Author Topic: Brexit.  (Read 555585 times)

Oghams Law

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #330 on: June 23, 2016, 10:22:26 AM »
Muppet,
Im irish, but I can vote on this
As regards immigration 150,000 eu citizens settled in uk last year alone so wouldnt say leaving the eu would have no impact  ;D
As regards corp tax Britain wont vote in Irelands interest, but I will
I have met politicians and no idea what your on about with mayo

Jeepers Creepers

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #331 on: June 23, 2016, 10:26:49 AM »
I'm in.

muppet

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #332 on: June 23, 2016, 10:29:23 AM »
Muppet,
Im irish, but I can vote on this
As regards immigration 150,000 eu citizens settled in uk last year alone so wouldnt say leaving the eu would have no impact  ;D
As regards corp tax Britain wont vote in Irelands interest, but I will
I have met politicians and no idea what your on about with mayo




If you are voting for Brexit 'in Ireland's interests', then I can understand. Watching Britain destroy itself might be fun, but I would expect some very nasty side-effects down the road.

Mayo could leave the EU and would '...be free to trade outside eu with the largest economies of the world on its own terms'. Like I said I see no advantage to being a smaller weaker party at the negotiations but I see lots of downside. Only 7% of EU exports go to Britain whereas something like 40% of British exports go to the EU. Ireland will feature highly in both of those numbers, but the EU will have all of the leverage.
MWWSI 2017

seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #333 on: June 23, 2016, 10:30:17 AM »
Immigration is a key plank of neoliberalism. The ideology generates SFA economic growth because it takes money from ordinary people to give to the rich.   Immigration does generate growth though since the more people in a country the more money they spend. If the population grows by 2% then economic activity increases.

Changing the economic system is urgent. Without neoliberalism immigration would fall and workers would get pay rises .
Lookit

muppet

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #334 on: June 23, 2016, 10:38:10 AM »
Immigration is a key plank of neoliberalism. The ideology generates SFA economic growth because it takes money from ordinary people to give to the rich.   Immigration does generate growth though since the more people in a country the more money they spend. If the population grows by 2% then economic activity increases.

Changing the economic system is urgent. Without neoliberalism immigration would fall and workers would get pay rises .

There was immigration before neoliberalism and there will be immigration long after whatever the hell you think neoliberalism is and during whatever buzz-word du jour era comes next.

It is the most basic form of economics.

Assuming a certain level of competence do you hire:

a) the local guy who charges more;
or
b) the foreigner who charges less;

Although you, in particular, think everyone hires from b), if you ask people they will all say a). The answer is usually a little from column a) and a little from column b). It has always been thus, with the possible exception of countries who were extremely poor in the past, and will always be thus.

Britain can't close its borders to it Empirical past. The EU and neoliberalism has nothing to do with that.
MWWSI 2017

NAG1

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #335 on: June 23, 2016, 10:39:32 AM »
Muppet,
Im irish, but I can vote on this
As regards immigration 150,000 eu citizens settled in uk last year alone so wouldnt say leaving the eu would have no impact  ;D
As regards corp tax Britain wont vote in Irelands interest, but I will
I have met politicians and no idea what your on about with mayo

Any Irish person using immigration as an excuse, needs to take a serious look at themselves.

yellowcard

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #336 on: June 23, 2016, 10:46:42 AM »
Leave

My reasons:

The uk should be free to develop its own immigration policy following a needs based model


Am I right in saying your Irish, living in the UK and want to control immigration?!

Oghams Law

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #337 on: June 23, 2016, 11:05:21 AM »
Leave

My reasons:

The uk should be free to develop its own immigration policy following a needs based model


Am I right in saying your Irish, living in the UK and want to control immigration?!

Yeah theres quite a few of us in Tyrone

Lazer

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #338 on: June 23, 2016, 11:10:56 AM »
Leave

The EU is unrecognizable from the EEC that the UK voted for in 1975

What with the EU be like in 2025 - will it even be recognizable as the same one we are voting for today?

I fully support the EEC, and the original concepts of free trade and free movement of labour between countries that are economically, politically and culturally similar, however the EU has become a political body as well as a trading body, and the 28 member states are no longer similar enough for the concept to be a success.

The EU (and especially the Euro) are failing in my opinion

Don't like the unfair competition laws - ie: A country can't prop up failing businesses and protect employment as this would be considered state aid and yet the EU can encourage investment in disadvantaged areas and give them aid in the form of grants.

The reduction in the block grant if we lower corporation tax, is mandated by the EU (OK Westminster may (and probably would have) have choosen to reduce it anyway, but at least there would be a possibility it may not be reduced or at least negotiated a better deal)

The EU is enforcing laws and austerity measures on Ireland, water charges are/were mandatory as part of the measures enforced by the EU as a condition of the bailout, which they forced Ireland to accept.

I don't like the EU overruling the laws of a member nation and being able to force them to comply.

Its bad enough being ruled by the UK, its worse being ruled by an even further detached foreign parliament.



Down for Sam 2017 (Have already written of 2016!)

Oghams Law

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #339 on: June 23, 2016, 11:12:09 AM »
Muppet,
Im irish, but I can vote on this
As regards immigration 150,000 eu citizens settled in uk last year alone so wouldnt say leaving the eu would have no impact  ;D
As regards corp tax Britain wont vote in Irelands interest, but I will
I have met politicians and no idea what your on about with mayo

Any Irish person using immigration as an excuse, needs to take a serious look at themselves.

How so? Controlling Immigration I said not stopping it. There are many Irish people in Australia atm (my family members amoung them). Australia controls immigration based on their needs. Common sense I would of thought. Do you see the difference?

muppet

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #340 on: June 23, 2016, 11:13:06 AM »
Leave

The EU is unrecognizable from the EEC that the UK voted for in 1975

What with the EU be like in 2025 - will it even be recognizable as the same one we are voting for today?

I fully support the EEC, and the original concepts of free trade and free movement of labour between countries that are economically, politically and culturally similar, however the EU has become a political body as well as a trading body, and the 28 member states are no longer similar enough for the concept to be a success.

The EU (and especially the Euro) are failing in my opinion

Don't like the unfair competition laws - ie: A country can't prop up failing businesses and protect employment as this would be considered state aid and yet the EU can encourage investment in disadvantaged areas and give them aid in the form of grants.

The reduction in the block grant if we lower corporation tax, is mandated by the EU (OK Westminster may have choosen to reduce it anyway, but at least there would be a possibility it may not be reduced)

The EU is enforcing laws and austerity measures on Ireland, water charges are/were mandatory as part of the measures enforced by the EU as a condition of the bailout, which they forced Ireland to accept.

I don't like the EU overruling the laws of a member nation and being able to force them to comply.

Its bad enough being ruled by the UK, its worse being ruled by an even further detached foreign parliament.

Are you confusing the Eurozone and the EU?
MWWSI 2017

Keyboard Warrior

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #341 on: June 23, 2016, 11:16:24 AM »
The EU is unrecognizable from the EEC that the UK voted for in 1975

What with the EU be like in 2025 - will it even be recognizable as the same one we are voting for today?

I fully support the EEC, and the original concepts of free trade and free movement of labour between countries that are economically, politically and culturally similar, however the EU has become a political body as well as a trading body, and the 28 member states are no longer similar enough for the concept to be a success.

The EU (and especially the Euro) are failing in my opinion

Don't like the unfair competition laws - ie: A country can't prop up failing businesses and protect employment as this would be considered state aid and yet the EU can encourage investment in disadvantaged areas and give them aid in the form of grants.

The reduction in the block grant if we lower corporation tax, is mandated by the EU (OK Westminster may (and probably would have) have choosen to reduce it anyway, but at least there would be a possibility it may not be reduced or at least negotiated a better deal)

The EU is enforcing laws and austerity measures on Ireland, water charges are/were mandatory as part of the measures enforced by the EU as a condition of the bailout, which they forced Ireland to accept.

I don't like the EU overruling the laws of a member nation and being able to force them to comply.

Its bad enough being ruled by the UK, its worse being ruled by an even further detached foreign parliament.

+1

NAG1

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #342 on: June 23, 2016, 11:19:16 AM »
Muppet,
Im irish, but I can vote on this
As regards immigration 150,000 eu citizens settled in uk last year alone so wouldnt say leaving the eu would have no impact  ;D
As regards corp tax Britain wont vote in Irelands interest, but I will
I have met politicians and no idea what your on about with mayo

Any Irish person using immigration as an excuse, needs to take a serious look at themselves.

How so? Controlling Immigration I said not stopping it. There are many Irish people in Australia atm (my family members amoung them). Australia controls immigration based on their needs. Common sense I would of thought. Do you see the difference?

So those that fled to America or anywhere for economic/ famine etc, what about those?
So when other countries/ peoples are experiencing the same kind of human disasters, we say no its ok we are sorted now and we comfortable you sort your own mess out?

Short term memory

Rossfan

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #343 on: June 23, 2016, 11:25:58 AM »
Wait till the Spanish send all them Brits back home as illegals.
And no matter what the Brits do they have to take in people seeking asylum or will they leave the UN too " because it's more foreigners telling them what to do"
If the Brits leave the EU what happens with the 800,000 Irish( EU)  citizens in the 6 Cos?
1 BIG CUP and 1 Cupeen so far....

Lazer

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #344 on: June 23, 2016, 11:46:30 AM »
Leave

The EU is unrecognizable from the EEC that the UK voted for in 1975

What with the EU be like in 2025 - will it even be recognizable as the same one we are voting for today?

I fully support the EEC, and the original concepts of free trade and free movement of labour between countries that are economically, politically and culturally similar, however the EU has become a political body as well as a trading body, and the 28 member states are no longer similar enough for the concept to be a success.

The EU (and especially the Euro) are failing in my opinion

Don't like the unfair competition laws - ie: A country can't prop up failing businesses and protect employment as this would be considered state aid and yet the EU can encourage investment in disadvantaged areas and give them aid in the form of grants.

The reduction in the block grant if we lower corporation tax, is mandated by the EU (OK Westminster may have choosen to reduce it anyway, but at least there would be a possibility it may not be reduced)

The EU is enforcing laws and austerity measures on Ireland, water charges are/were mandatory as part of the measures enforced by the EU as a condition of the bailout, which they forced Ireland to accept.

I don't like the EU overruling the laws of a member nation and being able to force them to comply.

Its bad enough being ruled by the UK, its worse being ruled by an even further detached foreign parliament.

Are you confusing the Eurozone and the EU?

The EU is not the Eurozone but The Eurozone is part of the EU (and the majority part at that)

I am voting to what I think is in the best interests of Ireland (North and South).

A UK vote could be the beginning of the end for the EU, there are indications of France and the Netherlands wanting out too.
Down for Sam 2017 (Have already written of 2016!)