Author Topic: County GAA Crests.  (Read 556 times)

BennyCake

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Re: County GAA Crests.
« Reply #15 on: January 19, 2018, 07:41:04 PM »
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I take the diagonal buttresses to represent Navan Fort, although I'm not sure what the red stripe up the middle of it is about.
The tree is appropriate for the Orchard County.
The three-bar cross is, I think, the Papal cross, signifying the city of Armagh's status as the ecclesiastical capital of Ireland.

Personally I always preferred the simpler county coat of arms:

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As a youngster, I used to think the cross was an electric pole, and couldn't figure out what that had to do with Armagh

LooseCannon

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Re: County GAA Crests.
« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2018, 08:11:20 PM »
The offaly lads were outside the Pale but faithful to England according to Wiki.

We’re called the Faithful because we didn’t take the soup.
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LooseCannon

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Re: County GAA Crests.
« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2018, 08:12:11 PM »
Animals seem a feature of the Kerry crest
Sure didn’t PO say that they were animals.  ;)
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red hander

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Re: County GAA Crests.
« Reply #18 on: January 19, 2018, 09:28:49 PM »
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I take the diagonal buttresses to represent Navan Fort, although I'm not sure what the red stripe up the middle of it is about.
The tree is appropriate for the Orchard County.
The three-bar cross is, I think, the Papal cross, signifying the city of Armagh's status as the ecclesiastical capital of Ireland.

Personally I always preferred the simpler county coat of arms:

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As a youngster, I used to think the cross was an electric pole, and couldn't figure out what that had to do with Armagh

It was for putting up the 'Sniper At Work' sign.
 
« Last Edit: January 19, 2018, 10:50:42 PM by red hander »

general_lee

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Re: County GAA Crests.
« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2018, 09:59:59 PM »
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I take the diagonal buttresses to represent Navan Fort, although I'm not sure what the red stripe up the middle of it is about.
The tree is appropriate for the Orchard County.
The three-bar cross is, I think, the Papal cross, signifying the city of Armagh's status as the ecclesiastical capital of Ireland.

Personally I always preferred the simpler county coat of arms:

visitors can't see pics , please register or login


As a youngster, I used to think the cross was an electric pole, and couldn't figure out what that had to do with Armagh

It was for putting up the 'Sniper At Work' poster.
 
Red stripe represents proud tradition of diesel laundering

Lar Naparka

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Re: County GAA Crests.
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2018, 11:10:03 PM »
There’s a wee bit of a difference between the official (ie County Council) Mayo crest and the gah one. The elements of both are identical but there are two different logos.
The official one has one version, (Dia is Muire Linn) whereas the  GAA one usually has Críost Linn (Christ Be With Us) instead.
The elements are the same and there are a number of these.
The nine trees represent the 9 medieval baronies.  The official name of the county is Maigh Eo, the plain of the yew trees so the 9 displayed are yew.
The church on the hill stands for Croaghpatrick and the four crosses each denotes a diocese. Usually, these are displayed with a double-barreled (or whatever) one on top the other three. (Told ye this was complicated, didn’t I?)  ;D
That’s known as a Patriarchal Cross and the little ones are Passion Crosses. (No, I don't have an effin’ clue either.)
The boss cross represents the archdiocese of Tuam and ye can take yer pick with the other three, Achonry, KIllala and Kilmacduagh-Kilfenora.
Finally, the ship highlights the fact that Mayo is a maritime county.


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Avondhu star

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Re: County GAA Crests.
« Reply #21 on: Today at 12:49:24 AM »
The offaly lads were outside the Pale but faithful to England according to Wiki.
If you weren't so ignorant and studied your history you would know the Offaly lads did their bit unlike the Galway lads queuing up to join the Connaught Rangers
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Ciarrai_thuaidh

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Re: County GAA Crests.
« Reply #22 on: Today at 01:52:06 AM »
Kerry - The current Kerry GAA crest ìs new since 2012, and is a set of items supposed to reference elements of the county.

County name – A bold decorative Celtic-style Ciarraí brand featuring a crowned C which pays homage to the county’s moniker, 'The Kingdom'

Kerry’s people – St Brendan and his epic voyage: an inspiring tale of bravery, skill and innovation. The naomhóg (a craft associated with the coastal communities around Kerry) is propelled by a sail featuring a Celtic cross – the symbol of the GAA

Kerry’s fauna – Red Deer (Fia Rua): Ireland’s largest wild animal whose only remaining native herd is found on the slopes of Torc and Mangerton. These animals are believed to have had a continuous presence in Ireland since the end of the last Ice Age (c. 10,000 BC) and are steeped in folklore. It is said that ‘Tuan’, the King of the Deer, was given rights of free passage by Fionn McCool to the mountains of Kerry and that his blood line lives on in the present herd

Kerry’s landscape – Skellig Michael’s iconic silhouette rising out of the Atlantic Ocean. A designated UNESCO World Heritage site and famous around the globe

Kerry’s flora – KIllarney woodland fern that thrives in wild exotic places; an evocation of majestic mountains, valleys and hills

Kerry’s artistry – A background pattern of concentric circles inspired by the gilding on the Ballinclemisig ‘gold box’ (part of the ‘Kerry gold hoard’ in the National Museum) and by Bronze Age stone carvings found all over Kerry

Kerry’s birdlife – Storm Petrel (An Guairdeall): Kerry plays host to the largest numbers of this species anywhere in the world and is the world headquarters for breeding pairs

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A huge improvement on its predecessor which was far too cluttered IMHO:

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Well, forgive this "animal" for disagreeing massively with you on that one Eamonn!

I liked the old crest and was disgusted when I heard they were changing it because the idiots never properly registered the old crest as a trademark.  >:(

Fwiw the old crest showed:
- Rattoo round tower. Still, standing on the plains of North Kerry, this 900 year old structure has been used as a symbol by many organisations, including Ballyduff which is the nearest GAA club to it.
- The McGillicuddy reeks and Carrauntoohill. One of the most well known geographical features of Kerry and the country even. The reeks are the backdrop to Fitzgerald Stadium, so their use here was most appropriate I thought.
- The Cú Faoil (Wolfhound) which for so many centuries was a common sight in Kerry and Munster.
- The Harp to symbolise the pride in traditional music. The Harp has 9 strings for the 9 Baronies of Kerry.
- The oakwoods around the lakes of Killarney.
- The 4 shamrock leaves on the bottom, which are the same as are found on all Kerry championship medals. I don't know where this started or what it symbolises.
At the four compass points of the crest are 4 small crests with depictions of a Footballer, Hurler, Handballer and the 3 gold crowns, which represents the 3 traditional kingdoms that existed long ago in what is now Kerry.

The new crest, while my initial horror at it has somewhat faded - is still poor IMO. Too much flora and fauna focus and not enough that really resonates with GAA followers in Kerry, like the background of the Reeks for example. That's a precious image to all of us and reminds us of the backdrop to so many big days in Killarney. Storm petrels and deer..are not.  :-\ I do like having Sceilig Mhichíl there to be fair.
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seafoid

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Re: County GAA Crests.
« Reply #23 on: Today at 05:48:06 AM »
Kerry - The current Kerry GAA crest ìs new since 2012, and is a set of items supposed to reference elements of the county.

County name – A bold decorative Celtic-style Ciarraí brand featuring a crowned C which pays homage to the county’s moniker, 'The Kingdom'

Kerry’s people – St Brendan and his epic voyage: an inspiring tale of bravery, skill and innovation. The naomhóg (a craft associated with the coastal communities around Kerry) is propelled by a sail featuring a Celtic cross – the symbol of the GAA

Kerry’s fauna – Red Deer (Fia Rua): Ireland’s largest wild animal whose only remaining native herd is found on the slopes of Torc and Mangerton. These animals are believed to have had a continuous presence in Ireland since the end of the last Ice Age (c. 10,000 BC) and are steeped in folklore. It is said that ‘Tuan’, the King of the Deer, was given rights of free passage by Fionn McCool to the mountains of Kerry and that his blood line lives on in the present herd

Kerry’s landscape – Skellig Michael’s iconic silhouette rising out of the Atlantic Ocean. A designated UNESCO World Heritage site and famous around the globe

Kerry’s flora – KIllarney woodland fern that thrives in wild exotic places; an evocation of majestic mountains, valleys and hills

Kerry’s artistry – A background pattern of concentric circles inspired by the gilding on the Ballinclemisig ‘gold box’ (part of the ‘Kerry gold hoard’ in the National Museum) and by Bronze Age stone carvings found all over Kerry

Kerry’s birdlife – Storm Petrel (An Guairdeall): Kerry plays host to the largest numbers of this species anywhere in the world and is the world headquarters for breeding pairs

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A huge improvement on its predecessor which was far too cluttered IMHO:

visitors can't see pics , please register or login


Well, forgive this "animal" for disagreeing massively with you on that one Eamonn!

I liked the old crest and was disgusted when I heard they were changing it because the idiots never properly registered the old crest as a trademark.  >:(

Fwiw the old crest showed:
- Rattoo round tower. Still, standing on the plains of North Kerry, this 900 year old structure has been used as a symbol by many organisations, including Ballyduff which is the nearest GAA club to it.
- The McGillicuddy reeks and Carrauntoohill. One of the most well known geographical features of Kerry and the country even. The reeks are the backdrop to Fitzgerald Stadium, so their use here was most appropriate I thought.
- The Cú Faoil (Wolfhound) which for so many centuries was a common sight in Kerry and Munster.
- The Harp to symbolise the pride in traditional music. The Harp has 9 strings for the 9 Baronies of Kerry.
- The oakwoods around the lakes of Killarney.
- The 4 shamrock leaves on the bottom, which are the same as are found on all Kerry championship medals. I don't know where this started or what it symbolises.
At the four compass points of the crest are 4 small crests with depictions of a Footballer, Hurler, Handballer and the 3 gold crowns, which represents the 3 traditional kingdoms that existed long ago in what is now Kerry.

The new crest, while my initial horror at it has somewhat faded - is still poor IMO. Too much flora and fauna focus and not enough that really resonates with GAA followers in Kerry, like the background of the Reeks for example. That's a precious image to all of us and reminds us of the backdrop to so many big days in Killarney. Storm petrels and deer..are not.  :-\ I do like having Sceilig Mhichíl there to be fair.

It's a pity they can't mix media and put the sunday game theme tune on a flag. They loved it in Kerry in the 1980s

https://youtu.be/zjieoLrQkm0

At 5.09
"you can try and intimidate us, but f**k youse, we're going to win an All-Ireland anyway"