Author Topic: The Magic of Hurling (just another highlight video I made thought I would share)  (Read 8635 times)

Rimbaud82

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-5p-HgBev4

Annoyingly, GAAGO took last years games down just as I was about to make the video, it can be hard enough getting quality GAA footage (you'd think they'd make it easier for fans like, the NBA has realised it's actually a good way to grow the game)...but this means that the clips are from all over the show (some not as good quality as I'd like), but hopefully the video turned out well.

Just another general tribute to our wonderful sport, so a mixture of old and new clips. I had done a few videos a couple of years back, but just took a notion to make another one.

Any suggestions or tips for future vids are welcome :)

seafoid

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Good stuff

I think Irish music and hurling is a great combo

Bits I wouldnít mind seeing :

Jer the rigger by Hayes and Cahill Live in Seattle
Go west along the road by Hayes and Cahill live in Seattle
Si bheag si mhor  by Planxty

Really good hurling quotes could work as well

https://youtu.be/2cz6vsTLPJU

14:10 Dan Shanahan
Itís an honour to be playing against them lads.
-Pause-
And bating them

15:18 He said to me keep going, keep doing what you are doing, keep moving around . Donít stand in the one spot.

https://youtu.be/2cz6vsTLPJU
Justin McCarthy
15:35

I think you must have belief that you can do something. You must believe that you can do it.


https://youtu.be/jfFnL_o8QS0
Mick Mackey

2:33
I knew I was strong from hitting against fellas, older fellas and that . You felt that ę well, I could take that fella Ľ type of thing.

As the years went on you would say to yourself Iím sorry I didnít do this or that. If you were to go back a second time you would play different really. You would do different things . But you donít get a second chance.

3:40
They all went to Thurles to see Mackey giving an exhibition. He carried the whole Limerick support on his shoulders.

Say you could juxtapose Mackey with limerick winning last year
Lookit

Rimbaud82

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Good stuff

I think Irish music and hurling is a great combo

Bits I wouldnít mind seeing :

Jer the rigger by Hayes and Cahill Live in Seattle
Go west along the road by Hayes and Cahill live in Seattle
Si bheag si mhor  by Planxty

Really good hurling quotes could work as well

https://youtu.be/2cz6vsTLPJU

14:10 Dan Shanahan
Itís an honour to be playing against them lads.
-Pause-
And bating them

15:18 He said to me keep going, keep doing what you are doing, keep moving around . Donít stand in the one spot.

https://youtu.be/2cz6vsTLPJU
Justin McCarthy
15:35

I think you must have belief that you can do something. You must believe that you can do it.


https://youtu.be/jfFnL_o8QS0
Mick Mackey

2:33
I knew I was strong from hitting against fellas, older fellas and that . You felt that ę well, I could take that fella Ľ type of thing.

As the years went on you would say to yourself Iím sorry I didnít do this or that. If you were to go back a second time you would play different really. You would do different things . But you donít get a second chance.

3:40
They all went to Thurles to see Mackey giving an exhibition. He carried the whole Limerick support on his shoulders.

Say you could juxtapose Mackey with limerick winning last year

Thanks mate :) Good suggestions, I was thinking it'd be a good idea to break up the music with a few more audio clips over the top.

Mossy Bruce

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Good job! When people, here in the States, ask me what hurling is, Iíll start pointing them toward your video. I love the old, black and white footage.
LAOIS! LAOIS! LAOIS!

From the Bunker

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looking at the video, you realise the non impact of north Connacht, North Leinster and Ulster in the Hurling Championship. Hurling is a foreign to these parts of the country, they are just spectators.

johnnycool

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looking at the video, you realise the non impact of north Connacht, North Leinster and Ulster in the Hurling Championship. Hurling is a foreign to these parts of the country, they are just spectators.

How so?

seafoid

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looking at the video, you realise the non impact of north Connacht, North Leinster and Ulster in the Hurling Championship. Hurling is a foreign to these parts of the country, they are just spectators.

Would you shtop

http://gaaboard.com/board/index.php?topic=1347.0
Lookit

seafoid

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https://www.rte.ie/eile/brainstorm/2018/0724/980751-the-roots-of-the-greatest-sport-on-earth/

The idea that the remaking of hurling in the 1880s is a rural thing, something that flowed outwards from Thurles, a kind of a gift bestowed by the people of Tipperary to the rest of humanity, is just wrong.

What the GAA has done is create a framework in particular counties, dependent on local tradition and individuals, to drive the development of the game. There are stories from various parts of the country which are not traditionally considered hurling heartlands where the game prospered, because of the actions of a particular guard or a teacher, or a small group of people within a particular area who made a hurling club and made hurling a beloved game in a particular place.
The singular failure of the Gaelic Athletic Association when it comes to hurling is a failure to broaden the base. The reality is you can write down the names of one quarter of the counties of Ireland, and you can make a very sizeable guess that it is from those eight counties that the next 50 All-Ireland hurling championship winners will come from. 

You look at the Offaly players who won the All-Irelands in the 1980s and they came from the great schools teams of the 1970s, and from a very solid competitive local club culture. All the teams from the 1990s had underage medals won with Offaly and with their schools.
No county has ever made a breakthrough without having two basic things. Number one, a proper underage and schools development system. Number two, a significant number of clubs playing the game to a reasonable level. Without those two things, it is impossible. If you look at any county that has made the breakthrough in modern times, it is dependent on those things.

There is a further factor. Probably the greatest factor impeding the spread and growth of hurling is not rugby or soccer or video games. Itís not anything except Gaelic football. In GAA clubs where Gaelic football is strong, there is an understandable but real reticence to allow hurling be promoted to a level at which excellence can be developed to an extent to make that club or that county truly competitive on a national scale.
Lookit

marty34

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https://www.rte.ie/eile/brainstorm/2018/0724/980751-the-roots-of-the-greatest-sport-on-earth/

The idea that the remaking of hurling in the 1880s is a rural thing, something that flowed outwards from Thurles, a kind of a gift bestowed by the people of Tipperary to the rest of humanity, is just wrong.

What the GAA has done is create a framework in particular counties, dependent on local tradition and individuals, to drive the development of the game. There are stories from various parts of the country which are not traditionally considered hurling heartlands where the game prospered, because of the actions of a particular guard or a teacher, or a small group of people within a particular area who made a hurling club and made hurling a beloved game in a particular place.
The singular failure of the Gaelic Athletic Association when it comes to hurling is a failure to broaden the base. The reality is you can write down the names of one quarter of the counties of Ireland, and you can make a very sizeable guess that it is from those eight counties that the next 50 All-Ireland hurling championship winners will come from.

You look at the Offaly players who won the All-Irelands in the 1980s and they came from the great schools teams of the 1970s, and from a very solid competitive local club culture. All the teams from the 1990s had underage medals won with Offaly and with their schools.
No county has ever made a breakthrough without having two basic things. Number one, a proper underage and schools development system. Number two, a significant number of clubs playing the game to a reasonable level. Without those two things, it is impossible. If you look at any county that has made the breakthrough in modern times, it is dependent on those things.

There is a further factor. Probably the greatest factor impeding the spread and growth of hurling is not rugby or soccer or video games. Itís not anything except Gaelic football. In GAA clubs where Gaelic football is strong, there is an understandable but real reticence to allow hurling be promoted to a level at which excellence can be developed to an extent to make that club or that county truly competitive on a national scale.

The bit about the 8 winners of the hurling championship could be the same for football also, maybe even less the way things are going.

But I agree with what you're saying: 1. the Gaa has, over the past 100 years, failed to spread hurling as they should and 2. it's down , to a large extent, of football people in clubs not embracing the duality/benefits of a dual club.

manfromdelmonte

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https://www.rte.ie/eile/brainstorm/2018/0724/980751-the-roots-of-the-greatest-sport-on-earth/

The idea that the remaking of hurling in the 1880s is a rural thing, something that flowed outwards from Thurles, a kind of a gift bestowed by the people of Tipperary to the rest of humanity, is just wrong.

What the GAA has done is create a framework in particular counties, dependent on local tradition and individuals, to drive the development of the game. There are stories from various parts of the country which are not traditionally considered hurling heartlands where the game prospered, because of the actions of a particular guard or a teacher, or a small group of people within a particular area who made a hurling club and made hurling a beloved game in a particular place.
The singular failure of the Gaelic Athletic Association when it comes to hurling is a failure to broaden the base. The reality is you can write down the names of one quarter of the counties of Ireland, and you can make a very sizeable guess that it is from those eight counties that the next 50 All-Ireland hurling championship winners will come from.

You look at the Offaly players who won the All-Irelands in the 1980s and they came from the great schools teams of the 1970s, and from a very solid competitive local club culture. All the teams from the 1990s had underage medals won with Offaly and with their schools.
No county has ever made a breakthrough without having two basic things. Number one, a proper underage and schools development system. Number two, a significant number of clubs playing the game to a reasonable level. Without those two things, it is impossible. If you look at any county that has made the breakthrough in modern times, it is dependent on those things.

There is a further factor. Probably the greatest factor impeding the spread and growth of hurling is not rugby or soccer or video games. Itís not anything except Gaelic football. In GAA clubs where Gaelic football is strong, there is an understandable but real reticence to allow hurling be promoted to a level at which excellence can be developed to an extent to make that club or that county truly competitive on a national scale.

The bit about the 8 winners of the hurling championship could be the same for football also, maybe even less the way things are going.

But I agree with what you're saying: 1. the Gaa has, over the past 100 years, failed to spread hurling as they should and 2. it's down , to a large extent, of football people in clubs not embracing the duality/benefits of a dual club.
You need double the number of coaches to have a proper dual club
You also need more players
hurling is  much more expensive sport to play than football

marty34

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https://www.rte.ie/eile/brainstorm/2018/0724/980751-the-roots-of-the-greatest-sport-on-earth/

The idea that the remaking of hurling in the 1880s is a rural thing, something that flowed outwards from Thurles, a kind of a gift bestowed by the people of Tipperary to the rest of humanity, is just wrong.

What the GAA has done is create a framework in particular counties, dependent on local tradition and individuals, to drive the development of the game. There are stories from various parts of the country which are not traditionally considered hurling heartlands where the game prospered, because of the actions of a particular guard or a teacher, or a small group of people within a particular area who made a hurling club and made hurling a beloved game in a particular place.
The singular failure of the Gaelic Athletic Association when it comes to hurling is a failure to broaden the base. The reality is you can write down the names of one quarter of the counties of Ireland, and you can make a very sizeable guess that it is from those eight counties that the next 50 All-Ireland hurling championship winners will come from.

You look at the Offaly players who won the All-Irelands in the 1980s and they came from the great schools teams of the 1970s, and from a very solid competitive local club culture. All the teams from the 1990s had underage medals won with Offaly and with their schools.
No county has ever made a breakthrough without having two basic things. Number one, a proper underage and schools development system. Number two, a significant number of clubs playing the game to a reasonable level. Without those two things, it is impossible. If you look at any county that has made the breakthrough in modern times, it is dependent on those things.

There is a further factor. Probably the greatest factor impeding the spread and growth of hurling is not rugby or soccer or video games. Itís not anything except Gaelic football. In GAA clubs where Gaelic football is strong, there is an understandable but real reticence to allow hurling be promoted to a level at which excellence can be developed to an extent to make that club or that county truly competitive on a national scale.

The bit about the 8 winners of the hurling championship could be the same for football also, maybe even less the way things are going.

But I agree with what you're saying: 1. the Gaa has, over the past 100 years, failed to spread hurling as they should and 2. it's down , to a large extent, of football people in clubs not embracing the duality/benefits of a dual club.
You need double the number of coaches to have a proper dual club
You also need more players
hurling is  much more expensive sport to play than football

Cost shouldn't be an issue - most lads I know buy their own hurls and helmets. At underage, 1 hurl will do them quite a while.  People use money as an excuse.  I look to examples of Cratloe in Clare, Slaughtneil in Derry, St. Galls in Antrim and Ballyboden in Dublin etc. etc. Strong dual clubs who play codes.  Their players are better for playing the 2 sports in my opinion.

manfromdelmonte

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https://www.rte.ie/eile/brainstorm/2018/0724/980751-the-roots-of-the-greatest-sport-on-earth/

The idea that the remaking of hurling in the 1880s is a rural thing, something that flowed outwards from Thurles, a kind of a gift bestowed by the people of Tipperary to the rest of humanity, is just wrong.

What the GAA has done is create a framework in particular counties, dependent on local tradition and individuals, to drive the development of the game. There are stories from various parts of the country which are not traditionally considered hurling heartlands where the game prospered, because of the actions of a particular guard or a teacher, or a small group of people within a particular area who made a hurling club and made hurling a beloved game in a particular place.
The singular failure of the Gaelic Athletic Association when it comes to hurling is a failure to broaden the base. The reality is you can write down the names of one quarter of the counties of Ireland, and you can make a very sizeable guess that it is from those eight counties that the next 50 All-Ireland hurling championship winners will come from.

You look at the Offaly players who won the All-Irelands in the 1980s and they came from the great schools teams of the 1970s, and from a very solid competitive local club culture. All the teams from the 1990s had underage medals won with Offaly and with their schools.
No county has ever made a breakthrough without having two basic things. Number one, a proper underage and schools development system. Number two, a significant number of clubs playing the game to a reasonable level. Without those two things, it is impossible. If you look at any county that has made the breakthrough in modern times, it is dependent on those things.

There is a further factor. Probably the greatest factor impeding the spread and growth of hurling is not rugby or soccer or video games. Itís not anything except Gaelic football. In GAA clubs where Gaelic football is strong, there is an understandable but real reticence to allow hurling be promoted to a level at which excellence can be developed to an extent to make that club or that county truly competitive on a national scale.

The bit about the 8 winners of the hurling championship could be the same for football also, maybe even less the way things are going.

But I agree with what you're saying: 1. the Gaa has, over the past 100 years, failed to spread hurling as they should and 2. it's down , to a large extent, of football people in clubs not embracing the duality/benefits of a dual club.
You need double the number of coaches to have a proper dual club
You also need more players
hurling is  much more expensive sport to play than football

Cost shouldn't be an issue - most lads I know buy their own hurls and helmets. At underage, 1 hurl will do them quite a while.  People use money as an excuse.  I look to examples of Cratloe in Clare, Slaughtneil in Derry, St. Galls in Antrim and Ballyboden in Dublin etc. etc. Strong dual clubs who play codes.  Their players are better for playing the 2 sports in my opinion.
ok
get hurling going in a football school with lets say, 80 children in the school.
at least 30 helmets - Ä1000 at least
at least 50 hurleys - Ä600 (from U8 up to U12) at least
each year you will need to replace 20 of the sticks as they are broken and go missing, so thats a recurring cost of Ä240
6 dozen sliotars - 2 dozen for U8, U10, U12 which will need to be replaced each year as they get weathered and go missing

you can offer discounted helmets for sale through the club and school scheme (some county boards don't offer it to schools), but the maximum number of helmets is generally 30. the hurleys aren't usually of a great quality

marty34

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https://www.rte.ie/eile/brainstorm/2018/0724/980751-the-roots-of-the-greatest-sport-on-earth/

The idea that the remaking of hurling in the 1880s is a rural thing, something that flowed outwards from Thurles, a kind of a gift bestowed by the people of Tipperary to the rest of humanity, is just wrong.

What the GAA has done is create a framework in particular counties, dependent on local tradition and individuals, to drive the development of the game. There are stories from various parts of the country which are not traditionally considered hurling heartlands where the game prospered, because of the actions of a particular guard or a teacher, or a small group of people within a particular area who made a hurling club and made hurling a beloved game in a particular place.
The singular failure of the Gaelic Athletic Association when it comes to hurling is a failure to broaden the base. The reality is you can write down the names of one quarter of the counties of Ireland, and you can make a very sizeable guess that it is from those eight counties that the next 50 All-Ireland hurling championship winners will come from.

You look at the Offaly players who won the All-Irelands in the 1980s and they came from the great schools teams of the 1970s, and from a very solid competitive local club culture. All the teams from the 1990s had underage medals won with Offaly and with their schools.
No county has ever made a breakthrough without having two basic things. Number one, a proper underage and schools development system. Number two, a significant number of clubs playing the game to a reasonable level. Without those two things, it is impossible. If you look at any county that has made the breakthrough in modern times, it is dependent on those things.

There is a further factor. Probably the greatest factor impeding the spread and growth of hurling is not rugby or soccer or video games. Itís not anything except Gaelic football. In GAA clubs where Gaelic football is strong, there is an understandable but real reticence to allow hurling be promoted to a level at which excellence can be developed to an extent to make that club or that county truly competitive on a national scale.

The bit about the 8 winners of the hurling championship could be the same for football also, maybe even less the way things are going.

But I agree with what you're saying: 1. the Gaa has, over the past 100 years, failed to spread hurling as they should and 2. it's down , to a large extent, of football people in clubs not embracing the duality/benefits of a dual club.
You need double the number of coaches to have a proper dual club
You also need more players
hurling is  much more expensive sport to play than football

Cost shouldn't be an issue - most lads I know buy their own hurls and helmets. At underage, 1 hurl will do them quite a while.  People use money as an excuse.  I look to examples of Cratloe in Clare, Slaughtneil in Derry, St. Galls in Antrim and Ballyboden in Dublin etc. etc. Strong dual clubs who play codes.  Their players are better for playing the 2 sports in my opinion.
ok
get hurling going in a football school with lets say, 80 children in the school.
at least 30 helmets - Ä1000 at least
at least 50 hurleys - Ä600 (from U8 up to U12) at least
each year you will need to replace 20 of the sticks as they are broken and go missing, so thats a recurring cost of Ä240
6 dozen sliotars - 2 dozen for U8, U10, U12 which will need to be replaced each year as they get weathered and go missing

you can offer discounted helmets for sale through the club and school scheme (some county boards don't offer it to schools), but the maximum number of helmets is generally 30. the hurleys aren't usually of a great quality

Two things here I think - hurling will start with club first, then introduce to school.  If it starts in school, it will only be played in school.

A better way would be to put a message out asking for unused/unwanted or helmets that are too small for family members etc.  They'd get about a dozen helmets this way without a doubt.  People/parents know it going to a good cause and are willing to give.  This is the same story with the hurls.  How many small hurls are in people's houses or stuck in a corner of a garage?

More importantly, any new hurling club starting nowadays will only work on a regional basis : i.e. 3 or 4 football clubs but the new club is under the name of the old regional name.  This is the way it is going now - Ulster council approved!

In regards of football, how much is an O'Neills size 4? £25 or £30 but loads about at an underage football training session.

manfromdelmonte

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https://www.rte.ie/eile/brainstorm/2018/0724/980751-the-roots-of-the-greatest-sport-on-earth/

The idea that the remaking of hurling in the 1880s is a rural thing, something that flowed outwards from Thurles, a kind of a gift bestowed by the people of Tipperary to the rest of humanity, is just wrong.

What the GAA has done is create a framework in particular counties, dependent on local tradition and individuals, to drive the development of the game. There are stories from various parts of the country which are not traditionally considered hurling heartlands where the game prospered, because of the actions of a particular guard or a teacher, or a small group of people within a particular area who made a hurling club and made hurling a beloved game in a particular place.
The singular failure of the Gaelic Athletic Association when it comes to hurling is a failure to broaden the base. The reality is you can write down the names of one quarter of the counties of Ireland, and you can make a very sizeable guess that it is from those eight counties that the next 50 All-Ireland hurling championship winners will come from.

You look at the Offaly players who won the All-Irelands in the 1980s and they came from the great schools teams of the 1970s, and from a very solid competitive local club culture. All the teams from the 1990s had underage medals won with Offaly and with their schools.
No county has ever made a breakthrough without having two basic things. Number one, a proper underage and schools development system. Number two, a significant number of clubs playing the game to a reasonable level. Without those two things, it is impossible. If you look at any county that has made the breakthrough in modern times, it is dependent on those things.

There is a further factor. Probably the greatest factor impeding the spread and growth of hurling is not rugby or soccer or video games. Itís not anything except Gaelic football. In GAA clubs where Gaelic football is strong, there is an understandable but real reticence to allow hurling be promoted to a level at which excellence can be developed to an extent to make that club or that county truly competitive on a national scale.

The bit about the 8 winners of the hurling championship could be the same for football also, maybe even less the way things are going.

But I agree with what you're saying: 1. the Gaa has, over the past 100 years, failed to spread hurling as they should and 2. it's down , to a large extent, of football people in clubs not embracing the duality/benefits of a dual club.
You need double the number of coaches to have a proper dual club
You also need more players
hurling is  much more expensive sport to play than football

Cost shouldn't be an issue - most lads I know buy their own hurls and helmets. At underage, 1 hurl will do them quite a while.  People use money as an excuse.  I look to examples of Cratloe in Clare, Slaughtneil in Derry, St. Galls in Antrim and Ballyboden in Dublin etc. etc. Strong dual clubs who play codes.  Their players are better for playing the 2 sports in my opinion.
ok
get hurling going in a football school with lets say, 80 children in the school.
at least 30 helmets - Ä1000 at least
at least 50 hurleys - Ä600 (from U8 up to U12) at least
each year you will need to replace 20 of the sticks as they are broken and go missing, so thats a recurring cost of Ä240
6 dozen sliotars - 2 dozen for U8, U10, U12 which will need to be replaced each year as they get weathered and go missing

you can offer discounted helmets for sale through the club and school scheme (some county boards don't offer it to schools), but the maximum number of helmets is generally 30. the hurleys aren't usually of a great quality

Two things here I think - hurling will start with club first, then introduce to school.  If it starts in school, it will only be played in school.

A better way would be to put a message out asking for unused/unwanted or helmets that are too small for family members etc.  They'd get about a dozen helmets this way without a doubt.  People/parents know it going to a good cause and are willing to give.  This is the same story with the hurls.  How many small hurls are in people's houses or stuck in a corner of a garage?

More importantly, any new hurling club starting nowadays will only work on a regional basis : i.e. 3 or 4 football clubs but the new club is under the name of the old regional name.  This is the way it is going now - Ulster council approved!

In regards of football, how much is an O'Neills size 4? £25 or £30 but loads about at an underage football training session.
fair enough, but kids don't want to be given an old helmet that was last worn in 1995
you can get gaelic footballs for Ä5 a pop if you order enough of them from the correct place...
same with sliotars

if you don't get the hurling going in the schools along with the club, it will never take off.
you need the kids looking forward to a coach coming into do training with them

marty34

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https://www.rte.ie/eile/brainstorm/2018/0724/980751-the-roots-of-the-greatest-sport-on-earth/

The idea that the remaking of hurling in the 1880s is a rural thing, something that flowed outwards from Thurles, a kind of a gift bestowed by the people of Tipperary to the rest of humanity, is just wrong.

What the GAA has done is create a framework in particular counties, dependent on local tradition and individuals, to drive the development of the game. There are stories from various parts of the country which are not traditionally considered hurling heartlands where the game prospered, because of the actions of a particular guard or a teacher, or a small group of people within a particular area who made a hurling club and made hurling a beloved game in a particular place.
The singular failure of the Gaelic Athletic Association when it comes to hurling is a failure to broaden the base. The reality is you can write down the names of one quarter of the counties of Ireland, and you can make a very sizeable guess that it is from those eight counties that the next 50 All-Ireland hurling championship winners will come from.

You look at the Offaly players who won the All-Irelands in the 1980s and they came from the great schools teams of the 1970s, and from a very solid competitive local club culture. All the teams from the 1990s had underage medals won with Offaly and with their schools.
No county has ever made a breakthrough without having two basic things. Number one, a proper underage and schools development system. Number two, a significant number of clubs playing the game to a reasonable level. Without those two things, it is impossible. If you look at any county that has made the breakthrough in modern times, it is dependent on those things.

There is a further factor. Probably the greatest factor impeding the spread and growth of hurling is not rugby or soccer or video games. Itís not anything except Gaelic football. In GAA clubs where Gaelic football is strong, there is an understandable but real reticence to allow hurling be promoted to a level at which excellence can be developed to an extent to make that club or that county truly competitive on a national scale.

The bit about the 8 winners of the hurling championship could be the same for football also, maybe even less the way things are going.

But I agree with what you're saying: 1. the Gaa has, over the past 100 years, failed to spread hurling as they should and 2. it's down , to a large extent, of football people in clubs not embracing the duality/benefits of a dual club.
You need double the number of coaches to have a proper dual club
You also need more players
hurling is  much more expensive sport to play than football

Cost shouldn't be an issue - most lads I know buy their own hurls and helmets. At underage, 1 hurl will do them quite a while.  People use money as an excuse.  I look to examples of Cratloe in Clare, Slaughtneil in Derry, St. Galls in Antrim and Ballyboden in Dublin etc. etc. Strong dual clubs who play codes.  Their players are better for playing the 2 sports in my opinion.
ok
get hurling going in a football school with lets say, 80 children in the school.
at least 30 helmets - Ä1000 at least
at least 50 hurleys - Ä600 (from U8 up to U12) at least
each year you will need to replace 20 of the sticks as they are broken and go missing, so thats a recurring cost of Ä240
6 dozen sliotars - 2 dozen for U8, U10, U12 which will need to be replaced each year as they get weathered and go missing

you can offer discounted helmets for sale through the club and school scheme (some county boards don't offer it to schools), but the maximum number of helmets is generally 30. the hurleys aren't usually of a great quality

Two things here I think - hurling will start with club first, then introduce to school.  If it starts in school, it will only be played in school.

A better way would be to put a message out asking for unused/unwanted or helmets that are too small for family members etc.  They'd get about a dozen helmets this way without a doubt.  People/parents know it going to a good cause and are willing to give.  This is the same story with the hurls.  How many small hurls are in people's houses or stuck in a corner of a garage?

More importantly, any new hurling club starting nowadays will only work on a regional basis : i.e. 3 or 4 football clubs but the new club is under the name of the old regional name.  This is the way it is going now - Ulster council approved!

In regards of football, how much is an O'Neills size 4? £25 or £30 but loads about at an underage football training session.
fair enough, but kids don't want to be given an old helmet that was last worn in 1995
you can get gaelic footballs for Ä5 a pop if you order enough of them from the correct place...
same with sliotars

if you don't get the hurling going in the schools along with the club, it will never take off.
you need the kids looking forward to a coach coming into do training with them

Point I was making football clubs use the 'expense' issue to justify not being a dual club or starting a hurling club.  As alluded to, clubs can start with old hurls and helmets - borrowed or otherwise.  Kids at that age are not that fashion conscious.

If football clubs diverted the big amounts alledgely given to their senior football managers, there wouldn't be a problem! In a lot of cases it could fund a juvenile hurling club for 3 years!!!