Author Topic: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report  (Read 4658 times)

highorlow

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2019, 11:09:02 AM »
Quote
What business does the GAA have in building a hotel?

Isn't the Croke Park Hotel the GAA's? I suppose it goes hand in hand with the corporate events that take place in HQ during the year. I stand corrected but I think they own Gills pub too?

Rossfan

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #46 on: February 08, 2019, 11:21:29 AM »
Anyone know what the proposed Cusack Stand redevelopment might entail?
2018- 2 Cupeens won, 2 to go.

Baile Brigín 2

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #47 on: February 08, 2019, 11:27:18 AM »
Anyone know what the proposed Cusack Stand redevelopment might entail?

I have some vague memory of a plan to do a big walkway, Wembley style, where Sackville Avenue now is. Have your pint and burger there. The flats are gone, so maybe its back on the table


manfromdelmonte

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #49 on: February 08, 2019, 11:27:55 PM »
Anyone know what the proposed Cusack Stand redevelopment might entail?

I have some vague memory of a plan to do a big walkway, Wembley style, where Sackville Avenue now is. Have your pint and burger there. The flats are gone, so maybe its back on the table
There is something being built there at the moment
« Last Edit: February 09, 2019, 08:16:49 AM by manfromdelmonte »

seafoid

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #50 on: February 09, 2019, 07:23:02 AM »
So let's have your suggestions on what they should do.

1. Complete cleanout on Jones Road. Too many chefs, too many committees too many tinkerings to justify their existence. In general, leave it alone

2. Accountability. The people who brought us the puc debacle have been rewarded. The GAA press need to be critical and risk the trough.

3. Stop this anti sport attitude. Dublin and Kilkenny are where they are because of good decisions and graft. Handicapping them is not the approach, pull up your own socks.

4. That said the imbalance in funding is crazy. Back ambition wherever it is.

5. Infrastructure is all over the place. PuC, Casement, Tallaght. Disasters following no pattern.

.

I think the Dubs are a different kettle of fish to KK
The GAA didn't decide to fund KK systematically to the detriment of everyone else

The Dubs were a bit of joke between 1996 and 2008 say

https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/gaelic-football/fault-lines-appear-for-kerry-in-a-kingdom-under-pressure-1.3769567

 "Dublin’s transformation from 1970s nostalgia act to unprecedented juggernaut has forced Kerry football people – all Kerry people, in other words – to think differently about themselves. The old certainties have been stripped away with bewildering haste."

Not long ago you were saying the opposite seafoid! I suppose now that you have seen the Dubs up close against Galway you now realise the true nature of this animal. Talk of cycles has vanished?
I didn’t realise how lopsided the funding was FTB
And last year showed how far behind the peloton is.
We might get another all Ireland out of the hurlers;)

Football is a mess

How? There has been pages and pages of articles, reports, graphs, etc posted on GAABOARD. You are always on here. How in the name of bejaysus did you miss all this? It's been like a sore thumb for half a decade now!
I thought Mayo would win at least one of those finals. So did many  people.
Mayo made it look like there was competition .

When Mayo fell away last year there was nobody.
The Wexford 4 in a row ran out of gas . The Kerry 4 in a row were beaten by a very good team. Tipp had been improving before Lar Corbett killed the drive for 5.
But now it looks like a procession for the Dubs.

Funding Dublin now is even worse because that’s where most of the money
is in the country as a result of the economic system.
They closed Tigh an Phoist in Corca Dhuibhne yesterday.
 Would be close to O Sé country. Football parishes all over are subject to the same forces.

Dublin is like Paris St Germain at this stage.

https://youtu.be/KJKbDz4EZio
Lookit

Baile Brigín 2

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #51 on: February 09, 2019, 12:29:59 PM »
So its Dublin GAA's fault thst rural Ireland is unsustsinable?

caprea

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #52 on: February 09, 2019, 12:40:20 PM »
So its Dublin GAA's fault thst rural Ireland is unsustsinable?

If rural Ireland is unsustainable then the present intercounty system in GAA is unsustainable so what’s easier to do? Write off the county of Dublin in its present state or write off the entire rest of Ireland?

manfromdelmonte

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #53 on: February 09, 2019, 04:36:17 PM »
So its Dublin GAA's fault thst rural Ireland is unsustsinable?
It's unsustainable due to almost all development  investment going into the Dublin  region
Both by the government and the GAA.


Hound

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #54 on: February 09, 2019, 07:48:33 PM »
I know of 3 clubs in the midlands who were willing to 50% fund a full time coach, shared between the 3 clubs.
They had a club coaching plan, funding plan, and school coaching plan all in place and they went looking for matching funding
No matching funding available at county or provincial level.

That's shocking if true.
Goes against all information given by the GAA in relation to such funding.
Let's find out if it is true.

Start by the naming the clubs involved and we'll go from there.


As I said before, Dubs are like Brexiteers
Cannot deal with the facts

C'mon let's get the facts.

You hardly just made that up. Did you?


Honestly Hound I'd say you're barking up the wrong tree here. I know for a fact if my own club could get a coach for just €14k we'd have done it but there's no matching funds anywhere. As a county, Sligo has only 4 and one of them (hurling GPO) has to work a day a week in Leitrim. I'd guess here are clubs in Dublin who have more coaches.
I don't think that's true. If you have the €14k, then the GAA gives you the other €14k. But no club outside Dublin has done this.

Every one of these coaches that is outside Dublin has been funded 100% by the GAA. Only in Dublin have clubs had to stump up 50% (which is fair as half their time is with the club, and half is with schools, so the former funded by the club, the latter funded by the GAA)

manfromdelmonte

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #55 on: February 09, 2019, 08:42:10 PM »
I know of 3 clubs in the midlands who were willing to 50% fund a full time coach, shared between the 3 clubs.
They had a club coaching plan, funding plan, and school coaching plan all in place and they went looking for matching funding
No matching funding available at county or provincial level.

That's shocking if true.
Goes against all information given by the GAA in relation to such funding.
Let's find out if it is true.

Start by the naming the clubs involved and we'll go from there.


As I said before, Dubs are like Brexiteers
Cannot deal with the facts

C'mon let's get the facts.

You hardly just made that up. Did you?


Honestly Hound I'd say you're barking up the wrong tree here. I know for a fact if my own club could get a coach for just €14k we'd have done it but there's no matching funds anywhere. As a county, Sligo has only 4 and one of them (hurling GPO) has to work a day a week in Leitrim. I'd guess here are clubs in Dublin who have more coaches.
I don't think that's true. If you have the €14k, then the GAA gives you the other €14k. But no club outside Dublin has done this.

Every one of these coaches that is outside Dublin has been funded 100% by the GAA. Only in Dublin have clubs had to stump up 50% (which is fair as half their time is with the club, and half is with schools, so the former funded by the club, the latter funded by the GAA)
What club outside Dublin has a coach funded?

From the Bunker

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #56 on: February 09, 2019, 09:47:06 PM »
You look at this and you see different lives.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-MlW1VbTkA&t=81s

Lar Naparka

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #57 on: February 09, 2019, 10:18:20 PM »
For what it’s worth, I wish people would shut the f**k up about Dublin getting larger grants.

A quarter of the population live in that county. If they weren’t receiving an exceptional percentage of overall funding spend, it would be wholly unfair on people born in Dublin, and would be detrimental to the GAA’s grassroots policy of “get them involved with their club early, get them involved for life”.

This is NOT a modern GAA problem. This one rolls all the way back to 1884, when the core constructs of the Association were founded upon the well-meaning and identity-building - but fundamentally imbalanced - partition of jurisdictions according to county lines.

It just so happens that Dublin have come across a golden generation of players at the same time that social media has enabled every dimwit across the land to have an opinion, and to drumbeat the populist narrative. The Dublin dominance issue will  fix itself in a couple of year, except the dimwits in 10 years time will then be yelping about how the GAA needs a strong Dublin.


——-

Fundamentally, where the suits need put in order, is this.

1. Core values of community and volunteering need stamped on their foreheads, sent as daily reminders, typed in 10 foot letters at the top of every letter or enail they read. Every decision they make needs to be evaluated against how it improves the Association for communities and volunteers. If it doesn’t help them, don’t proceed..

2. Strategies, annual budgets and forecasts should focus on minimising expenditure, and not maximising revenue. This concept does not rule out large infrastructure projects or a commitment to coaching; as both provide advantages to members. But it should minimise the desire/need/will to collect pits of cash and then decide what to spend it on. The purpose of this organisation should never be to gather money.

——
I think you are missing the point here. The development grant(s) are not dished out to counties but per individual player. Going by the last published figures I know of, (2010-2014) Dublin got over €274 per individual, regardless of status.By comparison each  Mayo was paid €22 (or thereabouts) and Kerry got the princely sum of €19 for every player they had registered.
For the record, Dublin has easily the lowest participation rate of any county in Ireland. Here I am talking about active participation as players or supporters.
No rocket science involved here- say Dublin play Longford and 50% of the population of Longford turn up, whereas it would be unlikely that Dublin would bring anywhere near 5% of its population along. Which county would have the greater support at the game?
Nil Carborundum Illegitemi

Hound

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #58 on: February 09, 2019, 10:41:38 PM »
I know of 3 clubs in the midlands who were willing to 50% fund a full time coach, shared between the 3 clubs.
They had a club coaching plan, funding plan, and school coaching plan all in place and they went looking for matching funding
No matching funding available at county or provincial level.

That's shocking if true.
Goes against all information given by the GAA in relation to such funding.
Let's find out if it is true.

Start by the naming the clubs involved and we'll go from there.


As I said before, Dubs are like Brexiteers
Cannot deal with the facts

C'mon let's get the facts.

You hardly just made that up. Did you?


Honestly Hound I'd say you're barking up the wrong tree here. I know for a fact if my own club could get a coach for just €14k we'd have done it but there's no matching funds anywhere. As a county, Sligo has only 4 and one of them (hurling GPO) has to work a day a week in Leitrim. I'd guess here are clubs in Dublin who have more coaches.
I don't think that's true. If you have the €14k, then the GAA gives you the other €14k. But no club outside Dublin has done this.

Every one of these coaches that is outside Dublin has been funded 100% by the GAA. Only in Dublin have clubs had to stump up 50% (which is fair as half their time is with the club, and half is with schools, so the former funded by the club, the latter funded by the GAA)
What club outside Dublin has a coach funded?
Every coach outside of Dublin. There's about 100 in Leinster (outside Dublin). Unlike in Dublin, the clubs contribute nothing, 100% funded by GAA

Hound

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #59 on: February 09, 2019, 10:49:54 PM »
For what it’s worth, I wish people would shut the f**k up about Dublin getting larger grants.

A quarter of the population live in that county. If they weren’t receiving an exceptional percentage of overall funding spend, it would be wholly unfair on people born in Dublin, and would be detrimental to the GAA’s grassroots policy of “get them involved with their club early, get them involved for life”.

This is NOT a modern GAA problem. This one rolls all the way back to 1884, when the core constructs of the Association were founded upon the well-meaning and identity-building - but fundamentally imbalanced - partition of jurisdictions according to county lines.

It just so happens that Dublin have come across a golden generation of players at the same time that social media has enabled every dimwit across the land to have an opinion, and to drumbeat the populist narrative. The Dublin dominance issue will  fix itself in a couple of year, except the dimwits in 10 years time will then be yelping about how the GAA needs a strong Dublin.


——-

Fundamentally, where the suits need put in order, is this.

1. Core values of community and volunteering need stamped on their foreheads, sent as daily reminders, typed in 10 foot letters at the top of every letter or enail they read. Every decision they make needs to be evaluated against how it improves the Association for communities and volunteers. If it doesn’t help them, don’t proceed..

2. Strategies, annual budgets and forecasts should focus on minimising expenditure, and not maximising revenue. This concept does not rule out large infrastructure projects or a commitment to coaching; as both provide advantages to members. But it should minimise the desire/need/will to collect pits of cash and then decide what to spend it on. The purpose of this organisation should never be to gather money.

——
I think you are missing the point here. The development grant(s) are not dished out to counties but per individual player. Going by the last published figures I know of, (2010-2014) Dublin got over €274 per individual, regardless of status.By comparison each  Mayo was paid €22 (or thereabouts) and Kerry got the princely sum of €19 for every player they had registered.
For the record, Dublin has easily the lowest participation rate of any county in Ireland. Here I am talking about active participation as players or supporters.
No rocket science involved here- say Dublin play Longford and 50% of the population of Longford turn up, whereas it would be unlikely that Dublin would bring anywhere near 5% of its population along. Which county would have the greater support at the game?
Lots of apples and oranges there Lar.

here's the actual breakdown: