Author Topic: The Haas Talks  (Read 24949 times)

orangeman

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #180 on: January 11, 2014, 07:10:35 PM »
That's the end of it now.

Sinn Féin's ruling executive has formally backed the Haass proposals on parades, flags, and the past.

The negotiations, chaired by former US diplomat Richard Haass, ended on New Year's Eve without agreement.

On Friday, DUP leader Peter Robinson said the Haass plan was unbalanced and required further work.

Sinn Féin and the SDLP have endorsed the proposals, but the DUP, UUP and Alliance have, so far, rejected elements of the Haass blueprint.

 Martin McGuinness spoke to reporters after the party executive met in Dublin
On Saturday in Dublin, Sinn Féin's Ard Chomhairle (national executive) agreed its response to the proposals.

Afterwards, Sinn Féin President Gerry Adams said the proposals were "a compromise position".

The party has called on the British and Irish governments to work with parties towards their implementation of the Haass plan.

Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness said: "We need to hear David Cameron say he supports the Haass proposals, we need to hear the taoiseach say he supports the Haass proposals and, hopefully, we will hear the president of the united States or the White House make it clear that they support the Haass proposals.

"One thing is absolutely clear. Richard Haass is telling the five parties in the north he wants to see the text of his seventh draft implemented

orangeman

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #181 on: January 25, 2014, 01:00:05 PM »
Maybe it's not the end at all - money talks.

Haass proposals:

Deal could secure extra money says Villiers


The government would seriously consider any Stormont request for additional resources should the parties reach a deal on flags, parades and the past, Theresa Villiers has said.

US diplomat Richard Haass chaired talks between the NI parties on the three contentious issues.

The secretary of state said she could not give any financial guarantees regarding the stalled Haass proposals.

However, she said she would examine any financial approach from the executive.

"We see the funding of these projects primarily coming from the block grant that the UK government already provides," Ms Villiers said.

"But I've also said that if there's a proposal from the political parties asking for extra funding, then, of course, that will be considered very seriously.

"But I have to be honest, given the deficit we inherited from the previous government and the pressing need to fix the public finances, I can't necessarily promise that additional funding will be available."

The Haass talks broke up without a deal on New Year's Eve.

Two of Northern Ireland's five main parties, Sinn Féin and the SDLP, endorsed the proposals, but the DUP, UUP and Alliance have, so far, rejected elements of the Haass blueprint.

The parties have since held more talks about the issues.

Earlier this week, Prime Minister David Cameron told the House of Commons the government would seek to impose a deal on the Northern Ireland parties.

muppet

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #182 on: January 25, 2014, 09:43:52 PM »
Maybe it's not the end at all - money talks.

Haass proposals:

Deal could secure extra money says Villiers


The government would seriously consider any Stormont request for additional resources should the parties reach a deal on flags, parades and the past, Theresa Villiers has said.

US diplomat Richard Haass chaired talks between the NI parties on the three contentious issues.

The secretary of state said she could not give any financial guarantees regarding the stalled Haass proposals.

However, she said she would examine any financial approach from the executive.

"We see the funding of these projects primarily coming from the block grant that the UK government already provides," Ms Villiers said.

"But I've also said that if there's a proposal from the political parties asking for extra funding, then, of course, that will be considered very seriously.

"But I have to be honest, given the deficit we inherited from the previous government and the pressing need to fix the public finances, I can't necessarily promise that additional funding will be available."

The Haass talks broke up without a deal on New Year's Eve.

Two of Northern Ireland's five main parties, Sinn Féin and the SDLP, endorsed the proposals, but the DUP, UUP and Alliance have, so far, rejected elements of the Haass blueprint.

The parties have since held more talks about the issues.

Earlier this week, Prime Minister David Cameron told the House of Commons the government would seek to impose a deal on the Northern Ireland parties.

Can anyone objectively explain to me why the Alliance Party rejected the proposals please?
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Minder

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #183 on: January 25, 2014, 10:11:22 PM »
Maybe it's not the end at all - money talks.

Haass proposals:

Deal could secure extra money says Villiers


The government would seriously consider any Stormont request for additional resources should the parties reach a deal on flags, parades and the past, Theresa Villiers has said.

US diplomat Richard Haass chaired talks between the NI parties on the three contentious issues.

The secretary of state said she could not give any financial guarantees regarding the stalled Haass proposals.

However, she said she would examine any financial approach from the executive.

"We see the funding of these projects primarily coming from the block grant that the UK government already provides," Ms Villiers said.

"But I've also said that if there's a proposal from the political parties asking for extra funding, then, of course, that will be considered very seriously.

"But I have to be honest, given the deficit we inherited from the previous government and the pressing need to fix the public finances, I can't necessarily promise that additional funding will be available."

The Haass talks broke up without a deal on New Year's Eve.

Two of Northern Ireland's five main parties, Sinn Féin and the SDLP, endorsed the proposals, but the DUP, UUP and Alliance have, so far, rejected elements of the Haass blueprint.

The parties have since held more talks about the issues.

Earlier this week, Prime Minister David Cameron told the House of Commons the government would seek to impose a deal on the Northern Ireland parties.

Can anyone objectively explain to me why the Alliance Party rejected the proposals please?

Wrong site muppet
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muppet

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #184 on: January 25, 2014, 10:19:18 PM »
Maybe it's not the end at all - money talks.

Haass proposals:

Deal could secure extra money says Villiers


The government would seriously consider any Stormont request for additional resources should the parties reach a deal on flags, parades and the past, Theresa Villiers has said.

US diplomat Richard Haass chaired talks between the NI parties on the three contentious issues.

The secretary of state said she could not give any financial guarantees regarding the stalled Haass proposals.

However, she said she would examine any financial approach from the executive.

"We see the funding of these projects primarily coming from the block grant that the UK government already provides," Ms Villiers said.

"But I've also said that if there's a proposal from the political parties asking for extra funding, then, of course, that will be considered very seriously.

"But I have to be honest, given the deficit we inherited from the previous government and the pressing need to fix the public finances, I can't necessarily promise that additional funding will be available."

The Haass talks broke up without a deal on New Year's Eve.

Two of Northern Ireland's five main parties, Sinn Féin and the SDLP, endorsed the proposals, but the DUP, UUP and Alliance have, so far, rejected elements of the Haass blueprint.

The parties have since held more talks about the issues.

Earlier this week, Prime Minister David Cameron told the House of Commons the government would seek to impose a deal on the Northern Ireland parties.

Can anyone objectively explain to me why the Alliance Party rejected the proposals please?

Wrong site muppet

That is a pity.

I could try to give an objective view of the Mayo football team's chances this year, I might fail but I could try.
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Myles Na G.

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #185 on: January 26, 2014, 04:02:38 PM »
Maybe it's not the end at all - money talks.

Haass proposals:

Deal could secure extra money says Villiers


The government would seriously consider any Stormont request for additional resources should the parties reach a deal on flags, parades and the past, Theresa Villiers has said.

US diplomat Richard Haass chaired talks between the NI parties on the three contentious issues.

The secretary of state said she could not give any financial guarantees regarding the stalled Haass proposals.

However, she said she would examine any financial approach from the executive.

"We see the funding of these projects primarily coming from the block grant that the UK government already provides," Ms Villiers said.

"But I've also said that if there's a proposal from the political parties asking for extra funding, then, of course, that will be considered very seriously.

"But I have to be honest, given the deficit we inherited from the previous government and the pressing need to fix the public finances, I can't necessarily promise that additional funding will be available."

The Haass talks broke up without a deal on New Year's Eve.

Two of Northern Ireland's five main parties, Sinn Féin and the SDLP, endorsed the proposals, but the DUP, UUP and Alliance have, so far, rejected elements of the Haass blueprint.

The parties have since held more talks about the issues.

Earlier this week, Prime Minister David Cameron told the House of Commons the government would seek to impose a deal on the Northern Ireland parties.

Can anyone objectively explain to me why the Alliance Party rejected the proposals please?
Alliance hasn't rejected the proposals. It has said that some progress was made on victims and has called on this part to be implemented. On the other two aspects, Alliance has accused the other parties of refusing to engage properly and of a lack of ambition. One example it cites is the refusal of the unionist parties to even consider licensing the flying of flags from lamp posts.
http://allianceparty.org/article/2014/008476/political-leadership-not-political-games-needed-to-make-progress-on-haass-says-alliance

muppet

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #186 on: January 26, 2014, 04:48:52 PM »
Alliance hasn't rejected the proposals. It has said that some progress was made on victims and has called on this part to be implemented. On the other two aspects, Alliance has accused the other parties of refusing to engage properly and of a lack of ambition. One example it cites is the refusal of the unionist parties to even consider licensing the flying of flags from lamp posts.
http://allianceparty.org/article/2014/008476/political-leadership-not-political-games-needed-to-make-progress-on-haass-says-alliance

Thanks for the link.

At first glance the Alliance position appears hypocritical and a bit.....em....nuts.

"Chris Lyttle MLA said: "The Alliance position is absolutely clear, and anyone who suggests otherwise is simply playing games. We proposed the Haass process in the first place, and committed ourselves fully throughout."

However now that Haas has concluded, they don't appear to have committed to the proposals.

They seem to claim that as their position is that the proposals on, for example, flags didn't go far enough, they are rejecting this part of the proposals. This is a de facto rejection of the overall process which has concluded.

This appears to me to be ridiculous given that the Nationalists & Republicans have accepted the proposals. They seem to want to re-work parts of Haas, which brings them into line with the very parties they are criticising.

Maybe I am misreading this?
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Myles Na G.

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #187 on: January 26, 2014, 06:08:04 PM »
Alliance hasn't rejected the proposals. It has said that some progress was made on victims and has called on this part to be implemented. On the other two aspects, Alliance has accused the other parties of refusing to engage properly and of a lack of ambition. One example it cites is the refusal of the unionist parties to even consider licensing the flying of flags from lamp posts.
http://allianceparty.org/article/2014/008476/political-leadership-not-political-games-needed-to-make-progress-on-haass-says-alliance

Thanks for the link.

At first glance the Alliance position appears hypocritical and a bit.....em....nuts.

"Chris Lyttle MLA said: "The Alliance position is absolutely clear, and anyone who suggests otherwise is simply playing games. We proposed the Haass process in the first place, and committed ourselves fully throughout."

However now that Haas has concluded, they don't appear to have committed to the proposals.

They seem to claim that as their position is that the proposals on, for example, flags didn't go far enough, they are rejecting this part of the proposals. This is a de facto rejection of the overall process which has concluded.

This appears to me to be ridiculous given that the Nationalists & Republicans have accepted the proposals. They seem to want to re-work parts of Haas, which brings them into line with the very parties they are criticising.

Maybe I am misreading this?
What is there really to implement? The stuff on the past, okay, but Alliance has said this bit should go ahead. There was absolutely no agreement or movement on flags, so nothing to do there. On parades, there was some agreement on setting up an alternative body to the parades commission, but does replacing one body with a different one designed to do the same thing really constitute some sort of progress? I think Alliance felt that by endorsing the outcome, they would be colluding in something of a con, that they would be supporting the idea that the talks had actually achieved something, when in reality they achieved little.

muppet

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #188 on: January 26, 2014, 06:10:21 PM »
Alliance hasn't rejected the proposals. It has said that some progress was made on victims and has called on this part to be implemented. On the other two aspects, Alliance has accused the other parties of refusing to engage properly and of a lack of ambition. One example it cites is the refusal of the unionist parties to even consider licensing the flying of flags from lamp posts.
http://allianceparty.org/article/2014/008476/political-leadership-not-political-games-needed-to-make-progress-on-haass-says-alliance

Thanks for the link.

At first glance the Alliance position appears hypocritical and a bit.....em....nuts.

"Chris Lyttle MLA said: "The Alliance position is absolutely clear, and anyone who suggests otherwise is simply playing games. We proposed the Haass process in the first place, and committed ourselves fully throughout."

However now that Haas has concluded, they don't appear to have committed to the proposals.

They seem to claim that as their position is that the proposals on, for example, flags didn't go far enough, they are rejecting this part of the proposals. This is a de facto rejection of the overall process which has concluded.

This appears to me to be ridiculous given that the Nationalists & Republicans have accepted the proposals. They seem to want to re-work parts of Haas, which brings them into line with the very parties they are criticising.

Maybe I am misreading this?
What is there really to implement? The stuff on the past, okay, but Alliance has said this bit should go ahead. There was absolutely no agreement or movement on flags, so nothing to do there. On parades, there was some agreement on setting up an alternative body to the parades commission, but does replacing one body with a different one designed to do the same thing really constitute some sort of progress? I think Alliance felt that by endorsing the outcome, they would be colluding in something of a con, that they would be supporting the idea that the talks had actually achieved something, when in reality they achieved little.

Sometimes a process concludes with 'much done, more to do'.

They can accept the findings and start work on the next step.
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Minder

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #189 on: February 24, 2014, 09:40:41 PM »
The Haas talks cost £243k, £132k on "travel and accommodation".

Sure it's only a bit of craic.
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orangeman

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #190 on: February 25, 2014, 12:25:58 AM »
The Haas talks cost £243k, £132k on "travel and accommodation".

Sure it's only a bit of craic.

Aye only a bit of crack.

Keep that train rolling on down the tracks.

give her dixie

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #191 on: February 25, 2014, 12:28:33 AM »
The Haas talks cost £243k, £132k on "travel and accommodation".

Sure it's only a bit of craic.

The sooner the party on the hill is stopped the better.
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

Tony Baloney

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #192 on: February 25, 2014, 12:32:53 AM »
The Haas talks cost £243k, £132k on "travel and accommodation".

Sure it's only a bit of craic.

The sooner the party on the hill is stopped the better.
Too many sucking at the teat for anything to happen now. Stuck with it.

orangeman

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #193 on: February 25, 2014, 12:33:52 AM »
The Haas talks cost £243k, £132k on "travel and accommodation".

Sure it's only a bit of craic.

The sooner the party on the hill is stopped the better.
Too many sucking at the teat for anything to happen now. Stuck with it.

This train isn't for stopping. It can't afford to stop.

give her dixie

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Re: The Haas Talks
« Reply #194 on: February 25, 2014, 12:38:20 AM »
Exactly folks. There is too much money coming from the British teat in Downing street for anyone to stop sucking and say hey, hold on a moment.
next stop, September 10, for number 4......