Author Topic: Brexit.  (Read 601862 times)

markl121

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8580 on: October 17, 2019, 11:10:37 AM »
It's a deal.

Am I mistaken in thinking the DUP 10 votes are probably irrelevant since the overwhelming amount of UK MPs wanted a deal?

Depending on the make up and text obviously, but shouldn't it get through if vaguely acceptable?

From what I've read, the right wing of the Tories won't accept a deal unless the DUP are happy with it. So they have more power than their 10 seats would suggest.
Yeah as far as I know there are tory and maybe even some labour brexiteers who will align to whatever the DUP want.

seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8581 on: October 17, 2019, 11:11:36 AM »
It's a deal.

Am I mistaken in thinking the DUP 10 votes are probably irrelevant since the overwhelming amount of UK MPs wanted a deal?

Depending on the make up and text obviously, but shouldn't it get through if vaguely acceptable?
not if there is divergence away from EU standards on labour and food.
Lookit

GetOverTheBar

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8582 on: October 17, 2019, 11:15:47 AM »
It's a deal.

Am I mistaken in thinking the DUP 10 votes are probably irrelevant since the overwhelming amount of UK MPs wanted a deal?

Depending on the make up and text obviously, but shouldn't it get through if vaguely acceptable?

From what I've read, the right wing of the Tories won't accept a deal unless the DUP are happy with it. So they have more power than their 10 seats would suggest.
Yeah as far as I know there are tory and maybe even some labour brexiteers who will align to whatever the DUP want.

Perhaps the Labour crossover support can neutralise that?

Suppose the real politics only starts now.

t_mac

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8583 on: October 17, 2019, 11:24:53 AM »
Swinson and Corbyn rejecting it out of hand, Boris will need the tory rebels, and Labour MP's defying the whip.

mouview

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8584 on: October 17, 2019, 11:25:24 AM »
It's a deal.

Am I mistaken in thinking the DUP 10 votes are probably irrelevant since the overwhelming amount of UK MPs wanted a deal?

Depending on the make up and text obviously, but shouldn't it get through if vaguely acceptable?

From what I've read, the right wing of the Tories won't accept a deal unless the DUP are happy with it. So they have more power than their 10 seats would suggest.
Yeah as far as I know there are tory and maybe even some labour brexiteers who will align to whatever the DUP want.

Sod all from Labour I'd say, bar that poisonous witch Kate Hoey. Hard-line Tories won't back the DUP, they'll fling them under the autobus in case they find themselves thrown there. Going to be a fair battle now to attach a 2nd ref. to it through the HoC.

t_mac

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8585 on: October 17, 2019, 11:36:02 AM »
It wouldn't matter what deal Tories came back with Libs, SNP, Labour would vote it down.

t_mac

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8586 on: October 17, 2019, 11:42:15 AM »
Northern Ireland Assembly - which doesn't sit given a big role!

screenexile

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8587 on: October 17, 2019, 11:42:43 AM »
In fairness to Boris he's gone all in now!

If the deal doesn't pass Parliament he has to go for the extension and the General Election.

If that's the case he can't run on a No Deal platform he'll have to campaign on his deal which brings the Brexit Party into play! They haven't said it yet but there's no way they're going for it which rules out an election pact.

The numbers in the commons is key he's currently -45 votes ... there's a good chance he'll get a chunk of the 21 back but can he convince enough Labour MP's to go for it and can he talk the DUP round??

I'm waiting for someone with more knowledge of the detail to confirm it to me but does anyone know what exactly this means for the North??

t_mac

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8588 on: October 17, 2019, 11:50:38 AM »
https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta-political/files/revised_withdrawal_agreement_including_protocol_on_ireland_and_nothern_ireland.pdf

Looks like a de facto border down the Irish Sea during the transition period and if transition rolls on and on then the assembly have a vote every 4 years, which simply needs a one vote majority so no one party can veto.  NI aligned to EU single market in the interim.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2019, 11:59:29 AM by t_mac »

WT4E

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8589 on: October 17, 2019, 11:53:15 AM »
Sounds like the deal breaker for DUP is that us caffffflics have a say in what happens - they wanted a DUP veto

Lets be honest those planters that arrived and stole the land really are bunch of scumbags!!!!!

t_mac

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8590 on: October 17, 2019, 11:57:54 AM »
Johnston is to ask EU to reaffirm that it is this deal or no deal, so the Benn Act becomes obsolete.

The Trap

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8591 on: October 17, 2019, 12:02:01 PM »
Is anybody asking in DUP/UDA what happens next????

If the deal is presented to parliament and is rejected and Boris has to ask for an extension and a GE then he ain't going to campaign for support in Scotland and NI. He will go to England and Wales and ask for support to carry on without Scotland and NI and promote that fact that NI costs them more than the EU.

The voters will say F**k NI and the DUP, we don't want them holding us back.

Aaron Boone

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8592 on: October 17, 2019, 12:05:40 PM »
In fairness to Boris he's gone all in now!

If the deal doesn't pass Parliament he has to go for the extension and the General Election.

If that's the case he can't run on a No Deal platform he'll have to campaign on his deal which brings the Brexit Party into play! They haven't said it yet but there's no way they're going for it which rules out an election pact.

The numbers in the commons is key he's currently -45 votes ... there's a good chance he'll get a chunk of the 21 back but can he convince enough Labour MP's to go for it and can he talk the DUP round??

I'm waiting for someone with more knowledge of the detail to confirm it to me but does anyone know what exactly this means for the North??

One of them has since joined the Lib Dems.

seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8593 on: October 17, 2019, 12:11:32 PM »
It looks like No Deal was kicked into touch
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screenexile

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #8594 on: October 17, 2019, 12:13:27 PM »
Ulster Bank's chief economist . . .

Quote
Richard Ramsey
@Ramseconomics

A good deal for hard Brexiteers. A bad deal for advocates of a soft Brexit and Remainers. Significantly worse for the NI economy than May's deal. More bureaucracy, red tape & complexity.  Adding to the costs of doing business. NI to become a spectator on any UK trade deals?