of Carlow, who achieved a famous 0-20 apiece draw against Galway in the league.
After that, the pace will quicken quickly. Everyone knows the class and power within this Galway squad. How all of that potency is unleashed during Canning’s indefinite absence will be fascinating to observe through the furious early stages of the championship.

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redsetanta

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #23 on: May 13, 2019, 03:38:59 PM »
Great game in O'Connor Park on Saturday evening. It's a sad state of affairs when there wasn't even 2 minutes of highlights on the Sunday game.
The real glory is being knocked to your knees and then coming back. That's real glory. VinceLombardi

burdizzo

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #24 on: May 13, 2019, 04:39:30 PM »
Was there 30 seconds?

redsetanta

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #25 on: May 13, 2019, 04:49:01 PM »
I don't recall seeing anything at all. Maybe TG4 will have something this evening.
The real glory is being knocked to your knees and then coming back. That's real glory. VinceLombardi

burdizzo

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2019, 09:01:35 PM »
Did I miss it - or was it on before the Munster minor football between Clare and Tipperary?! Puh.

seafoid

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #27 on: May 17, 2019, 10:32:20 AM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/hurling/jackie-tyrrell-waterford-s-summer-in-danger-of-being-over-before-it-starts-1.3894745

Jackie Tyrrell: Waterford’s summer in danger of being over before it starts
Like Clare, Tipperary’s pace and movement could cause major problems for Déise men
about 4 hours ago
 
Jackie Tyrrell

 
I was sitting in the RTÉ studio in Páirc Uí Chaoimh on Sunday stuffing my face with Jelly Tots and watching Clare play Waterford on the screen in front of us. I asked myself the question – which of those two forward lines would I prefer to be playing against as a defender?
Now, maybe it was the sugar in the Jelly Tots that was making me energetic and ballsy in the first place – I’m 37 next month so the correct answer is obviously neither of them, because I’m well past it. But if I really had to, part of me still had a notion I could survive somehow on some of the Waterford forwards.
Even if that’s nonsense, it’s not a good sign for the Waterford attack that the thought would enter my head. There was just such a huge contrast between their forward division and Clare’s that it set me thinking. Walsh Park is one of the tightest pitches in the country and still Clare were able to create so much space in so many different areas.
Clare defenders coming out with the ball always had options. Their shape and set-up has evolved to suit their players. They have pace and movement and there was method and electricity every time the ball entered that half of the field. All the Jelly Tots in the world wouldn’t have made me think I could survive in that scenario.
You can’t fault the full back for losing Conlon – he did the right thing, blocking the point and fighting for the ball

By comparison, when I looked at the Waterford attack, I saw patterns of movement and ball delivery that seemed manageable for opposition defenders. Shane and Stephen Bennett were making predictable runs a lot of the time – out towards the sideline to balls that were sent diagonally away from goal. That’s not a bad option on the face of it but if you keep repeating it, a top intercounty defender is going to come alive to it very quickly.

Pauric Mahony spent most of his day tracking David Fitzgerald’s runs back into his own half. Mikey Kearney never got on top in his duel with Jack Browne, Peter Hogan didn’t feature at all really. Outside of Austin Gleeson, they had no real threat or presence.

When Maurice Shanahan came on, he was dynamic and caused problems in the air. He caught one ball and got fouled for a 20-metre free. He caught another and scored a point of his own. That at least was asking a different question of the Clare defenders, but when it comes right down to it, Maurice didn’t touch the ball until the 70th minute when Waterford were five points down. It was very comfortable for the Clare defence up to then.
Go back to the Waterford defence and ask them what sort of afternoon they had and comfortable wouldn’t come into it. They were constantly being moved around and each Clare player presented them with a different problem.
Podge Collins dropped deep when Clare didn’t have the ball but bombed back up to support when they had. John Conlon roamed from the square to the wing for puck-outs but made sure he was inside as a target man the rest of the time. Shane O’Donnell played everywhere and couldn’t be harnessed. The sum total of all that movement was confusion – just look at Conlon’s goal for the perfect example of that.
Donal Tuohy’s puck-out landed down on the edge of the Waterford D and there was a scrap for possession with four Clare forwards converging on the scene – Conlon, Podge, O’Donnell and Peter Duggan. Each of them brought their man with them and Tadhg de Búrca got in around it too, meaning that when the ball hit the ground, nine players were bunched about 25 metres from goal halfway between the D and the sideline.
O’Donnell had started as the closest player to the Waterford goal but he sprinted towards the scene, followed closely by Noel Connors. What this all meant was that a huge acre of space opened up in front of the Waterford posts. Because O’Donnell is so sharp at getting the ball into his hand, he was the one who came out of the bunch with it and straight away, Conlon sprinted into the open space.
Waterford nearly got away with it too because unusually for him, O’Donnell didn’t look up to see was there a goal on and instead went for his own point. If he’d scored it, I’d say Conlon would have had a few words for him. But what actually happened was that Conor Prunty pulled off a great block and as O’Donnell went to pick up the loose ball, Prunty chased him for it.
 John Conlon of Clare challenges for possession with Waterford’s Conor Prunty during the Munster SHC round-robin game at Walsh Park. Photograph: Ryan Byrne/Inpho
You can’t fault the full back for losing Conlon – he did the right thing, blocking the point and fighting for the ball. Waterford’s problem was that three other defenders all went chasing the ball too and nobody copped that if Prunty was battling with O’Donnell, then Conlon must be loose somewhere.
It was Conlon’s speed of thought and rapid movement that killed them, along with O’Donnell’s ability to get the ball into his hand in a tight space. It looked like a bad goal to give away because Conlon found himself in so much space. But the constant movement of the Clare forward line is designed to create that space. The question for Waterford is what are they doing to create similar space up the other end?
I measure a forward’s movement very simply – when a defender looks up as he comes out with the ball, the forward should have his mind made up for him where to deliver it. Indecision is a no-no in a high-intensity championship game so a good forward takes the possibility of indecision out of his team-mate’s mind. His first job is to make the out ball obvious.
This is a two-stage process. First you have to make the space, then you have to time your run into it. Hold your run, leave the space open, make two, three or four dummy runs laterally to create separation and then explode into the space at the moment the man in possession strikes the ball.
As a defender, you can track and shadow a forward’s movement comfortably enough for up to five or six seconds. After that, it starts to become increasingly difficult. The combination of the physical output and the mental focus needed to keep an eye both on your man and on where the ball is all adds up. The really good forwards know this and they almost try to wear you out by running at around 75 per cent of their max pace for those five or six seconds.
Waterford need to create more and better space with intelligent runs and find some variation
As you fatigue trying to shadow them, they then lean into you at the moment of breakaway. In the NFL, you see wide receivers getting penalised for pushing off their defenders as they go to catch the ball – in hurling, the poor corner back has no such luck. The really good forwards use you as leverage and push away from you, getting into a full sprint out to the ball.
The good ones might only need one or two dummy runs. If you’re at a game over the coming weeks, watch how Aaron Gillane, Shane O’Donnell or Séamus Callanan do it. They are the market leaders in this field. All they need is a yard or two. Once they’ve created space and separation, you know you’re in trouble because these lads don’t mis-control the ball. By that stage, you’re just hoping for the best.

Watching that game on Sunday, I counted at least four instances in the first half alone where Pat O’Connor and David McInerney won that foot race for possession with the two Bennetts. But if their movement had been dynamic enough, it wouldn’t have come down to a foot race. The hard running comes before the ball is pucked in.
Waterford’s other problem was that they didn’t have enough variety. The Clare defenders had so many options when they looked up. They could pop it short to Tony Kelly in a midfield pocket of space. They could go long and high to Conlon in the square or Duggan down the wing. They could puck it any way possible to O’Donnell and he’d make something of it. Or they could run it through the lines with Kelly, Fitzgerald and Colm Galvin all a factor.

All that said, you have to admire Waterford for staying in it. Even if the scoreboard flattered them in the end, they were never dead in the game and there’s a lot to be said for that.
When you dig down into the numbers and stats, you see that Waterford were efficient with the ball. They had 66 possessions, 36 shots created, 22 scores. They scored eight points from frees and only had eight wides, two of them from sideline balls. Those are actually decent enough performance numbers, all in all.
Where they fell down was in penetration and possession inside in the danger zone beyond the 20-metre line. Stephen Bennett had a glorious chance of a goal in the first half but couldn’t control the ball. Over the course of the afternoon, they didn’t get a score inside the Clare 20-metre line. That’s not going to cut it from here on out.
Definitely not this weekend in Thurles. They’re heading to play Tipperary who are buoyant and in a mean mood and if they don’t get a result, the year could be over for them. Tipperary scored 2-28 on Sunday, 2-24 from play. Everyone from number five to 15 got on the scoresheet. More importantly, their inside line John McGrath, Callanan and Jason Forde scored 2-10 (2-7 from play).
Waterford have a huge job ahead of them. They will need more from Jamie Barron and De Burca to try curtail this Tipperary attack but more importantly, they will need a serious evolution in their forward division. I don’t know if you can do that in the space of a week but they’re going to have to find something.
They need to create more and better space with intelligent runs and find some variation. Maybe Brick Walsh comes in, maybe Maurice starts – something to add size and aerial prowess. One way or the other, what they scored last Sunday in Walsh Park isn’t going to get it done. Not against Tipperary in this sort of free-scoring form.

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Milltown Row2

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #28 on: May 18, 2019, 03:24:58 PM »
Offaly in danger of being relegated from Joe McDonagh cup!
Anything I post is not the view of the County Board!! Nobody died in the making of this post ;-)

burdizzo

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Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2019, 10:14:45 AM »
I think Kerry will be relegated.