Author Topic: Brexit.  (Read 370375 times)

Main Street

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5520 on: December 04, 2018, 09:58:52 PM »
Was heading home from work listening to the May address the commons, must be question time, I like her, ballsy bitch.. the others in the house sound like a bunch of public school fucktards, well the speaker called them that (not the fucktards bit) when trying to get order!
Isn't that public school fucktard behaviour the norm for the UK parliament? at least it sounds like that at any PM qustion time.

Franko

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5521 on: December 04, 2018, 10:05:48 PM »
Could well do, but I donít think there is a huge conspiracy, more of a opportunity to fill pockets from a disastrous situation

How does that humble pie taste?

Do you wash it down with that fiver-a-bottle piss you thought was wine?

Hereís the thing Franko, in my household it actually makes no difference, so Iíll wash it down with whatever bottle of wine I like, calling it disastrous is what it has become these past 2 years when people who get paid to negotiate a leave plan havenít a fecking clue..

I never voted it but hey you canít have your cake and eat it.. but If youíre sleeping on the street Franko Iíll get you a coffee  ;)

I can't hear you over the noise of your reversing bleeper.

Milltown Row2

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5522 on: December 04, 2018, 10:28:01 PM »
Could well do, but I donít think there is a huge conspiracy, more of a opportunity to fill pockets from a disastrous situation

How does that humble pie taste?

Do you wash it down with that fiver-a-bottle piss you thought was wine?

Hereís the thing Franko, in my household it actually makes no difference, so Iíll wash it down with whatever bottle of wine I like, calling it disastrous is what it has become these past 2 years when people who get paid to negotiate a leave plan havenít a fecking clue..

I never voted it but hey you canít have your cake and eat it.. but If youíre sleeping on the street Franko Iíll get you a coffee  ;)

I can't hear you over the noise of your reversing bleeper.

No reversing as I never voted for it, and it may not happen and I said that at the start, so until itís done and sealed and I view the carnage Iíll hold ultimate judgement  :o
Anything I post is not the view of the County Board!! Nobody died in the making of this post ;-)

Franko

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5523 on: December 04, 2018, 10:52:28 PM »
Could well do, but I donít think there is a huge conspiracy, more of a opportunity to fill pockets from a disastrous situation

How does that humble pie taste?

Do you wash it down with that fiver-a-bottle piss you thought was wine?

Hereís the thing Franko, in my household it actually makes no difference, so Iíll wash it down with whatever bottle of wine I like, calling it disastrous is what it has become these past 2 years when people who get paid to negotiate a leave plan havenít a fecking clue..

I never voted it but hey you canít have your cake and eat it.. but If youíre sleeping on the street Franko Iíll get you a coffee  ;)

I can't hear you over the noise of your reversing bleeper.

No reversing as I never voted for it, and it may not happen and I said that at the start, so until itís done and sealed and I view the carnage Iíll hold ultimate judgement  :o

Ah right.  So the whole "disastrous situation" thing was just an interim judgement then.

Lol... bleep bleep.

RadioGAAGAA

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5524 on: December 05, 2018, 10:06:28 AM »
I like her, ballsy bitch..

She's a power hungry witch who I wouldn't trust a nanometre, never mind an inch.

Was the same as home secretary. Her govt is trying every wee power grab they can. The process could be a lot smoother if she wasn't trying constantly trying to ride roughshod over democratic process (even putting aside my feelings on how useless representative democracy is, its better than the dictatorship she'd prefer).


As for the idea she is working to a secret and far-seeing plan of derailing Brexit - she could have accomplished the same with much less heartache if she'd stated 2 years ago "I will negotiate a deal, then put that deal to the people for their approval" - all of her actions reconcile with seeking more power rather than seeking to keep the UK in the EU through sleight of hand.
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OgraAnDun

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5525 on: December 05, 2018, 11:43:21 AM »
I like her, ballsy bitch..

She's a power hungry witch who I wouldn't trust a nanometre, never mind an inch.

Was the same as home secretary. Her govt is trying every wee power grab they can. The process could be a lot smoother if she wasn't trying constantly trying to ride roughshod over democratic process (even putting aside my feelings on how useless representative democracy is, its better than the dictatorship she'd prefer).


As for the idea she is working to a secret and far-seeing plan of derailing Brexit - she could have accomplished the same with much less heartache if she'd stated 2 years ago "I will negotiate a deal, then put that deal to the people for their approval" - all of her actions reconcile with seeking more power rather than seeking to keep the UK in the EU through sleight of hand.

I believe the rationale behind not announcing that at the start was that it would have given the hardliners the time to organise and plot against her.

johnnycool

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5526 on: December 05, 2018, 12:07:35 PM »
Did anyone see the quivering chin on the Attorney General Geoffrey Cox when the vote to release the legal advice was passed.

Shifty..........

RadioGAAGAA

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5527 on: December 05, 2018, 12:38:45 PM »
I believe the rationale behind not announcing that at the start was that it would have given the hardliners the time to organise and plot against her.

There isn't much the hardliners could have done - most of the house would have rounded on them for trying to force through a deal regardless of how good/bad it was for the country and regardless of whether the people actually liked the deal that was (at that point in time) negotiated.

I'm still of the opinion she's a power hungry witch. Too many power grabs over too many years to be so easily convinced otherwise.
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weareros

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5528 on: December 05, 2018, 01:16:12 PM »
Did anyone see the quivering chin on the Attorney General Geoffrey Cox when the vote to release the legal advice was passed.

Shifty..........

He is quite the cartoon character in a parliament of toons. Seems the end result of them releasing it is the SNP see it as providing even more favourable terms for NI, while the DUP see it as devastating for NI. Same as before then.

Rossfan

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5529 on: December 05, 2018, 03:19:41 PM »
If DUPUDA could only manage one brain between the lot of them....... :-\
2018- 2 Cupeens won, 2 to go.

Eamonnca1

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5530 on: December 06, 2018, 05:29:25 PM »
Been convinced for a while May is working to a greater plan. Brexit is economic Ground zero for Britain. It wonít happen but the chaos will make some very wealthy and many quite poor.

I've been wondering about this myself. She was a remainer. If she's smart she'll have adopted this "Brexit means Brexit" pose to make her leadership position as secure as it's going to get in such a divided party, negotiate the best deal she can get with Brussels (it was always going to be awful for the UK no matter who did the negotiating), fail to get it passed in parliament, and then put it to the people in a second referendum where Remain prevails and the whole sorry mess can be put behind us.

macdanger2

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5531 on: December 06, 2018, 10:59:20 PM »
then put it to the people in a second referendum where Remain prevails and the whole sorry mess can be put behind us.

A referendum result would need to be +60% in favour of remain to "put it behind us", I can't see that happening. A slim remain might remove the immediate problem but it doesn't go away

seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5532 on: December 07, 2018, 05:48:24 AM »
The DUP is playing Russian Roulette

https://democracy.kent.gov.uk/documents/s88112/Item%207%20-%20Brexit.pdf

ďPotential implications from a no-deal scenario which staff have been asked to consider are:
 Prolonged disruption to passenger and freight networks impacting the strategic road and rail networks and the surrounding local road network;
 Disruption to the importation and exportation of goods, foodstuffs and other consumables, and medicines and other medical supplies due to changes in trading rules and regulations and from traffic congestion;
 Disruption to vulnerable individuals and communities affected by major traffic congestion resulting in an inability to attend schools, hospitals, etc.;
 Disruption to staff travel leading to staff shortages in key services such as
social care and an inability to provide local services and individual
appointments;
 An increase in the numbers of migrants arriving in Kent, including
unaccompanied asylum-seeking children, as a consequence of the change in UK-EU relations.

Childrenís Young People and Education Directorate (CYPE): CYPE are providing a range of briefings for schools via their headteacher briefings and e-briefings, with fuller guidance to be provided to schools in January 2019. These briefings have specifically shared latest planning assumptions and identified a need for schools to review travel plans for staff and pupils; supply chain vulnerabilities (e.g. schools meals, etc); any plans for off-site travel in the three to six month planning assumption window; and the air quality impacts that may arise from the idling of HGV and other vehicles close to education settings in the event of traffic disruption. Further work is needed to explore the impacts on early yearís settings.


 Adult Social Care and Health Directorate (ASCH): ASCH are working closely with suppliers to identify risks to service provision in the event of the no-deal planning assumptions being realised. In addition, work is being done to map the location of social care workers against clients, with the aim of exploring whether staff can be reallocated to clients closer to their place of residence Ė thereby mitigating the risk of travel to those workers accessing particularly vulnerable residents. A Brexit scenario exercise is also scheduled for operational commissioning staff to further assist identification of and preparation for any risks to this area of service delivery.

Coroners Service: could face difficulties with the transport of the deceased to post mortem or body storage facilities, the attendance of staff to hospital sites for identification purposes and travel by pathologists to mortuary to conduct post mortems. Whilst mitigation measures are being explored, there are limited options available to this service. ď

What can you say? Itís like war
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Insane Bolt

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5533 on: December 07, 2018, 08:19:06 AM »
The DUP is playing Russian Roulette

https://democracy.kent.gov.uk/documents/s88112/Item%207%20-%20Brexit.pdf

ďPotential implications from a no-deal scenario which staff have been asked to consider are:
 Prolonged disruption to passenger and freight networks impacting the strategic road and rail networks and the surrounding local road network;
 Disruption to the importation and exportation of goods, foodstuffs and other consumables, and medicines and other medical supplies due to changes in trading rules and regulations and from traffic congestion;
 Disruption to vulnerable individuals and communities affected by major traffic congestion resulting in an inability to attend schools, hospitals, etc.;
 Disruption to staff travel leading to staff shortages in key services such as
social care and an inability to provide local services and individual
appointments;
 An increase in the numbers of migrants arriving in Kent, including
unaccompanied asylum-seeking children, as a consequence of the change in UK-EU relations.

Childrenís Young People and Education Directorate (CYPE): CYPE are providing a range of briefings for schools via their headteacher briefings and e-briefings, with fuller guidance to be provided to schools in January 2019. These briefings have specifically shared latest planning assumptions and identified a need for schools to review travel plans for staff and pupils; supply chain vulnerabilities (e.g. schools meals, etc); any plans for off-site travel in the three to six month planning assumption window; and the air quality impacts that may arise from the idling of HGV and other vehicles close to education settings in the event of traffic disruption. Further work is needed to explore the impacts on early yearís settings.


 Adult Social Care and Health Directorate (ASCH): ASCH are working closely with suppliers to identify risks to service provision in the event of the no-deal planning assumptions being realised. In addition, work is being done to map the location of social care workers against clients, with the aim of exploring whether staff can be reallocated to clients closer to their place of residence Ė thereby mitigating the risk of travel to those workers accessing particularly vulnerable residents. A Brexit scenario exercise is also scheduled for operational commissioning staff to further assist identification of and preparation for any risks to this area of service delivery.

Coroners Service: could face difficulties with the transport of the deceased to post mortem or body storage facilities, the attendance of staff to hospital sites for identification purposes and travel by pathologists to mortuary to conduct post mortems. Whilst mitigation measures are being explored, there are limited options available to this service. ď

What can you say? Itís like war

The DUP don't do reality......everything will be fine as long as 'our fleg is flying'.

seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #5534 on: December 07, 2018, 09:21:15 AM »
Philip Stephens' mother was from Kiltimagh


   https://www.ft.com/content/b91dd274-f895-11e8-8b7c-6fa24bd5409c

   Theresa May has lost control of Brexit
      
      
               This is what happens when parliamentary democracies shuffle off responsibility
      
         Philip Stephens

So this is what they meant by taking back control. Theresa Mayís government has drawn up plans to allocate space on European ferries arriving at the British port of Dover. Trucks carrying medicines will get permits to make the crossing from Calais; so too, perhaps, those with components for vital business supply chains. Britainís consumers have been warned. There will not be enough room for luxuries such as fresh fruit and vegetables.

Crashing out of the EU in March without a deal would see the restoration overnight of Britainís national sovereignty. This surely would be Brexit at its purest ó manna for those in Mrs Mayís party seeking a complete rupture with the continent. Decisions on the opening and closing of ports and borders would be a matter for the Westminster government alone. Britain, in the lurid language of the Brexiters, would have cast off the shackles. So runs the theory. Now the reality is beginning to impose itself. Calais-Dover by a large measure is Britainís most important trade route. It operates with the consent and co-operation of France. Whitehall officials estimate the inevitable post-Brexit imposition at Calais of EU checks and controls would cut traffic ó imports to, as well as exports from, Britain ó by more than four-fifths. The effect would be to choke off supplies to much of British business and leave stranded in France much of the produce destined for British supermarket shelves. So much for sovereignty.For the prime minister such horror stories ó and this is one of many ó are the only argument she has for the dismal deal she has negotiated with the EU27. It is not enough. The closer Brexit looms, the more obvious the prospective damage to the nationís prosperity and security. Mrs Mayís agreement would delay some of the consequences and throw a veil over others. Taken in the round, it is a charade ó a hapless attempt to wish away the yawning gulf between abstract concepts of sovereignty and real national power.Those tuning in to the parliamentary debate on the agreement could be forgiven for thinking the only big problem is a so-called backstop arrangement to guarantee an open border between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic.

 In truth, the backstop is simply a proxy for the wrangling about sovereignty. The vital substance of Britainís decades-long engagement with Europe has been lost to arcane debates about supposed sovereignty. The Britain sought by the Brexiters is one of impotent isolation ó a nation with an untrammelled right to harm itself.Brexit: all you need to know about the meaningful voteIn any event, MPs look set to throw out the prime ministerís package. The Conservative partyís Kamikaze Brexiters are clinging on to their Elizabethan fantasies of a ďglobal BritainĒ. Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour leader, is as reactionary as any in his views of Europe. Where English nationalists see an attempt by Brussels to suborn democracy, Mr Corbyn spies a vicious capitalist plot against the working classes.

Most Labour MPs scorn their leaderís conspiracy theories, but then shrug their shoulders and vote along party lines.The signs are there is a majority against a disorderly Brexit that would see Britain crash out of the Union. But to what purpose? Mrs Mayís tortuous compromises have probably killed off the idea of a muddle-through Brexit. There might be just enough votes for an arrangement with the EU roughly comparable to that of Norway. But where is the political leadership to marshal such a majority? Brexit has already done immeasurable damage to Britainís international standing. Things could now get worse. What are friends and allies to make of the present spectacle in parliament? There could surely be nothing more humiliating than the failure of its politicians to agree among themselves as to the terms of Britainís departure.This is what happens when parliamentary democracies seek to shrug off responsibility. Referendums undermine political pluralism. As Margaret Thatcher used to say, they are a favourite device of demagogues and dictators. The so-called will of the people reduces liberal democracy to majoritarianism. In this case, parliament is now being asked to approve a divorce with Europe that most MPs believe will make the nation poorer and weaker.Your Brexit questions answered by FT experts As irony would have it, the advocate general of the European Court of Justice may have thrown a lifeline. The British government, he has advised, would be permitted by the EU treaty to withdraw unilaterally its Article 50 request to leave the EU. The Courtís judges have still to offer a final opinion, but precedent suggests they are likely to agree. Therein lies the opportunity for the prime minister to take back control.Her last act in Downing Street ó it is hard to see how she could long remain in office in the wake of a Commons defeat ó could be to prepare to rescind Brexit. As a caretaker prime minister, Mrs May could ask the EU27 to stop the clock while the nation voted in the referendum it was denied in 2016 ó a clear and transparent choice between sovereign isolation and the sometimes uncomfortable empowerment that comes with membership of the EU. Mrs May had hoped her legacy would be that of the leader who took the country though Brexit while avoiding a violent rupture in the Conservative party. That cause is lost. History will anyway be a lot kinder if she gives the country the chance to think again
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