Author Topic: Brexit.  (Read 555474 times)

LeoMc

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #690 on: June 24, 2016, 09:50:40 PM »
Switzerland do alright. As does Norway, Israel, US, China etc.

You are deluded if you think the UK won't be able to trade with EU members. They're the 5th or 6th biggest economy in the world. They'll work it out!

Immigration is a factor too. Infrastructures can't cope with massive influxes of people; hospitals, doctors, schools etc. Another good reason to get out. Should've happened 10 years ago.

The UK has had billions wiped off it's stock market today that it will never see again.

It will lose all the funding that it got from the EU.

Beggars belief the sheer ignorance out there. When it hits the pocket they'll realise what a stupid decision it was
Ordinary people don't understand how finance works

Ordinary people don't trust politicans. Brexit is a result of successive governments lying to and screwing people over.
Now that I agree with.

Milltown Row2

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #691 on: June 24, 2016, 09:53:29 PM »
Ricky Gervais tweeted..... Joking aside, Brexit won't make any difference, the rich will still be rich and the poor will still be poor, and we'll still blame Johnny foreigner
Anything I post is not the view of the County Board!! Nobody died in the making of this post ;-)

LeoMc

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #692 on: June 24, 2016, 09:53:36 PM »
The lunatics have taken over the asylum.  I wonder how many of the average joes in England who voted for leave really understand the possible impact of this on their pockets.  Who will they blame about the state of the NHS and the lack of jobs in 5 years time?  Big bad EU can't carry the can anymore. Over here, it's going to be a much tougher job for InvestNI to attract investment here now.

Listen to yourselves, the people have voted democratically to exit the EU, quit whinging and finger pointing and accept the decision and move on.
Correct t, we have to make the best of it. No point fighting the last battle.

johnneycool

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #693 on: June 24, 2016, 10:01:25 PM »
You kinda hope that the Tories select Boris (is he an MP?) and he's sent to do the deal with the EU, you really can't see anything other than a mess, but who else looks like leadership material there?

As for Corbyn, he comes across as a decent human being but not the type of person to inspire people

Boycey

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #694 on: June 24, 2016, 10:22:34 PM »
You kinda hope that the Tories select Boris (is he an MP?) and he's sent to do the deal with the EU, you really can't see anything other than a mess, but who else looks like leadership material there?

As for Corbyn, he comes across as a decent human being but not the type of person to inspire people

He who wields the knife never wears the crown?

seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #695 on: June 24, 2016, 10:29:15 PM »

Nick Clegg

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/6044d4e8-3a03-11e6-a780-b48ed7b6126f.html

The people have spoken. Like any democrat, I respect the outcome of the referendum and believe the will of the voters must now be carried out.
But that does not mean I am not angry. I feel no anger towards the millions who voted for Brexit: they did so out of a mixture of conviction, frustration and disillusionment with the status quo which was sincere and heartfelt.
No, I am angry that my children’s future has been put at risk by a needless referendum. Angry at the brazen mendacity of a Leave campaign which has no idea what happens next. Angry at the careless elitism of Michael Gove, Boris Johnson, Steve Hilton and other leading Brexiters, parading themselves as tribunes of the people from their gilded worlds in Westminster, North London and California.
Angry at the years of wilful misrepresentation of the EU by vested interests in the press. Angry at the betrayal that Brexit voters will feel when they realise — too late — that a land of milk and honey outside the EU does not exist.
Angry that the political stability, legal reliability and economic openness which have marked out Britain as a global leader have been casually cast aside. Angry that three-quarters of young people voted for a future — to remain in the EU — denied to them by their seniors.
But my greatest anger is reserved for David Cameron and George Osborne — notwithstanding the dignity of the prime minister’s resignation . They and they alone are responsible for bringing our great country to this sorry pass.
This need never have happened. When we were in coalition with the Conservatives I was repeatedly asked by them to agree to a referendum on their terms.
I refused point blank because elevating internal party rows to a national plebiscite is not good enough — especially since we had already enshrined into law in 2011 a referendum trigger to ratify future EU Treaties.
I remember asking the prime minister whether he was sure he could win a referendum designed to settle an internal Tory feud. I was breezily told that all would be well, of course it would be won.
When the Conservatives unexpectedly won the general election last year their complacency only increased: they started to believe they could defy political gravity, on the winning side of the 2011 referendum on voting reform, the Scottish referendum in 2014 and now gifted with a majority of their own.
They forgot that less than a quarter of eligible voters voted Conservative. Last year’s election victory was no mandate for the Tories — it was a vote against all the other likely alternatives.
But they pressed on regardless — clogging up parliament with petty, partisan measures to clip the wings of trade unions, remove public funds from opposition parties, slash tax credits, grant tax bungs to their wealthy supporters and fiddle with constituency boundaries to cement their electoral advantage.
When we were in coalition with the Conservatives I was repeatedly asked by them to agree to a referendum on their terms. I refused point blank
After Mr Osborne’s first budget unravelled I expected that they would tread more carefully. But still they pressed on — and the chancellor’s second budget was also eviscerated in the face of parliamentary opposition.
But their greatest failing was this: having spent two decades striking poses as Eurosceptics to curry favour with their party they believed that they could change their tune in the last second of the eleventh hour in the referendum.
Voters are not stupid. I met many people in my own constituency in Sheffield who refused to follow Messrs Cameron or Osborne because they had been told the exact opposite by them for years.
Like all pro-Europeans, I sought to help the No 10-led referendum campaign — providing private advice and public support. But as the campaign wore on, it became clear that the prime minister and his chancellor were prisoners of their past: having spent so many years denigrating the EU, it was impossible for them to make a positive case.
They were condemned to make a negative case — the EU is not great, but leaving would be worse — which lacked any emotional impact, culminating in the dismal “punishment budget” proposed by Mr Osborne last week.
I feel for Mr Cameron and his family today — as I know well, abrupt defeat is not easy. My head is less forgiving. His and Mr Osborne’s fair-weather approach to Britain’s vital national interests in Europe has let future generations down.
The message for internationalist, pro-European politicians in all parties is clear: we must never again allow our national interest to be hijacked by internal party feuds; we must take on the populists who only know how to destroy the links that bind nations together; we must work across parties to safeguard the Britain we believe in — a great people engaged with, not divorced from, our own European continent.
The writer, former leader of the Liberal Democrats, was deputy prime minister in the 2010-15 coalition government
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seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #696 on: June 24, 2016, 10:32:19 PM »
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/63769fb6-3a03-11e6-a780-b48ed7b6126f.html

The US will also pay a price for Brexit. One of its closest partners in the world will have less to offer. And the UK will no longer be able to influence the course of EU foreign policy, something that on balance will work against American purposes in the world.
The special relationship will be decidedly less special as Washington will have no choice but to find other partners in Europe, the Middle East and Asia.
It is impossible to write about Brexit without reflecting on its larger meaning and message.
Many of those voting for Brexit were not voting to set in motion historic trends so much as to send a message of frustration, fear and anger. They succeeded, but at a great cost. It is a lesson for democracies and for institutions, that when they are perceived to be unresponsive or ineffective, people will turn to radical “solutions” that are anything but.
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BennyCake

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #697 on: June 24, 2016, 10:32:32 PM »
What worries me is the people in NI who voted Leave. Many of the English voters were duped (imho) whereas voters here... What exactly do they, as someone from Northern Ireland, stand to benefit from? The only argument I've heard from pro-brexit unionists is that it's a "uk-wide issue"; that theyve just done what their idiot politicans have told them to do

I voted Leave. Either way, the ordinary Joe will be shafted. Europe is run by unelected w**kers and member states have to toe the line. EU quotas have destroyed fishing in Ireland (and UK), a country that relies heavily on it. I never thought Leave would win, but now that it has, hopefully the rest will leave, and that can only be a good thing.

Yes, post-Brexit there will be recession, cuts etc - but they've never needed an excuse for that in the past. They'll blame Brexit and make people suffer but they would have done that anyway.
Without quotas there would be no fish.

Without massive trawlers there'd be plenty of fish.

Minder

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #698 on: June 24, 2016, 10:34:26 PM »
Are you allowed to express concerns about unchecked immigration without being labelled a racist ?
"When it's too tough for them, it's just right for us"

seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #699 on: June 24, 2016, 10:35:20 PM »
Mrs Cameron's dress was sewn out of 3 Spanish football jerseys
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LeoMc

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #700 on: June 24, 2016, 10:38:24 PM »
What worries me is the people in NI who voted Leave. Many of the English voters were duped (imho) whereas voters here... What exactly do they, as someone from Northern Ireland, stand to benefit from? The only argument I've heard from pro-brexit unionists is that it's a "uk-wide issue"; that theyve just done what their idiot politicans have told them to do

I voted Leave. Either way, the ordinary Joe will be shafted. Europe is run by unelected w**kers and member states have to toe the line. EU quotas have destroyed fishing in Ireland (and UK), a country that relies heavily on it. I never thought Leave would win, but now that it has, hopefully the rest will leave, and that can only be a good thing.

Yes, post-Brexit there will be recession, cuts etc - but they've never needed an excuse for that in the past. They'll blame Brexit and make people suffer but they would have done that anyway.
Without quotas there would be no fish.

Without massive trawlers there'd be plenty of fish.
And massive trawlers are the fault of the EU?

LeoMc

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #701 on: June 24, 2016, 10:39:29 PM »
Are you allowed to express concerns about unchecked immigration without being labelled a racist ?
EU or non EU immigration?

BennyCake

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #702 on: June 24, 2016, 10:51:26 PM »
What worries me is the people in NI who voted Leave. Many of the English voters were duped (imho) whereas voters here... What exactly do they, as someone from Northern Ireland, stand to benefit from? The only argument I've heard from pro-brexit unionists is that it's a "uk-wide issue"; that theyve just done what their idiot politicans have told them to do

I voted Leave. Either way, the ordinary Joe will be shafted. Europe is run by unelected w**kers and member states have to toe the line. EU quotas have destroyed fishing in Ireland (and UK), a country that relies heavily on it. I never thought Leave would win, but now that it has, hopefully the rest will leave, and that can only be a good thing.

Yes, post-Brexit there will be recession, cuts etc - but they've never needed an excuse for that in the past. They'll blame Brexit and make people suffer but they would have done that anyway.
Without quotas there would be no fish.

Without massive trawlers there'd be plenty of fish.
And massive trawlers are the fault of the EU?

Massive trawlers taking massive quotas are.

Local fisherman restricted to measly quotas, while massive foreign trawlers can take what they want in local waters.

armaghniac

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #703 on: June 24, 2016, 10:56:05 PM »
What worries me is the people in NI who voted Leave. Many of the English voters were duped (imho) whereas voters here... What exactly do they, as someone from Northern Ireland, stand to benefit from? The only argument I've heard from pro-brexit unionists is that it's a "uk-wide issue"; that theyve just done what their idiot politicans have told them to do

I voted Leave. Either way, the ordinary Joe will be shafted. Europe is run by unelected w**kers and member states have to toe the line. EU quotas have destroyed fishing in Ireland (and UK), a country that relies heavily on it. I never thought Leave would win, but now that it has, hopefully the rest will leave, and that can only be a good thing.

Yes, post-Brexit there will be recession, cuts etc - but they've never needed an excuse for that in the past. They'll blame Brexit and make people suffer but they would have done that anyway.
Without quotas there would be no fish.

Without massive trawlers there'd be plenty of fish.
And massive trawlers are the fault of the EU?

Massive trawlers taking massive quotas are.

Local fisherman restricted to measly quotas, while massive foreign trawlers can take what they want in local waters.

But of course this isn't happening in Britain, massive British registered trawlers are taking the bulk of the fish. These may be owned by a limited company, maybe with foreign shareholders, but Boris is not going to restrict this.
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Armamike

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #704 on: June 24, 2016, 10:58:33 PM »
The lunatics have taken over the asylum.  I wonder how many of the average joes in England who voted for leave really understand the possible impact of this on their pockets.  Who will they blame about the state of the NHS and the lack of jobs in 5 years time?  Big bad EU can't carry the can anymore. Over here, it's going to be a much tougher job for InvestNI to attract investment here now.

Listen to yourselves, the people have voted democratically to exit the EU, quit whinging and finger pointing and accept the decision and move on.

Do you still live and work here Stew?
I'll have a shower and then phone my brother up