Author Topic: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.  (Read 171518 times)

seafoid

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2670 on: August 18, 2019, 10:39:12 AM »
https://www.rte.ie/news/2019/0816/1069255-new-settlement-on-the-island/

Quoting 2014 figures, the economists say the North contributed £1bn to UK Defence spending and £1bn towards the British national debt.

They add: "Furthermore, there will undoubtedly be some loss of public sector jobs in administering functions that would no longer exist in a post-unification scenario eg: HM Revenue and Customs which will reduce subvention costs further, although the net effect will be dependent on the success of former public sector workers finding re-employment."

There are also significant disparities in social welfare systems.


For example, an unemployed individual aged over 26 is entitled to a maximum of Ä193 per week in the Republic.

The equivalent payment in the North is £73.10 (Ä79.78).

Sťamus McGuinness and Adele Bergin also found that incomes in the North were far behind wealthier regions in both Great Britain and Ireland.

That is partly explained by low productivity levels.

In an analysis of educational standards across the regions of Britain and Ireland in 2015, Northern Ireland had the highest population of share of individuals without qualifications and was the poorest performer in terms of graduates

Pension payments are also higher in the South.

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seafoid

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markl121

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2672 on: August 18, 2019, 02:07:00 PM »
The free at point of service is a rallying call for Corbyn. IT will run the NHS into the ground

One free appointment per year for checkup and a charge if you need additional. U13 and O60 obviously should be given more/completely free. Would be a good starting point

As for antibiotics dont get me started, if you take a sick wean to the doctor they'll tell you its a virus and then proceed to superscribe antibiotics!!! 7 years trainng for that... WTF
Bullshit and disingenuous, GP's train for 4 years after graduation and none of us would put up with the crap they have to go through to get there. I have never met a GP yet who would dish out unwarranted Ab's. There is a shortage of GP's for very obvious reasons.

You have a 5 year degree +2 years training to become a doctor that was the 7 I was talking about. Not sure what it is after that to become a GP.. presumably another 2?

Im sure you have never meet a GP who would admit to prescribing "unwarranted Abs" especially in their professional circles but i can guarantee you they are prescribed for viruses. Usually introduced with "well normally I don't like to prescribe antibiotics, but....." I am quite sure if they were pushed on it they would say have an answer like "The patient was showing signs of possible infection and required an immediate course of ABs....."

Having worked as a pharmacist in both the north and the south, the southern gps are mad for prescribing antibiotics, especially in odd or substandard doses that appear to be given just to get the patient out of their hair. Any weekends I work where Iím dealing with out of hours doctors, every single script that comes in is an antibiotic. Feels like when people are paying the 40-50 Euro to see the out of hours, the doctor feels obliged to give an antiobiotic instead of telling the patient to go home and rest.

Denn Forever

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2673 on: August 18, 2019, 03:28:11 PM »
I wish it was 40-50 euro.  Here(Cavan) it is 90 euro for doctor on call.
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markl121

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2674 on: August 18, 2019, 03:36:49 PM »
I wish it was 40-50 euro.  Here(Cavan) it is 90 euro for doctor on call.
Thatís mental. Had a woman telling me the doctor on  charged 50 if paying by card or 20 if paying cash. Cowboys

armaghniac

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2675 on: August 18, 2019, 04:07:44 PM »
I wish it was 40-50 euro.  Here(Cavan) it is 90 euro for doctor on call.
Thatís mental. Had a woman telling me the doctor on  charged 50 if paying by card or 20 if paying cash. Cowboys

A doctor on call is going to take as long getting there as actually seeing the patient. You wouldn't be seeing 3 or 4 in an hour.
If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

markl121

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2676 on: August 18, 2019, 05:27:30 PM »
I wish it was 40-50 euro.  Here(Cavan) it is 90 euro for doctor on call.
Thatís mental. Had a woman telling me the doctor on  charged 50 if paying by card or 20 if paying cash. Cowboys

A doctor on call is going to take as long getting there as actually seeing the patient. You wouldn't be seeing 3 or 4 in an hour.

Iím more getting to the point heís charging 20 cash which is obviously going into the back pocket

armaghniac

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2677 on: August 18, 2019, 05:48:29 PM »
I wish it was 40-50 euro.  Here(Cavan) it is 90 euro for doctor on call.
Thatís mental. Had a woman telling me the doctor on  charged 50 if paying by card or 20 if paying cash. Cowboys

A doctor on call is going to take as long getting there as actually seeing the patient. You wouldn't be seeing 3 or 4 in an hour.

Iím more getting to the point heís charging 20 cash which is obviously going into the back pocket

A whole 20! Who wouldn't want to be a doctor.
If at first you don't succeed, then goto Plan B

Rossfan

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2678 on: August 18, 2019, 06:40:29 PM »
So a United Ireland is to be decided by anti biotics and prescriptions :o
« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 08:48:21 PM by Rossfan »
1 BIG CUP and 1 Cupeen so far....

markl121

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2679 on: August 18, 2019, 06:45:08 PM »
I wish it was 40-50 euro.  Here(Cavan) it is 90 euro for doctor on call.
Thatís mental. Had a woman telling me the doctor on  charged 50 if paying by card or 20 if paying cash. Cowboys

A doctor on call is going to take as long getting there as actually seeing the patient. You wouldn't be seeing 3 or 4 in an hour.

Iím more getting to the point heís charging 20 cash which is obviously going into the back pocket

A whole 20! Who wouldn't want to be a doctor.

Heís getting paid well by the Hse to provide the out of hours service also. The rest isnít documented. But sure tear you on

t_mac

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2680 on: August 19, 2019, 07:45:32 AM »
So a United Ireland is to be decided by anti biotics and prescriptions :o

Do you not think health care for all citizens is important.

t_mac

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2681 on: August 19, 2019, 07:50:00 AM »
In my surgery they have left a prescription at reception for antibiotics without seeing me, they have also done this for other members of my family, this is from a triage of a minute over the phone.
Presumably not before ascertaining that you actually need them.

With a minute phone call, some haven't been taken and the underlying issue has cleared. I presume they are just under so much pressure they try to clear backlogs

BennyCake

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2682 on: August 19, 2019, 08:30:37 AM »
So a United Ireland is to be decided by anti biotics and prescriptions :o

Similar issues swung the Scottish referendum a few years ago.

seafoid

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2683 on: August 19, 2019, 08:33:40 AM »
I know fine rightly a lot of them wonít like it, and theyíre welcome to move to Britain if it is that unbearable.

Should that have been the attitude of Unionists towards nationalists?

"You're welcome to move down south if you find Northern Ireland so unbearable."

Well the thing is, many people from the north *did* move, many were forced to do so.  That was and still is the attitude among some of the more loyal citizens in NI today. Luckily, Unionists will never have to face what Irish nationalists endured back when they ran the show in the north. So if they donít like the democracy the option to flourish in post-brexit Britain is always there for them
I will agree that some were forced but a tiny fraction. The majority who left NI left for the same reason as they left RoI and the poorer regions of Europe

The rest of your ďfree to leaveĒ rhetoric I will leave to those indulging in Orbanesque politics

Nationalist emigration was higher than Unionist for many years . This was by design.
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seafoid

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2684 on: August 19, 2019, 01:22:43 PM »
https://www.esri.ie/system/files/publications/OPEA173.pdf

"There is not an extensive literature on the performance of the NI economy, especially in the more recent period since the Good Friday Agreement; or how integrated the NI economy is with other GB regions or with the RoI economy. During the 1960s, the performance of the NI economy was relatively impressive with industrial production growing faster than the wider UK (Rowthorn, 1981). However, the 1970s saw a reversal of this trend, with the period being characterised by a rapid decline in the manufacturing base, very limited FDI and a rapid expansion in the services sector, predominately in the public sector (Rowthorn, 1981). In NI, employment in manufacturing and industrial production fell over the course of the 1970s, with the biggest losses in textiles, mechanical engineering and clothing and footwear (Rowthorn, 1981). This performance was much worse than the wider UK and contrasts with the experience of RoI where manufacturing and industrial employment expanded rapidly over the course of the decade (Rowthorn, 1981). Very few jobs were created by foreign multinationals investing in NI, which has largely been attributed to the Troubles (Bradley, 1996). Public sector employment expanded by 52% over the course of the 1970s, compared to just 22% in the UK as a whole, and while employment in police and prison services grew rapidly; there was also substantial increases in employment in health and education (Rowthorn, 1981). This reshaped the employment structure of the NI economy, so that by the early 1980s almost 40% of employment in NI was in the public sector (Teague, 2016). This expansion in public sector employment was facilitated by a large increase in the subvention to NI from the UK government, which helped in part to alleviate the impact of deindustrialisation; yet the underlying labour market prospects were poor (outside of the public sector) and the unemployment rate reached 20% in the early 1980s (Teague, 2016).
Michie and Sheehan (1998) investigated the extent to which the NI economy relates to that of GB and RoI by examining cointegration between the growth rates of NI, GB and RoI. Their findings lead the authors to conclude that the NI economy is in a Ďsomewhat anomalousí position as it was neither cointegrated with RoI nor with GB and also, at a regional level, not integrated with other parts in the UK. McGuinness and Sheehan (1998) examine the extent of regional convergence in the UK over the period 1970 to 1995. They show that despite growth in overall UK GDP per capita over the time period that that the ordering of regionsí share of GDP per capita practically remained constant, with NI and Wales consistently having the lowest per capita income. Moreover, they find some limited evidence of regional convergence in the UK and little evidence that NI was closely integrated with GB regional economies.1 Finally, there has been limited analysis of the hoped for Ďpeace dividendí following the signing of the Belfast Agreement. Teague (2016) concludes that the broad economic structure of the NI economy remains very similar to that of twenty years ago and is still heavily dependent on UK subvention with the public sector remaining the driver of the local economy"
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