Author Topic: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh  (Read 20575 times)

An Watcher

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 458
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #90 on: September 13, 2018, 10:04:59 PM »
I'd have Conor Gormley right up there with Peter and above Sean.  No harm to anyone

In hiding

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 549
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #91 on: September 13, 2018, 10:19:41 PM »
Cavanagh is the 2nd best player to wvwr play for Tyrone without question. He was a super talented player but his gripes with Harte is letting his legacy down a bagful. Do Tyrone ones rate him as highly ?

One of Tyrones best ever. Absolutely

trileacman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3403
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #92 on: September 13, 2018, 10:55:11 PM »
Canavan is probably the de jeur answer to that question. There's a fairly strong argument to be made for both big Frank and Stephen O'Neill who when on form were both unplayable. I think O'Neill is the most overlooked of the trio, all 3 had those trademark performances (84, 95 and 05). Cavanagh is certainly up there but the character and personality of Big Frank and Canavan just puts them in another echelon. For me it's something like O'Neill, Canavan, McGuigan, Sean.
Fantasy Rugby World Cup Champion 2011,
Fantasy 6 Nations Champion 2014

Throw ball

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1535
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #93 on: September 14, 2018, 12:23:06 AM »
What about Iggy Jones or Jody O'Neill

Evil Genius

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3978
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #94 on: September 14, 2018, 01:04:17 AM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.
Noticed an reference to this elsewhere, so took a quick look to see what the reaction was on this forum.

Frankly, I'm shocked - though not surprised - that this particular aspect of Cavanagh's book doesn't merit a thread of its own (or at least some comment from more than one or two individuals).

I mean, is no-one else astonished, even outraged, that a team manager could get away with imposing his personal religious leanings on an entire team, to the exclusion of those who may feel differently?

i read a lot of stuff about sledging and foul play etc, but there is at least some possible redress (referee) or comeback (retaliation) to those things, but what can someone on the Tyrone panel who doesn't agree say or do to this? Speak out and never play for the county again?

And all that's BEFORE you get to the context of sport and society in  NI.

Could you imagine the shitstorm if eg the Linfield manager required his players eg to take part in some sort of Orange Order parade, or British armed forces commemoration, or attend a Free Presbyterian service?

It would be roundly and publicly condemned, with the governing body clamping down immediately, and QUITE RIGHTLY too, imo. In fact, it's unthinkable. (And I say that as someone who pretty much despises Linfield, btw).

"GAA For All (Protestants need not apply)"
"If you come in here again, you'd better bring guns"
"We don't need guns"
"Yes you fuckin' do"

Newbridge Exile

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1012
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #95 on: September 14, 2018, 01:07:43 AM »
Canavan is probably the de jeur answer to that question. There's a fairly strong argument to be made for both big Frank and Stephen O'Neill who when on form were both unplayable. I think O'Neill is the most overlooked of the trio, all 3 had those trademark performances (84, 95 and 05). Cavanagh is certainly up there but the character and personality of Big Frank and Canavan just puts them in another echelon. For me it's something like O'Neill, Canavan, McGuigan, Sean.
Eugene McKenna has to be up there too

Fear ón Srath Bán

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8226
    • View Profile
    • Cumann Mhic Sioghair CLG, An Srath Bán
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #96 on: September 14, 2018, 01:50:15 AM »
Canavan is probably the de jeur answer to that question...

De jeur, huh?

Should that be de jure (in law), or de joueur (of a player, though in French)?  :P ;)
Carlsberg don't do Gombeenocracies, but by jaysus if they did...

haranguerer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3104
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #97 on: September 14, 2018, 10:31:18 AM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.
Noticed an reference to this elsewhere, so took a quick look to see what the reaction was on this forum.

Frankly, I'm shocked - though not surprised - that this particular aspect of Cavanagh's book doesn't merit a thread of its own (or at least some comment from more than one or two individuals).

I mean, is no-one else astonished, even outraged, that a team manager could get away with imposing his personal religious leanings on an entire team, to the exclusion of those who may feel differently?

i read a lot of stuff about sledging and foul play etc, but there is at least some possible redress (referee) or comeback (retaliation) to those things, but what can someone on the Tyrone panel who doesn't agree say or do to this? Speak out and never play for the county again?

And all that's BEFORE you get to the context of sport and society in  NI.

Could you imagine the shitstorm if eg the Linfield manager required his players eg to take part in some sort of Orange Order parade, or British armed forces commemoration, or attend a Free Presbyterian service?

It would be roundly and publicly condemned, with the governing body clamping down immediately, and QUITE RIGHTLY too, imo. In fact, it's unthinkable. (And I say that as someone who pretty much despises Linfield, btw).

"GAA For All (Protestants need not apply)"

Those aren't accurate comparisons - I'd say an accurate comparison would be attending a church service, and the comparisons you've chosen are telling about you, but your general point is valid. (On a slight tangent though, weren't Irish league players forced to take part in a ceremony and have an anthem they don't recognise as theirs played as though it were recently??)

I don't see it as a big imposition at all, but nonetheless everyone should have their own free choice - I haven't seen any evidence yet that they didn't. If anyone went to MH and said, I'm not comfortable, do you really think they would have suffered repercussions re selection? I doubt it very much. It would seem noone involved had an issue (Unlike the Irish league example I mentioned earlier actually).

The majority of Irish catholics are brought up with the ritual of mass, when they have their own free choice they'll all attend weddings, funerals, mass at easter/christmas, for whatever reason. A mass before games in this context isn't a big deal. Irish catholicism isn't taken that seriously, its just a routine for many, and I think thats the context it needs to be taken in. its not forcing your religious views onto others, as it is being portrayed.

westbound

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 429
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #98 on: September 14, 2018, 10:49:01 AM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.
Noticed an reference to this elsewhere, so took a quick look to see what the reaction was on this forum.

Frankly, I'm shocked - though not surprised - that this particular aspect of Cavanagh's book doesn't merit a thread of its own (or at least some comment from more than one or two individuals).

I mean, is no-one else astonished, even outraged, that a team manager could get away with imposing his personal religious leanings on an entire team, to the exclusion of those who may feel differently?

i read a lot of stuff about sledging and foul play etc, but there is at least some possible redress (referee) or comeback (retaliation) to those things, but what can someone on the Tyrone panel who doesn't agree say or do to this? Speak out and never play for the county again?

And all that's BEFORE you get to the context of sport and society in  NI.

Could you imagine the shitstorm if eg the Linfield manager required his players eg to take part in some sort of Orange Order parade, or British armed forces commemoration, or attend a Free Presbyterian service?

It would be roundly and publicly condemned, with the governing body clamping down immediately, and QUITE RIGHTLY too, imo. In fact, it's unthinkable. (And I say that as someone who pretty much despises Linfield, btw).

"GAA For All (Protestants need not apply)"

Those aren't accurate comparisons - I'd say an accurate comparison would be attending a church service, and the comparisons you've chosen are telling about you, but your general point is valid. (On a slight tangent though, weren't Irish league players forced to take part in a ceremony and have an anthem they don't recognise as theirs played as though it were recently??)

I don't see it as a big imposition at all, but nonetheless everyone should have their own free choice - I haven't seen any evidence yet that they didn't. If anyone went to MH and said, I'm not comfortable, do you really think they would have suffered repercussions re selection? I doubt it very much. It would seem noone involved had an issue (Unlike the Irish league example I mentioned earlier actually).

The majority of Irish catholics are brought up with the ritual of mass, when they have their own free choice they'll all attend weddings, funerals, mass at easter/christmas, for whatever reason. A mass before games in this context isn't a big deal. Irish catholicism isn't taken that seriously, its just a routine for many, and I think thats the context it needs to be taken in. its not forcing your religious views onto others, as it is being portrayed.

I think you missed the point there.
Most Irish catholics wouldn't have a major problem with it. But What about somebody who isn't catholic? It's a pretty big deal to anyone of any other religion (or no religion).  It could certainly be viewed as 'forcing' your catholic views onto non catholics.
Obviously, we don't know how much 'forcing' was done, but all managers want players to do things as a team. Therefore it's likely that everyone was strongly encouraged to go as a team!


Redhand Santa

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1525
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #99 on: September 14, 2018, 10:55:58 AM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.
Noticed an reference to this elsewhere, so took a quick look to see what the reaction was on this forum.

Frankly, I'm shocked - though not surprised - that this particular aspect of Cavanagh's book doesn't merit a thread of its own (or at least some comment from more than one or two individuals).

I mean, is no-one else astonished, even outraged, that a team manager could get away with imposing his personal religious leanings on an entire team, to the exclusion of those who may feel differently?

i read a lot of stuff about sledging and foul play etc, but there is at least some possible redress (referee) or comeback (retaliation) to those things, but what can someone on the Tyrone panel who doesn't agree say or do to this? Speak out and never play for the county again?

And all that's BEFORE you get to the context of sport and society in  NI.

Could you imagine the shitstorm if eg the Linfield manager required his players eg to take part in some sort of Orange Order parade, or British armed forces commemoration, or attend a Free Presbyterian service?

It would be roundly and publicly condemned, with the governing body clamping down immediately, and QUITE RIGHTLY too, imo. In fact, it's unthinkable. (And I say that as someone who pretty much despises Linfield, btw).

"GAA For All (Protestants need not apply)"

Those aren't accurate comparisons - I'd say an accurate comparison would be attending a church service, and the comparisons you've chosen are telling about you, but your general point is valid. (On a slight tangent though, weren't Irish league players forced to take part in a ceremony and have an anthem they don't recognise as theirs played as though it were recently??)

I don't see it as a big imposition at all, but nonetheless everyone should have their own free choice - I haven't seen any evidence yet that they didn't. If anyone went to MH and said, I'm not comfortable, do you really think they would have suffered repercussions re selection? I doubt it very much. It would seem noone involved had an issue (Unlike the Irish league example I mentioned earlier actually).

The majority of Irish catholics are brought up with the ritual of mass, when they have their own free choice they'll all attend weddings, funerals, mass at easter/christmas, for whatever reason. A mass before games in this context isn't a big deal. Irish catholicism isn't taken that seriously, its just a routine for many, and I think thats the context it needs to be taken in. its not forcing your religious views onto others, as it is being portrayed.

I think you missed the point there.
Most Irish catholics wouldn't have a major problem with it. But What about somebody who isn't catholic? It's a pretty big deal to anyone of any other religion (or no religion).  It could certainly be viewed as 'forcing' your catholic views onto non catholics.
Obviously, we don't know how much 'forcing' was done, but all managers want players to do things as a team. Therefore it's likely that everyone was strongly encouraged to go as a team!

And who on the team isn't Irish or from a catholic background?

haranguerer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3104
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #100 on: September 14, 2018, 11:01:04 AM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.
Noticed an reference to this elsewhere, so took a quick look to see what the reaction was on this forum.

Frankly, I'm shocked - though not surprised - that this particular aspect of Cavanagh's book doesn't merit a thread of its own (or at least some comment from more than one or two individuals).

I mean, is no-one else astonished, even outraged, that a team manager could get away with imposing his personal religious leanings on an entire team, to the exclusion of those who may feel differently?

i read a lot of stuff about sledging and foul play etc, but there is at least some possible redress (referee) or comeback (retaliation) to those things, but what can someone on the Tyrone panel who doesn't agree say or do to this? Speak out and never play for the county again?

And all that's BEFORE you get to the context of sport and society in  NI.

Could you imagine the shitstorm if eg the Linfield manager required his players eg to take part in some sort of Orange Order parade, or British armed forces commemoration, or attend a Free Presbyterian service?

It would be roundly and publicly condemned, with the governing body clamping down immediately, and QUITE RIGHTLY too, imo. In fact, it's unthinkable. (And I say that as someone who pretty much despises Linfield, btw).

"GAA For All (Protestants need not apply)"

Those aren't accurate comparisons - I'd say an accurate comparison would be attending a church service, and the comparisons you've chosen are telling about you, but your general point is valid. (On a slight tangent though, weren't Irish league players forced to take part in a ceremony and have an anthem they don't recognise as theirs played as though it were recently??)

I don't see it as a big imposition at all, but nonetheless everyone should have their own free choice - I haven't seen any evidence yet that they didn't. If anyone went to MH and said, I'm not comfortable, do you really think they would have suffered repercussions re selection? I doubt it very much. It would seem noone involved had an issue (Unlike the Irish league example I mentioned earlier actually).

The majority of Irish catholics are brought up with the ritual of mass, when they have their own free choice they'll all attend weddings, funerals, mass at easter/christmas, for whatever reason. A mass before games in this context isn't a big deal. Irish catholicism isn't taken that seriously, its just a routine for many, and I think thats the context it needs to be taken in. its not forcing your religious views onto others, as it is being portrayed.

I think you missed the point there.
Most Irish catholics wouldn't have a major problem with it. But What about somebody who isn't catholic? It's a pretty big deal to anyone of any other religion (or no religion).  It could certainly be viewed as 'forcing' your catholic views onto non catholics.
Obviously, we don't know how much 'forcing' was done, but all managers want players to do things as a team. Therefore it's likely that everyone was strongly encouraged to go as a team!

I'm not missing the point. The players were all from a catholic background. The hypothetical situation you describe didn't occur. If it had, I'm sure it would have been dealt with in the proper manner. MH would of course have been aware of the situation and adjusted accordingly. He is there to build bonds and win matches, not convert people to catholicism.

At the end of the day, this was something willingly partaken in by a group of people comfortable with the environment they were in. What we now have is people outside that environment theorising about what took place, or could have took place, or how players probably weren't comfortable but weren't able to say anything....none of which I believe for a second.

And of course, it could be noted that if there was an issue the captain should surely be the person to bring that up with the management team at the time. Instead he sniped about it later, and hasn't chosen to point out that everyone seemed satisfied with the arrangement (if there'd been any murmurings you can bet he'd have written about them!)

trailer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 793
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #101 on: September 14, 2018, 11:03:24 AM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.
Noticed an reference to this elsewhere, so took a quick look to see what the reaction was on this forum.

Frankly, I'm shocked - though not surprised - that this particular aspect of Cavanagh's book doesn't merit a thread of its own (or at least some comment from more than one or two individuals).

I mean, is no-one else astonished, even outraged, that a team manager could get away with imposing his personal religious leanings on an entire team, to the exclusion of those who may feel differently?

i read a lot of stuff about sledging and foul play etc, but there is at least some possible redress (referee) or comeback (retaliation) to those things, but what can someone on the Tyrone panel who doesn't agree say or do to this? Speak out and never play for the county again?

And all that's BEFORE you get to the context of sport and society in  NI.

Could you imagine the shitstorm if eg the Linfield manager required his players eg to take part in some sort of Orange Order parade, or British armed forces commemoration, or attend a Free Presbyterian service?

It would be roundly and publicly condemned, with the governing body clamping down immediately, and QUITE RIGHTLY too, imo. In fact, it's unthinkable. (And I say that as someone who pretty much despises Linfield, btw).

"GAA For All (Protestants need not apply)"

This is not a fair equivalence

Crusaders FC are well known for their Christianity indeed some players are 'Saved' I believe this also includes in the Manager.

Catholics pray - shocker.

haranguerer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3104
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #102 on: September 14, 2018, 11:10:00 AM »
Thats not a fair comparison either - that sounds a personal choice and practice, unless the dressing room collectively were led in prayer by some of these individuals.

Jinxy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12333
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #103 on: September 14, 2018, 11:14:07 AM »
I always wondered how the whole praying before/after games in the dressing-room thing works in American Football, given that there are quite a few muslim players in the NFL.
If you were any use you'd be playing.

trailer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 793
    • View Profile
Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« Reply #104 on: September 14, 2018, 11:27:31 AM »
Thats not a fair comparison either - that sounds a personal choice and practice, unless the dressing room collectively were led in prayer by some of these individuals.

Indeed it's not. That why I wrote it.
"Crusaders are still known for their Christian ethos. A quarter of the dressing room have connections with the Evangelical churches that pepper north Belfast"
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/41692565

But it's personal choice in the Tyrone dressing room as well, yet Evil Genius attacks this saying it's a cold house for Protestants.
This all comes back to one thing and one thing only. Protestants in NI have an in built belief that they are superior and better than Catholics. It manifested itself in the discrimination of Catholics since the formation of NI and has since manifested itself in the DUP's failure to provide good government in NI and their laise faire attitude to equality.
This is the root of every single Protestant attack on the GAA.