Author Topic: Brexit.  (Read 738647 times)

sid waddell

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3314
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9270 on: September 17, 2020, 08:13:15 PM »
The swivel eyed Brexit loons don't care one jot about Northern Ireland but they do care immensely about it being part of the UK

As is the case with Scotland and Wales


More like, the swivel eyed Brexit loons don't care one jot about Northern Ireland but they do care about it being part of the UK because it is an example to Scotland and Wales
I think they care hugely about Scotland and NI is only seen in relation to that issue, as much for itself.

There's a deep seated colonial unionism built into Brexitism - the Brexiteers see the DUP a bit like Putin sees Lukashenko in Belarus or how the French used to see the French settlers in Algeria - they simultaneously completely look down on them but also see them as very important to maintaining the fever dream of the imperial Brexiteer sphere of influence

That colonial unionism may not be massively apparent currently - though it's already showing itself through Johnson's public poo-pooing of another independence referendum in Scotland - but it will become apparent after no deal happens - the Celtic colonies will be the only thing the Little Englander Brexiteers have to hold on to

I think Brexit is English nationalism. Because Scotland and NI rejected it. They don't buy the Daily Mail view of the world.
It's English nationalism but it's also ethno-nationalism and ethno-colonialism

The fantasy of "Global Britain" extends to Australia, New Zealand and Canada, they are imagined as more or less "equals" because they're white majority - but it does not extend to former African colonies, yet Britain, sorry, England, believes the entirely one-way colonial relationship with non-white majority former British colonies can be revived, that they can be persuaded to once again be Britain's punching bags

The ethno-colonialism starts with Scotland, Wales and NI, the domestic punching bags

seafoid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24920
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9271 on: September 18, 2020, 02:52:50 PM »
Lookit

imtommygunn

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11079
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9272 on: September 23, 2020, 04:03:39 PM »
What's this border at Kent nonsense about?

Lorries going into Kent require a permit? That isn't going to go down well l

seafoid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 24920
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9273 on: September 23, 2020, 04:17:47 PM »
https://www.ft.com/content/aa42ac31-0aca-4c58-b6a8-b98618fba2d4

UK warns of 7,000-truck queues to cross Channel after January 1
 Cabinet minister Michael Gove says there could be 2-day delays in Kent for freight to clear customs after end of Brexit transition
Lookit

maddog

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2001
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9274 on: September 23, 2020, 04:20:26 PM »
https://www.ft.com/content/aa42ac31-0aca-4c58-b6a8-b98618fba2d4

UK warns of 7,000-truck queues to cross Channel after January 1
 Cabinet minister Michael Gove says there could be 2-day delays in Kent for freight to clear customs after end of Brexit transition

If you take average overall truck length to be roughly 55 feet and measure out 7000 bumper to bumper, that queue is all the way from m25 to Dover  ;D

sid waddell

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3314
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9275 on: September 25, 2020, 09:48:04 PM »
The UK is already completely fucked, yet things are about to get a lot, lot worse

And Murdoch is also launching a separate Fox News type channel

Money can buy the minds of populations

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2020/sep/25/andrew-neil-launches-24-hour-new-channel-to-rival-bbc-and-sky?CMP=twt_gu&utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium#Echobox=1601056423

Andrew Neil launches 24-hour news channel to rival BBC and Sky
GB News aimed at those who feel Ďunderserved and unheardí says veteran broadcaster


bennydorano

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5692
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9276 on: September 26, 2020, 06:56:35 PM »
See there's talk of increasing optimism in regards to a deal.

Among the Schadenfreude no doubt the ROI realises how dependent they are on the UK freight routes. While every utterance from the UK Government seems more chaotic than the last, there's no doubt in my mind they are calculated reminders (& negotiating tactics) for the ROI Government of the shitstorm that will face them as well come 1st January.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2020, 09:10:01 PM by bennydorano »

armaghniac

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14249
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9277 on: September 26, 2020, 08:50:28 PM »
Yes, but the EU can avoid a lot of the problems with the land bridge by hiring a few ferries. The ferry business has capacity for trucks as there are few holiday travellers. London's generation of chaos at Calais will affect them also with less obvious options for fixing it.
There is a touch of the sheriff in Blazing Saddles about the whole thing.
If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

bennydorano

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5692
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9278 on: September 26, 2020, 09:33:55 PM »
That actually really sounds like an answer a deluded Brexiteer would give when faced with a comparable situation, without any thought given to the actual praciticalities of genuinely having to get muliplte industries organised (physically & bureaucratically), against the clock, during a pandemic.

Has the ROI significantly enhanced any port routes for exporting goods directly to mainland Europe? when the UK is your biggest market it's also another related headache.

armaghniac

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14249
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9279 on: September 26, 2020, 11:04:49 PM »
That actually really sounds like an answer a deluded Brexiteer would give when faced with a comparable situation, without any thought given to the actual praciticalities of genuinely having to get muliplte industries organised (physically & bureaucratically), against the clock, during a pandemic.

Has the ROI significantly enhanced any port routes for exporting goods directly to mainland Europe? when the UK is your biggest market it's also another related headache.

Bennydorano, are you really a Brexiteer in Lincolnshire after all? If not are you impervious to actual news in the last 4 years? Britain is not the biggest market for the ROI, it took under 7% of exports in recent months. it is important for some sectors and it does provide many imports, but to hear people like you talking you would think it was the 1950s. NI takes almost 2%, but you don't need a boat to go there. I am not saying that everything is in place on the shipping front, but there have been new routes from Ireland to Spain, France and Belgium using some very large ships, like the Celine. And of course the land bridge will be disrupted to the extent there are problems in Britain, but it still exists.

There is a problem, but not a crisis for most industries and there will be mitigations for those.
If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

Rossfan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16915
  • Ballaghaderreen CO ROSCOMMON
    • View Profile
    • Roscommon County Board official website
Still Connacht Champions

bennydorano

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5692
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9281 on: September 27, 2020, 01:18:12 PM »
Sunday Tines today has the positive version - both sides giving concessions. "Number 10 officials cautioned against the idea that a deal is done, but it is understood that members of Frost's team have privately said- there will be a deal". Also noteworthy that they said Gove is terrified of the double whammy of Covid 2nd spike & no deal, that's significant.

armaghniac

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14249
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9282 on: September 27, 2020, 02:36:50 PM »
Sunday Tines today has the positive version - both sides giving concessions. "Number 10 officials cautioned against the idea that a deal is done, but it is understood that members of Frost's team have privately said- there will be a deal". Also noteworthy that they said Gove is terrified of the double whammy of Covid 2nd spike & no deal, that's significant.

If there is chaos, the EU will be blamed, but they'll also say that Gove did not do his job, that it is isn't a problem with the idea of Brexit but the person in charge of implementing it. And of course refusing to extend the date in the middle of Covid is madness.
If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

Fionntamhnach

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3026
  • "Hey Lawrence..."
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9283 on: September 27, 2020, 04:06:25 PM »
If there is chaos, the EU will be blamed, but they'll also say that Gove did not do his job, that it is isn't a problem with the idea of Brexit but the person in charge of implementing it. And of course refusing to extend the date in the middle of Covid is madness.

Too much money being gambled on international financial markets to really go any other direction unless a very "weak" deal is achieved. The general media in mainland Europe (and to a lesser extent in Ireland) have mentioned this plenty of times during the whole Brexit saga by pointing out whom is driving this behind the scenes along with other potential geopolitical influences from around the globe looking to damage EU solidarity. The British media, even the nominally left-of-centre outlets like the Mirror & Granuiad, have barely raised a whimper on the matter.
"I can't be arsed any more; too much ignorance, bigotry, dogma, idiocy & retreat from reason"

LCohen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1390
    • View Profile
Re: Brexit.
« Reply #9284 on: September 27, 2020, 08:42:53 PM »
That actually really sounds like an answer a deluded Brexiteer would give when faced with a comparable situation, without any thought given to the actual praciticalities of genuinely having to get muliplte industries organised (physically & bureaucratically), against the clock, during a pandemic.

Has the ROI significantly enhanced any port routes for exporting goods directly to mainland Europe? when the UK is your biggest market it's also another related headache.

Bennydorano, are you really a Brexiteer in Lincolnshire after all? If not are you impervious to actual news in the last 4 years? Britain is not the biggest market for the ROI, it took under 7% of exports in recent months. it is important for some sectors and it does provide many imports, but to hear people like you talking you would think it was the 1950s. NI takes almost 2%, but you don't need a boat to go there. I am not saying that everything is in place on the shipping front, but there have been new routes from Ireland to Spain, France and Belgium using some very large ships, like the Celine. And of course the land bridge will be disrupted to the extent there are problems in Britain, but it still exists.

There is a problem, but not a crisis for most industries and there will be mitigations for those.

You are over simplifying the issue.

Exports to UK are an issue. Itís not just the volume/value of the exports but how many jobs are related to those exports and what alternative jobs exist for those people and resources. What is the alternative for say Irish beef? Does it go the way of the smaller Irish mushroom sector?

Secondly there is the critical landbridge issue. Adequate progress on alternative sea crossing capacity isnít greatly in evidence and much more importantly creating a route to make it physically possible to export the goods via an alternative route is only half the problem. The reason the landbridge is used is because it is cheaper and more efficient than alternatives. Exports markets have been won based on that competitiveness. You donít lose that with zero impact