Author Topic: Gaelic Football on TV  (Read 1940 times)

Bud Wiser

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2017, 07:25:41 PM »
Doooooom and gloooooom.
If you don't like it away with ya.
Only for your own county bate Galway you would want to put Rachel Doherty on the team to attract a crowd.
" Laois ? You can't drink pints of Guinness and talk sh*te in a pub, and then play football"

Rossfan

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2017, 07:28:10 PM »
She'd be useless under a high ball.
2016 - Hurling League Champions, Football League Semi finalists

Redhand Santa

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2017, 07:29:01 PM »
On another note how come any time there's a poor game in football do hurling fans feel the need to bring up hurling? Is it an inferiority thing because it's less popular than football? I found both The Munster and Leinster hurling  finals boring but never would have thought of slagging them off or go on about football.

weareros

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2017, 08:35:48 PM »
The typical commentary on Gaelic Football is like 1950s sermons by the Catholic Church. The holier than thous are not happy until they can highlight salacious and sinful acts, and morally depraved behaviour. Thankfully I was at the Connacht football final but I read in Tommy Conlon's column that the first question that Michael Lyster asked Pat Spillane at half time  is this what you call puke football. The thing is there was some wonderful football played in what are typically difficult conditions in Salt-hill, including what will be a contender for goal of the year. There's been some great stuff in this championship, and some mediocre stuff - no different to most years. But the commentators have a Jesus Christ ideal, a purity that most games can never live up to, so the analysis has to be about where the sinners are going wrong. The faithful eventually stop listening.

Lar Naparka

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #19 on: July 17, 2017, 11:20:09 PM »
Over 100,000 attended 4 football games over the weekend.
Th'oul game is finished alright.

66,000 of which attended Dublin's latest execution. The 18,000 in Salthill was pitiful.

The sport is in serious decline.

It sure is. It was inevitable that this would happen.
If I had to come up with one word to describe the reason for the game’s decline, it would be money.
Money to pay for world class facilities, plus a greater number of backup personnel than on the players’ panel. They all cost money and loads of it. To stump up the money needed, the GAA in any county must turn to its sponsors.
Sponsors tend to be hard headed business individuals. They are in the sponsorship business because it suits their commercial ends. You could go on and on with hard luck stories but one fact is central to the problems facing the GAA as a whole and that is the wherewithal to keep a team on the road.
Because Dublin can afford a professional setup. Others will try and keep in touch by spending money they can’t afford to spend. It has a trickle down effect as every county finds itself spending more  and training harder in order to stay still.
So you have players dropping off county panels, especially in counties with no realistic hopes of winning any silverware. Spectators can give out yards about defensive football and yearn for a return to the ‘good ol’ days’  and all of that baloney but the reasons for puke football can’t be levelled at the players.
Given the amount of training and other team preparation they are expected to put in, players and managers are motivated by the fear of losing and if packing 15 players in the small square for 90% of the time seems to be the best chance of not losing, then so be it.
LIke I said before, the Dubs can’t be blamed for all of football’s ills. Too many counties are determined not to accept change in any form and that is as much a problem as is Dublin’s superiority in just about every facet of the game.

Esmarelda

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2017, 02:38:46 PM »
Whether there are 60 or 60,000 at a game it doesn't make any difference, the "game" is finished, you might get away with teams like Tipperary, Dublin or Roscommon brand of football for another while but the most ye will get out of it is a few years.  Anyone who could watch an hour of Tyrone and Down is either a die hard fan or a masochist but I doubt if anyone lost a bit of their fingernails watching the excitement on TV.  Black cards, yellow cards, red cards, and hawkeye to see the size of a jaysus football because as big as it is an umpire cant see it.

The goalkeeper kicks out the ball to the twenty meter line and ye all gallop after it, passing it to each other like children out playing in a hay field after the grass getting cut.  And the referee, the poor referee, laden down with cards and watches and earpieces trying to keep up and him with his head filled with the idea that the first player he sees touching another player he will send him home with a big wave of a card then held high up over his head that you would feel sorry that all he is short of is a gun.  Peter McKenna should build a running track around the pitch and let the two teams start of in opposite directions and whoever completes ten laps first is the winner because there are teams winning finals now that have not kicked a ball over the bar from outside the 45 in an entire season.
I assume this post is, at least partially, tongue in cheek?

From the Bunker

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2017, 02:43:16 PM »
Whether there are 60 or 60,000 at a game it doesn't make any difference, the "game" is finished, you might get away with teams like Tipperary, Dublin or Roscommon brand of football for another while but the most ye will get out of it is a few years.  Anyone who could watch an hour of Tyrone and Down is either a die hard fan or a masochist but I doubt if anyone lost a bit of their fingernails watching the excitement on TV.  Black cards, yellow cards, red cards, and hawkeye to see the size of a jaysus football because as big as it is an umpire cant see it.

The goalkeeper kicks out the ball to the twenty meter line and ye all gallop after it, passing it to each other like children out playing in a hay field after the grass getting cut.  And the referee, the poor referee, laden down with cards and watches and earpieces trying to keep up and him with his head filled with the idea that the first player he sees touching another player he will send him home with a big wave of a card then held high up over his head that you would feel sorry that all he is short of is a gun.  Peter McKenna should build a running track around the pitch and let the two teams start of in opposite directions and whoever completes ten laps first is the winner because there are teams winning finals now that have not kicked a ball over the bar from outside the 45 in an entire season.

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Bud Wiser

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #22 on: July 20, 2017, 08:18:41 PM »
At least the lads down in Ferbane can see the funny side of it.
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Hardy

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #23 on: July 21, 2017, 12:46:53 AM »
 ;D
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DickyRock

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #24 on: July 21, 2017, 07:58:04 AM »
The black card isn't perfect but a bigger problem is the GAA public's inability to read and take in the rules as they are clearly written.

The public cannot understand the rules if referees apply them differently all the time. This and letting the "game flow" is leading to confusion and frustration amongst supporters and players. Apply the rules as stated and after a year of higher frustration things will get better.

Bud Wiser

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #25 on: August 06, 2017, 10:44:22 AM »
Well? What do all the diehards think of what was served up yesterday in the name of “football”?  Ye will probably say ye were stuck to your seats watching it because one would want t be bolted into a torture chair to endure the loss of that seven life hours to anyone who persisted. It was only on Sky Sports though, the idea I believe being that Sennan Connell standing “pitch-side” with a pair of headphones on him like a Martian (be there such a thing) was  for the purpose of bringing the excitement of our national sport to the masses in all corners of the world.

The reality of course is that people in Canada and other countries will now be on YouTube asking how can they help those poor eejits in Ireland if this is the quarter finals of our national sport and all we have for excitement?  There was one clipe on YouTube where they watched a “hurling match” and they thought “Oh look, they have men in white coats, doctors, at each side of the posts to deal with the injured”. Don’t be surprised if some self-elected Lord Mayor in some town in Africa or Brazil sends a donation to Loose Lips Leo thinking that the men in the white coats yesterday were volunteers from some asylum to take away those who realised they have paid over €500 to get a family to, and into Croke Park to endure what was top of the bill on Sky Sports only.

Still, I suppose if you look at it from the nostalgic side you could convince yourself “I was there that day when the record was set” kind of like myself who carries the morbid thought of remembering exactly where I was when President Kennedy was shot stone dead even though I was only 13 at the time, I even still wonder what he was doing in Texas in the first place.  Depending on which record you are talking about of course.  Stephen Cluxton, the only goalkeeper in the world to play 89 games of senior football for his county in which he took 2,225 kick outs that went less than 30 yards.  (We won’t mention the frees he had to travel and take because the boys at the other end on the protein diets  hadn’t the ability to put the ball on the ground and kick it over the bar from 40 yards until they sourced a dedicated free taker.

I remember Dessie Farrell with a buckled knee kicking a ball wide in Croke Park one day and a wag shouting at him, “Is that what you want a hundred pound a week for” but players like Farrell gave it their all. People actually paid into Croke Park to see if Ciaran Whelan was going to get one on the chin ( never going to happen –there is Stradballly Laois blood there)  in the same way as people who pay into Mondello Park head straight for the bend at Duckhams where the worst crash and where someone was most likely to be killed would happen.  The Dessies, the Jayo’s and the Joe McNallys were exciting to watch even if they were only playing on their own.  Back then it was football with kicks and thumps and above all, a bit of banter and excitement. 

The only thing the GAA can depend on to provide excitement in what is left of this years championship is a bus load of Syrian refugees arriving from Ballaghadreen on Monday.  That or Colm Parkinson turning out in a Mayo jersey wearing a nose ring and making a claim that he was born in Castlebar to a mixed marriage between a Norman and a Viking.  Warnings should be issued before GAA football is shown on TV.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2017, 12:34:22 PM by Bud Wiser »
" Laois ? You can't drink pints of Guinness and talk sh*te in a pub, and then play football"

macdanger2

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #26 on: August 06, 2017, 10:50:38 AM »
Do you only post here to whinge? Seriously, why bother?

DuffleKing

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #27 on: August 06, 2017, 01:34:44 PM »

Bud, you seem to prefer Soccer which is played over a much longer timeframe with far less scores. One can only assume that you have an appreciation for teamwork, defensive shape, attacking guile, creativity, athletic attributes, player skills, decision making, etc, to keep you enthralled for 90 minutes plus where you might see no scores?

If that is in any way accurate, how come you can't apply your learned eye to modern football? In my recent experience of the - ahem - grown up generation this is because they are institutionalised to a previous version of the game which promoted aggression and some skill but not thought, a collective application and any concept that the skills could be developed and honed to the level they are now.

Bud Wiser

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2017, 03:15:58 PM »
Edge of the seat stuff again - not.   Need for more men in white coats.
" Laois ? You can't drink pints of Guinness and talk sh*te in a pub, and then play football"

SCFC

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Re: Gaelic Football on TV
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2017, 06:14:35 PM »
Is someone making you watch this sport you detest? How cruel of them.