Author Topic: Money, Dublin and the GAA  (Read 165190 times)

Jinxy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12333
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #165 on: November 14, 2016, 11:50:29 AM »
Didn't Brigids do their best to throw a spanner in the works when Castleknock were trying to get established?
If you were any use you'd be playing.

Hound

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6036
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #166 on: November 14, 2016, 03:25:24 PM »
GAA should be about providing games for as many people as possible

super clubs don't do that
Why would you say that?

Super clubs have more teams, so everyone still gets to play. And when grading happens at around U12 or U13 (not sure exactly), then you're more likely to be graded at a level that suits you (whereas in a smaller club, you could be a great lad in a poor team, or a plodder in a good team). Still, having always been involved in a smaller club I wouldnt want to be with one of the super clubs, but don't think there's anything wrong with them per se.


muppet

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 25083
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #167 on: November 14, 2016, 03:48:34 PM »
GAA should be about providing games for as many people as possible

super clubs don't do that
Why would you say that?

Super clubs have more teams, so everyone still gets to play. And when grading happens at around U12 or U13 (not sure exactly), then you're more likely to be graded at a level that suits you (whereas in a smaller club, you could be a great lad in a poor team, or a plodder in a good team). Still, having always been involved in a smaller club I wouldnt want to be with one of the super clubs, but don't think there's anything wrong with them per se.

Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels often keep lads involved who improve later, that might otherwise have quit in a one team set-up.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2016, 03:50:58 PM by muppet »
MWWSI 2017

Croí na hÉireann

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4785
  • There's Always Next Year...
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #168 on: November 14, 2016, 04:10:58 PM »
GAA should be about providing games for as many people as possible

super clubs don't do that
Why would you say that?

Super clubs have more teams, so everyone still gets to play. And when grading happens at around U12 or U13 (not sure exactly), then you're more likely to be graded at a level that suits you (whereas in a smaller club, you could be a great lad in a poor team, or a plodder in a good team). Still, having always been involved in a smaller club I wouldnt want to be with one of the super clubs, but don't think there's anything wrong with them per se.

Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels often keep lads involved who improve later, that might otherwise have quit in a one team set-up.

In agreement with the two lads, "super clubs" will provide as many panels as their numbers allow. If their membership base increases significantly they will add another junior team. If they loose too many bodies they will take the bottom team out. There are pros and cons to both "super clubs" and the more traditional 1 or 2 team clubs.
Westmeath - Home of the Christy Ring Cup...

Croí na hÉireann

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4785
  • There's Always Next Year...
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #169 on: November 14, 2016, 04:12:31 PM »
Didn't Brigids do their best to throw a spanner in the works when Castleknock were trying to get established?

http://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/gaelic-football/castleknock-gaa-knocking-on-heaven-s-door-1.2855300
Westmeath - Home of the Christy Ring Cup...

Shamrock Shore

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5246
  • We are proud to be Larries
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #170 on: November 14, 2016, 04:38:47 PM »
St. Vincents are off to play Mullinalaghta in Longford Sunday week.

The entire population of Mullinalaghta is 447. I would say the backroom staff in Vincents is around that number.

We'll see if their United Nations team with €€€€€€€€€€ attached compete  ;)

Rossfan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16866
  • Ballaghaderreen CO ROSCOMMON
    • View Profile
    • Roscommon County Board official website
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #171 on: November 14, 2016, 04:43:54 PM »
Good one Sham  :D ;D
Still Connacht Champions

Jinxy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12333
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #172 on: November 14, 2016, 04:48:38 PM »
One thing is for sure, Mullinalaghta won't fear St. Vincents.
If you were any use you'd be playing.

muppet

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 25083
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #173 on: November 15, 2016, 01:28:40 AM »
St. Vincents are off to play Mullinalaghta in Longford Sunday week.

The entire population of Mullinalaghta is 447. I would say the backroom staff in Vincents is around that number.

We'll see if their United Nations team with €€€€€€€€€€ attached compete  ;)

In fairness, that's a great age.
MWWSI 2017

Lar Naparka

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4346
  • I just know this is gonna be our year!
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #174 on: November 15, 2016, 11:31:02 AM »
GAA should be about providing games for as many people as possible

super clubs don't do that
Why would you say that?

Super clubs have more teams, so everyone still gets to play. And when grading happens at around U12 or U13 (not sure exactly), then you're more likely to be graded at a level that suits you (whereas in a smaller club, you could be a great lad in a poor team, or a plodder in a good team). Still, having always been involved in a smaller club I wouldnt want to be with one of the super clubs, but don't think there's anything wrong with them per se.

Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels often keep lads involved who improve later, that might otherwise have quit in a one team set-up.
??
Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels will shed kids big time as they get older and the numbers of teams fielded decreases as they move up to higher levels.
Sure, some youngsters will drop out due to a variety of reasons and this is true of all sports but in GA  clubs with huge numbers of kids in the lower grades to start off with, will be forced to drop those who don’t make the cut.
One club I have been associated with can field up to a half dozen teams at u9s/u10s level without a bother but, ASAIK, have only two teams at u15 level. (Been a while since I was involved but I’ve n reason to believe that things are different now.)
I’ve seen many youngsters being terribly upset when told there wasn’t a place for them anymore.
Soccer in contrast can have clubs with only a pitch loaned by the city council and a disused 40 foot container to get going.
No wonder that a far higher % of children play soccer than Gaelic.
Nil Carborundum Illegitemi

Croí na hÉireann

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4785
  • There's Always Next Year...
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #175 on: November 15, 2016, 02:45:25 PM »
GAA should be about providing games for as many people as possible

super clubs don't do that
Why would you say that?

Super clubs have more teams, so everyone still gets to play. And when grading happens at around U12 or U13 (not sure exactly), then you're more likely to be graded at a level that suits you (whereas in a smaller club, you could be a great lad in a poor team, or a plodder in a good team). Still, having always been involved in a smaller club I wouldnt want to be with one of the super clubs, but don't think there's anything wrong with them per se.

Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels often keep lads involved who improve later, that might otherwise have quit in a one team set-up.
??
Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels will shed kids big time as they get older and the numbers of teams fielded decreases as they move up to higher levels.
Sure, some youngsters will drop out due to a variety of reasons and this is true of all sports but in GA  clubs with huge numbers of kids in the lower grades to start off with, will be forced to drop those who don’t make the cut.
One club I have been associated with can field up to a half dozen teams at u9s/u10s level without a bother but, ASAIK, have only two teams at u15 level. (Been a while since I was involved but I’ve n reason to believe that things are different now.)
I’ve seen many youngsters being terribly upset when told there wasn’t a place for them anymore.
Soccer in contrast can have clubs with only a pitch loaned by the city council and a disused 40 foot container to get going.
No wonder that a far higher % of children play soccer than Gaelic.

GAA clubs lease pitches from councils and use containers as well. That's a shocking policy that club followed, I'd say they're in dire straits now because of it.
Westmeath - Home of the Christy Ring Cup...

muppet

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 25083
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #176 on: November 15, 2016, 04:59:38 PM »
GAA should be about providing games for as many people as possible

super clubs don't do that
Why would you say that?

Super clubs have more teams, so everyone still gets to play. And when grading happens at around U12 or U13 (not sure exactly), then you're more likely to be graded at a level that suits you (whereas in a smaller club, you could be a great lad in a poor team, or a plodder in a good team). Still, having always been involved in a smaller club I wouldnt want to be with one of the super clubs, but don't think there's anything wrong with them per se.

Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels often keep lads involved who improve later, that might otherwise have quit in a one team set-up.
??
Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels will shed kids big time as they get older and the numbers of teams fielded decreases as they move up to higher levels.
Sure, some youngsters will drop out due to a variety of reasons and this is true of all sports but in GA  clubs with huge numbers of kids in the lower grades to start off with, will be forced to drop those who don’t make the cut.
One club I have been associated with can field up to a half dozen teams at u9s/u10s level without a bother but, ASAIK, have only two teams at u15 level. (Been a while since I was involved but I’ve n reason to believe that things are different now.)
I’ve seen many youngsters being terribly upset when told there wasn’t a place for them anymore.
Soccer in contrast can have clubs with only a pitch loaned by the city council and a disused 40 foot container to get going.
No wonder that a far higher % of children play soccer than Gaelic.

GAA clubs lease pitches from councils and use containers as well. That's a shocking policy that club followed, I'd say they're in dire straits now because of it.

Agreed.
MWWSI 2017

Lar Naparka

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4346
  • I just know this is gonna be our year!
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #177 on: November 15, 2016, 10:27:02 PM »
GAA should be about providing games for as many people as possible

super clubs don't do that
Why would you say that?

Super clubs have more teams, so everyone still gets to play. And when grading happens at around U12 or U13 (not sure exactly), then you're more likely to be graded at a level that suits you (whereas in a smaller club, you could be a great lad in a poor team, or a plodder in a good team). Still, having always been involved in a smaller club I wouldnt want to be with one of the super clubs, but don't think there's anything wrong with them per se.

Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels often keep lads involved who improve later, that might otherwise have quit in a one team set-up.
??
Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels will shed kids big time as they get older and the numbers of teams fielded decreases as they move up to higher levels.
Sure, some youngsters will drop out due to a variety of reasons and this is true of all sports but in GA  clubs with huge numbers of kids in the lower grades to start off with, will be forced to drop those who don’t make the cut.
One club I have been associated with can field up to a half dozen teams at u9s/u10s level without a bother but, ASAIK, have only two teams at u15 level. (Been a while since I was involved but I’ve n reason to believe that things are different now.)
I’ve seen many youngsters being terribly upset when told there wasn’t a place for them anymore.
Soccer in contrast can have clubs with only a pitch loaned by the city council and a disused 40 foot container to get going.
No wonder that a far higher % of children play soccer than Gaelic.

GAA clubs lease pitches from councils and use containers as well. That's a shocking policy that club followed, I'd say they're in dire straits now because of it.

But that’s the policy all very large clubs follow; there is no other feasible one. In my personal experience anyway, the vast majority of children that join a GAA club does so through their school. The vast majority will be gone by their Junior Cert year. 
Some would drop out anyway, as happens in other sports but most leave because they can no longer get a place on a team.
Nil Carborundum Illegitemi

blast05

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 997
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #178 on: November 15, 2016, 11:12:21 PM »
Quote
No wonder that a far higher % of children play soccer than Gaelic.

Where is this?
It is certainly not the case where i live.... 'west' Westmeath. Far more GAA clubs than soccer clubs and typically far greater numbers in those GAA clubs than in soccer clubs.
Membership price is hurting the underage soccer though ..... my local GAA club has a family membership cost of €100 which includes a weekly club lotto entry. The local soccer club has a membership cost for my young fella of €105

Croí na hÉireann

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4785
  • There's Always Next Year...
    • View Profile
Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« Reply #179 on: November 16, 2016, 11:26:31 AM »
GAA should be about providing games for as many people as possible

super clubs don't do that
Why would you say that?

Super clubs have more teams, so everyone still gets to play. And when grading happens at around U12 or U13 (not sure exactly), then you're more likely to be graded at a level that suits you (whereas in a smaller club, you could be a great lad in a poor team, or a plodder in a good team). Still, having always been involved in a smaller club I wouldnt want to be with one of the super clubs, but don't think there's anything wrong with them per se.

Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels often keep lads involved who improve later, that might otherwise have quit in a one team set-up.
??
Clubs with multiple teams at lower levels will shed kids big time as they get older and the numbers of teams fielded decreases as they move up to higher levels.
Sure, some youngsters will drop out due to a variety of reasons and this is true of all sports but in GA  clubs with huge numbers of kids in the lower grades to start off with, will be forced to drop those who don’t make the cut.
One club I have been associated with can field up to a half dozen teams at u9s/u10s level without a bother but, ASAIK, have only two teams at u15 level. (Been a while since I was involved but I’ve n reason to believe that things are different now.)
I’ve seen many youngsters being terribly upset when told there wasn’t a place for them anymore.
Soccer in contrast can have clubs with only a pitch loaned by the city council and a disused 40 foot container to get going.
No wonder that a far higher % of children play soccer than Gaelic.

GAA clubs lease pitches from councils and use containers as well. That's a shocking policy that club followed, I'd say they're in dire straits now because of it.

But that’s the policy all very large clubs follow; there is no other feasible one. In my personal experience anyway, the vast majority of children that join a GAA club does so through their school. The vast majority will be gone by their Junior Cert year. 
Some would drop out anyway, as happens in other sports but most leave because they can no longer get a place on a team.

To the best of my knowledge Lar, the way all "super clubs" operate is they supply as many teams as their numbers cater for. Kids drop out of sports all the time unfortunately, they loose interest or want to try something else and GAA is no different. I'm shocked at your example above, I presume it was done due to lack of space/pitches? There's no doubt they drove away kids who in time would have been club stalwarts. I'd wager any money they are in a worse position now than when they enacted this policy, they are certainly the exception to the way the "super clubs" operate.
Westmeath - Home of the Christy Ring Cup...