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In your county, has it:

Significantly increased in recent years
Significantly decreased in recent years
It's about the same

Author Topic: Violence in Adult Club Football  (Read 20721 times)

Therealdonald

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #15 on: September 17, 2018, 06:02:05 PM »
OMG the PC brigade are out in full force on this thread.

Boys being put off football for life after seeing a few slaps thrown....jesus christ get a grip.

thewobbler

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #16 on: September 17, 2018, 07:01:42 PM »
OMG the PC brigade are out in full force on this thread.

Boys being put off football for life after seeing a few slaps thrown....jesus christ get a grip.

Itís not a few slaps though. Itís people being kicked in the head, people being knee dropped in the head, people being sucker-punched for sport, people jumping fences and attacking strangers.

Itís stuff that if it happened to you, your friends or family on a street, would see you seeking legal action, and the assailants getting custodial sentences.

Itís not a few slaps.

I wonder what your take on the London knife epidemic is. ďAh sure itís only lads growing up and seeing what they can get away with. Let lads be ladsĒ Iíd imagine.

Therealdonald

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2018, 07:12:04 PM »
OMG the PC brigade are out in full force on this thread.

Boys being put off football for life after seeing a few slaps thrown....jesus christ get a grip.

Itís not a few slaps though. Itís people being kicked in the head, people being knee dropped in the head, people being sucker-punched for sport, people jumping fences and attacking strangers.

Itís stuff that if it happened to you, your friends or family on a street, would see you seeking legal action, and the assailants getting custodial sentences.

Itís not a few slaps.

I wonder what your take on the London knife epidemic is. ďAh sure itís only lads growing up and seeing what they can get away with. Let lads be ladsĒ Iíd imagine.

This whole thread is designed to discuss the incidents in the Tyrone games over the weekend. These are passionate men, playing for their Parish, representing their Parish. The same men that you watch in that fight from Friday night, could be teaching your children, fixing your washing machine today. So to compare them with knife weilding gangsters in london, or to mention London's knife crime in the same paragraph is just utterly ridiculous.

thewobbler

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2018, 07:19:51 PM »
Thatís an aside MacDonald.

But seeing as youíve just reinforced your stance with a maxim that ďanything goesĒ, Iím just not sure where youíd draw the line between manning up and willingly executing physical pain on another human being.

I wouldnít like to be your dog or your missus after youíve had a few, thatís for sure.

Insane Bolt

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2018, 08:32:29 PM »
I sincerely hope that what happened to Sean Cavanagh was accidental and not deliberate. Thuggery has to be stamped out......one wouldn't accept it on the street, therefore shouldn't have to on the field of play. I know that the GAA are reluctant to have police involvement in any investigation, but if a player is left with no alternative then so be it.

Therealdonald

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2018, 08:35:13 PM »
Thatís an aside MacDonald.

But seeing as youíve just reinforced your stance with a maxim that ďanything goesĒ, Iím just not sure where youíd draw the line between manning up and willingly executing physical pain on another human being.

I wouldnít like to be your dog or your missus after youíve had a few, thatís for sure.

So now I'm a wife beating, dog hitting alcoholic?? Wow wobbler.

gaafan2

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2018, 08:44:04 PM »
There are no more melees nowadays than what there has been down through the years. The difference being now is social media puts it out there for the whole country to see. Pre-social media, unless a game was televised there would be little or no talk about a melee.

BennyHarp

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2018, 08:49:55 PM »
Thereís a certain irony in this thread being started by a Meath man. I didnít even know violence existed in the GAA until 1996.
That was never a square ball!!

brokencrossbar1

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2018, 08:53:53 PM »
I would tend to agree that there are fewer melees nowadays than there used to be. The difference I would say though is that there are greater injuries from them now as thereís a bit less restraint and a lot more power in the strikes. Also as has been said the use of phone cameras makes it inevitable that they will hit social media whereas back when I played it was talked about in the pub afterwards, very often between the two people fighting!!!  I recently was talking to a fullback who would have marked me regularly and we made the very point that often enough we would have gone toe to toe and then drank in the club house after it. Hands were shook and that was that. I recently had an incident on the sideline when a manager had a go at me and threatened to break my jaw. Tempers were high as our player had been hurt and I wasnít pleased. After the game I went to him and wished him all the best and shook his hand. End of the matter. These things happen and it can be self managed but I do think there has to be some more emphasis placed on the people on the sideline from a very young age to temper their behaviour as patterns are created and young players develop their Ďmindsetí from a very young age. Itís very hard to change them at 22-23.

thewobbler

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2018, 09:23:21 PM »
Thatís an aside MacDonald.

But seeing as youíve just reinforced your stance with a maxim that ďanything goesĒ, Iím just not sure where youíd draw the line between manning up and willingly executing physical pain on another human being.

I wouldnít like to be your dog or your missus after youíve had a few, thatís for sure.

So now I'm a wife beating, dog hitting alcoholic?? Wow wobbler.

No. Youíre someone who openly welcomes violent acts on a football field. Thatís all we know for sure. Everything else is me just wondering out loud about whether itís a continual theme in your life, or if youíve managed to confine it to GAA matches

Jinxy

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #25 on: September 17, 2018, 09:31:34 PM »
Thereís a certain irony in this thread being started by a Meath man. I didnít even know violence existed in the GAA until 1996.


If you were any use you'd be playing.

Therealdonald

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #26 on: September 17, 2018, 09:43:54 PM »
Thatís an aside MacDonald.

But seeing as youíve just reinforced your stance with a maxim that ďanything goesĒ, Iím just not sure where youíd draw the line between manning up and willingly executing physical pain on another human being.

I wouldnít like to be your dog or your missus after youíve had a few, thatís for sure.

So now I'm a wife beating, dog hitting alcoholic?? Wow wobbler.

No. Youíre someone who openly welcomes violent acts on a football field. Thatís all we know for sure. Everything else is me just wondering out loud about whether itís a continual theme in your life, or if youíve managed to confine it to GAA matches

Can't believe what I'm reading here. Are you being serious? I don't welcome them. I do accept that they do come with the territory. I hope they become less and less. But we are asking players to put in more and more effort, with this comes greater pressure and alot more will to win, so tempers will boil over. In my opinion there is a massive difference between a big row between 40 odd players / subs and a dirty act like kicking a man on a gorund. The kick is unacceptable. Rows come and go.

This whole thread is idicative of todays PC brigade trying to protect little Jonny from what the real world is like. Then said little Jonny grows up in a protective cocoon, and as soon as he's too old for mama's teet, he gets the shock of a lifetime.

Club championship is passionate football, rows will happen. Get a grip and move on.

And for the record I'm not married, have never hit a woman nor a dog. But in this brief flicking romance myself and you have had Wobbler I can already tell that no I wouldn't like you, because frankly you sound like a big nonce.

BarryBreensBandage

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #27 on: September 17, 2018, 10:20:10 PM »
Thereís a certain irony in this thread being started by a Meath man. I didnít even know violence existed in the GAA until 1996.




 ;D
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BarryBreensBandage

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #28 on: September 17, 2018, 10:44:43 PM »
I would tend to agree that there are fewer melees nowadays than there used to be. The difference I would say though is that there are greater injuries from them now as thereís a bit less restraint and a lot more power in the strikes. Also as has been said the use of phone cameras makes it inevitable that they will hit social media whereas back when I played it was talked about in the pub afterwards, very often between the two people fighting!!!  I recently was talking to a fullback who would have marked me regularly and we made the very point that often enough we would have gone toe to toe and then drank in the club house after it. Hands were shook and that was that. I recently had an incident on the sideline when a manager had a go at me and threatened to break my jaw. Tempers were high as our player had been hurt and I wasnít pleased. After the game I went to him and wished him all the best and shook his hand. End of the matter. These things happen and it can be self managed but I do think there has to be some more emphasis placed on the people on the sideline from a very young age to temper their behaviour as patterns are created and young players develop their Ďmindsetí from a very young age. Itís very hard to change them at 22-23.

Fair enough H, but the games I seen you playing in where you were at your best, dirt wasn't involved. And to be fair to you, I never seen you instigate anything, it was always reactionary (I stand to be corrected on that!).

My focus on this debate, probably because I have kids of my own now playing the game, is the youth and keeping young ones interested in the game.

And it is not a snowflake stance.

What has changed in the past 20/30 years is the choice/lifestyle of youngsters. When we were growing up, did we ever miss a game because we were in Florida for three weeks, or had two family holidays in the summer? Or because we were training for Muy Thai or Jujitsu?
How many mountain bike trails were there? How many of us were allowed to play soccer or rugby?

Case in point, there was one young fella playing for us, great potential, strong as an ox - he is 14, and is now a national gymnastic champion, with no interest in Gaelic whatsoever.

The lives and choices now of teenagers is completely different to when we were growing up, where the first two questions that were asked when our family arrived at our holiday destination, in Connemara or Wicklow, "What time is Mass", and "can we get the Sunday Game on that TV?"

What I fear is a teenager/parent seeing these reports, they are not that attached to the GAA, and they think "feck that, not going to put myself/my son through that".

There is a turf war now for players to keep Gaelic on into their adult careers. This brutal aspect of the game could have serious consequences on our numbers.
"Some people say I am indecisive..... maybe I am, maybe I'm not".

thejuice

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Re: Violence in Adult Club Football
« Reply #29 on: September 17, 2018, 10:58:45 PM »



Iíve never seen nor heard of any violence in Meath football. Itís only when them blaggards from the surrounding counties come and start upsetting the peace do we have to explain it to them in terms theyíll only understand that we donít appreciate that type of thing.
It won't be the next manager but the one after that Meath will become competitive again - MO'D 2016