Poll

Is it right that Dublin got 7 million to implement a plan to dominate the GAA World?

Yes
41 (28.5%)
No
103 (71.5%)

Total Members Voted: 144

Author Topic: Time to Split Dublin  (Read 46830 times)

The Hill is Blue

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Re: Time to Split Dublin
« Reply #765 on: September 19, 2018, 12:09:08 AM »
A couple of questions - whatís a ďnormalĒ county and are you saying that the likes of Kerry, Mayo, Tyrone etc will never be able to compete with Dublin again?

A normal county is one within striking distance of the average population and where football is fairly popular, rather than only hurling.
Some of these counties will compete with Dublin some years, but that doesn't change the unfairness of the situation.

If youíre a county that can compete then compete. Otherwise amalgamate.
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Syferus

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Re: Time to Split Dublin
« Reply #766 on: September 19, 2018, 12:14:44 AM »
A couple of questions - whatís a ďnormalĒ county and are you saying that the likes of Kerry, Mayo, Tyrone etc will never be able to compete with Dublin again?

A normal county is one within striking distance of the average population and where football is fairly popular, rather than only hurling.
Some of these counties will compete with Dublin some years, but that doesn't change the unfairness of the situation.

If youíre a county that can compete then compete. Otherwise amalgamate.

Youíre about as genuine a debater as Fox Commander or that WUM account in the Mayo LGFA thread.

TheGreatest

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Re: Time to Split Dublin
« Reply #767 on: September 19, 2018, 11:23:29 AM »
A couple of questions - whatís a ďnormalĒ county and are you saying that the likes of Kerry, Mayo, Tyrone etc will never be able to compete with Dublin again?

A normal county is one within striking distance of the average population and where football is fairly popular, rather than only hurling.
Some of these counties will compete with Dublin some years, but that doesn't change the unfairness of the situation.

If youíre a county that can compete then compete. Otherwise amalgamate.

100%, talks of slitting teams up because of success is cheap talk, loser talk, defeatist. Sligo, Leitrim could be a good example and could work.

Lar Naparka

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Re: Time to Split Dublin
« Reply #768 on: September 19, 2018, 06:32:04 PM »
The basic point here is that an increasing population requires the State to sub divide counties in Dublin.  Are those who defend Dublin arguing that the GAA should simply ignore an increasing population imbalance, no matter how great it becomes?

How about amalgamating counties who feel they canít compete?
If the only reason for amalgamating a number of counties would be to field the strongest senior team for the new entity, then the move would probably be a positive one.

But if thatís the only reason to do so, there are many others than that would damage the best interests of the GAA and that's putting it mildly.
For starters, if, say, three counties come together there would then be just one county board where there were three before the amalgamation.
A lot of  intercounty players would lose out as there would now be only one intercounty panel instead of three. The numbers playing at club level in any grade would also be dramatically reduced for the same reason.
Clubs would also have to amalgamate in order to survive and to do so, would cause other problems. In most rural areas, there is a strong bond between a club and the local community. The Parish Rule is very important for those clubs.
This rule has its own drawbacks but, on the whole, itís the main reason for the existence of those clubs in the first place.
If clubs are forced to amalgamate in order to survive, the bond between each club and it main support base would no longer exist. Boys (or girls also) would be less willing to join any club if itís located in another parish and they know few if any those already there.
And to cap it all, there's another snag that most Jackeens probably never have heard of.
Thereís usually a lot of animosity between adjoining parishes and that has been the ways for generations, certainly long before the GAA was founded.
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Farrandeelin

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Re: Time to Split Dublin
« Reply #769 on: September 23, 2018, 12:33:51 PM »
The basic point here is that an increasing population requires the State to sub divide counties in Dublin.  Are those who defend Dublin arguing that the GAA should simply ignore an increasing population imbalance, no matter how great it becomes?

How about amalgamating counties who feel they canít compete?
If the only reason for amalgamating a number of counties would be to field the strongest senior team for the new entity, then the move would probably be a positive one.

But if thatís the only reason to do so, there are many others than that would damage the best interests of the GAA and that's putting it mildly.
For starters, if, say, three counties come together there would then be just one county board where there were three before the amalgamation.
A lot of  intercounty players would lose out as there would now be only one intercounty panel instead of three. The numbers playing at club level in any grade would also be dramatically reduced for the same reason.
Clubs would also have to amalgamate in order to survive and to do so, would cause other problems. In most rural areas, there is a strong bond between a club and the local community. The Parish Rule is very important for those clubs.
This rule has its own drawbacks but, on the whole, itís the main reason for the existence of those clubs in the first place.
If clubs are forced to amalgamate in order to survive, the bond between each club and it main support base would no longer exist. Boys (or girls also) would be less willing to join any club if itís located in another parish and they know few if any those already there.
And to cap it all, there's another snag that most Jackeens probably never have heard of.
Thereís usually a lot of animosity between adjoining parishes and that has been the ways for generations, certainly long before the GAA was founded.

Well said Lar, parish rule, despite its drawbacks is keeping smaller clubs, such as Kilfian, Moygownagh and Lacken from North Mayo alive despite underage amalgamations. Also I'm heading to see one of the biggest rivalries, my own club and Crossmolina within in Ballina in a relegation playoff. There's certainly no love lost between the two teams.  :D
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