Author Topic: Palestinian prisoners on Hunger Strike  (Read 4616 times)

give her dixie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2169
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 61 days now, and is near death
« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2012, 02:00:58 PM »
Latest news on Khader Adnan, now on his 61st day on hunger strike, shackeld to his bed

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/feb/16/khader-adnan-palestinian-hunger-strike

A Palestinian prisoner on his 61st day of hunger strike while shackled to a bed in an Israeli hospital is in immediate danger of death, according to a medical report submitted to the supreme court in an effort to secure his release.

Khader Adnan, 33, a baker from a village near Jenin, is being held without charge by the Israeli authorities under a four-month term of "administrative detention". He began his hunger strike on 18 December, the day after being arrested.

Adnan's lawyers have submitted a petition for his release to Israel's supreme court, but no date has been set for a hearing. The situation was urgent, lawyer Mahmoud Kassandra told the Guardian. "This is the last chance. The medical report says he could die at any minute. We hope this will succeed but I am not optimistic."

Adnan's hunger strike is in protest at his detention without charge or being told of any evidence against him, and over his claims of abuse and degrading treatment during arrest and interrogation. This is his ninth period of detention, according to reports. In the past he has acted as a spokesman for the militant group Islamic Jihad.

He was examined by a doctor from Physicians for Human Rights on Wednesday at the Rebecca Ziv hospital in Safed. Adnan was shackled by both legs and one arm, the doctor reported.

"He has lost 30kg and weighs 60kg. He suffers from stomach aches, vomiting, sometimes with blood, and headaches … His general condition is pale and very weak, his tongue is smooth, he has slight bleeding from the gums, dry skin, loss of hair, and significant muscular atrophy. His pulse is weak, blood pressure 100/75. He is permanently connected to a heart monitor."

Adnan agreed to be treated with an infusion of liquids and salts, with the addition of glucose and vitamins, the doctor reported. "However, he maintains his refusal to end his hunger strike." He was lucid and aware.

He was "in immediate danger of death," the doctor concluded. "An absolute hunger strike in excess of 50 days causes the decomposition of muscles... and the creation of toxins in the body. Death may occur suddenly, due to heart failure or the result of infection following the collapse of the immune system. Bleeding in the digestive tracts and renal or hepatic failure are possible.

"A fast in excess of 70 days does not permit survival. Infusion of liquids, adjustment of salts, and the addition of glucose and vitamin cannot prevent certain death due to such a protracted hunger strike."

Adnan's wife, Randa, his two daughters and his father were permitted to visit him on Wednesday, although his mother, sister and brother were refused.

"Randa told me he was very thin and his health was worsening but his mental health is good," his sister Maali said from the family home in Arrada. "But the whole family is worried, and Randa doesn't know if she will see him again."

Adnan's elder daughter, also called Maali, who is nearly four, understood her father is very sick and was anxious about giving him a hug, the older Maali said. "She is telling her mother, please stop crying." The younger daugher, Bissan, is 18 months and Randa is six months pregnant with the couple's third child.

Following the visit, Adnan's father addressed a demonstration outside the hospital in solidarity with Adnan, reporting that his son's morale was high. "He does not undertake this hunger strike for its own sake, but he yearns for freedom for his people, for his countrymen, in order to live with heads held up high, without occupation," Jihad Adnan told protesters.

Thousands of Palestinians and other supporters of Adnan have protested in the West Bank and Gaza, and outside Ofer military prison near Jerusalem. There have been clashes with police, who have fired tear gas and rubber bullets.

According to Addameer, a Palestinian prisoners' support group, detainees in other prisons have also begun refusing food.

Many protesters say Adnan has become a symbol of Israel's occupation and its treatment of prisoners. More than 300 Palestinians are held under "administrative detention" orders in Israeli prisons.

The Palestinian Authority has appealed for Adnan's release. Physicians for Human Rights on Thursday urged to Israel's president, Shimon Peres, to intervene in the case because of the prisoner's dire medical condition.

Earlier this week, an Israeli military court rejected an appeal against Adnan's continued detention. The Israeli prison service has said Adnan was being dealt with in accordance to his "definition as a security-administrative prisoner" and with humanitarian sensitivity.

Adnan's hunger strike has attracted a big following on Twitter and Facebook. Many of his supporters complain his case is being ignored by the mainstream media. There has been little coverage in the Israeli and international press.

Bobby Sands, the Irish republican prisoner who died on hunger strike in a Northern Ireland prison in 1981, lasted 66 days without food. According to the British Medical Association, death generally occurs between 55 and 75 days of a hunger strike.
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

give her dixie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2169
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 61 days now, and is near death
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2012, 02:10:03 PM »
Another good article from an Irish journalist on Storyful, which includes messages
of support from Tommy McKearney who went 53 days on Hunger Strike in 1980,
and from Oliver Hughes, who lost his brother Francis after 59 days, and his cousin
Thomas McElwee after 62 days in 1981

http://storyful.com/stories/1000021898
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

seafoid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7508
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 61 days now, and is near death
« Reply #17 on: February 16, 2012, 02:54:01 PM »
Israel and the dream of the return to Zion has turned into a desperate colonial mess.

give her dixie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2169
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 61 days now, and is near death
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2012, 03:00:56 PM »
Saving Khader Adnan's life is saving our own soul

Richard Falk, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Palestinian human rights.

The world watches as tragedy unfolds beneath its gaze. Khader Adnan is entering his 61st day as a hunger striker in an Israeli prison, being held under an administrative detention order without trial, charges, or any indication of the evidence against him.

From the outset of his brutal arrest in the middle of the night - in the presence of his wife and young daughters - he has been subject to the sort of inhumane and degrading treatment that is totally unlawful and morally inexcusable. Its only justification is to intimidate, if not terrify, Palestinians who have lived for 45 years under the yoke of an oppressive occupation. This occupation continuously whittles away at Palestinians' rights under international humanitarian law - especially their right to self-determination, which is encroached upon every time a new housing unit is added to the colonising settlements that dot the hilltops surrounding Jerusalem and the West Bank.


 Hundreds of Palestinians join hunger strike
The case of Khader Adnan is a revealing microcosm of the unbearable cruelty of prolonged occupation. It draws a contrast in the West between the dignity of an Israeli prisoner and the steadfast refusal to heed the abuse of thousands of Palestinians languishing in Israeli jails through court sentence or administrative order.

Mr Adnan's father poignantly highlighted this contrast a few days ago by referring to Gilad Shalit, the Israeli soldier held by Hamas in captivity for several years and recently released in good health: "Where are the mother and father of Gilad Shalit? Do they not feel for me in this humanitarian case? Where are they?" He went further in drawing this comparison: "My son was arrested from his house, from among his wife and children, was taken prisoner. He was not carrying any weapon. Whereas Shalit was fighting against the people of Gaza, and destroying their homes, and firing upon, and Shalit was released."

It is true that foreign authority figures, from the UN Secretary General on down, showed their empathy for the agony experienced by Israelis concerned for the wellbeing of Shalit, but these same personalities are notably silent in the much more compelling ordeal being experienced before our eyes in the form of Mr Adnan's captivity, seemingly unto death. It should not be surprising that surviving family members of IRA hunger strikers should step forward expressing solidarity with Mr Adnan and compare the Irish experience of resistance to that of the Palesinians.

And who is Khader Adnan? We do not know very much about him except that he is a member of the Islamic Jihad Party. There are no accusations against him that implicate him in violence against civilians. His fellow prisoner from an earlier period of confinement in Ashkelon Prison, Abu Maria, recalls his normalcy and humanity while sharing a cell, emphasising his interest in informing other Palestinians: "Prison was like a university in those times and he was one of the professors." Commenting on his hunger strike that has brought him extreme pain, Abu Maria says he is convinced that Khader Asnan wants to live, but will not live in humiliation: "He is showing his commitment and resistance in the only way he can right now, with his body."

Adameer, the respected Palestinian NGO concerned with prisoners, "holds Israel accountable for the life of Khader Adnan, whose health has entered an alarmingly critical stage that will now have irreversible consequences and could lead to his fatal collapse at any moment". Physicians who have observed his current condition conclude that, at most, he could live a few more days, saying that such a hunger strike cannot be sustained beyond 70 days in any event. Any attempt at forced feeding to keep a prisoner from dying is widely viewed as an additional abuse, a form of torture.

Finally, the reliance by Israel on administrative detention in cases of this sort is totally unacceptable from the perspective of the Geneva Convention, especially so when no disclosure of the exceptional circumstances that might warrant for reasons of imminent security the use of such an extra-legal form of imprisonment. There are currently at least 300 Palestinians being held in a manner similar to that of Mr Adnan, and so it is no wonder that sympathy hunger strikes among Palestinians are underway as expressions of solidarity.

Have we not reached a stage in our appreciation of human rights that we should outlaw such state barbarism? Let us hope that the awful experience of Khader Adnan does not end with his death, and let us hope further that it sparks a worldwide protest against both administrative detention and prisoner abuse. The Palestinian people have suffered more than enough already.

Richard Falk is Albert G. Milbank Professor Emeritus of International Law at Princeton University and Visiting Distinguished Professor in Global and International Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has authored and edited numerous publications spanning a period of five decades, most recently editing the volume International Law and the Third World: Reshaping Justice (Routledge, 2008).

He is currently serving his third year of a six-year term as a United Nations Special Rapporteur on Palestinian human rights.

Follow him on Twitter: @rfalk13
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

give her dixie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2169
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 61 days now, and is near death
« Reply #19 on: February 17, 2012, 01:27:07 AM »
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/the-west-banks-bobby-sands-6988943.html

The West Bank's Bobby Sands

Khader Adnan's two-month hunger strike has made him a hero among Palestinians outraged by Israel's policy of arbitrary detention


It was only after talking with lucidity and animation for an hour about her husband's 61-day hunger strike that Randa Jihad Adnan's eyes, visible though the opening of her nekab, filled with tears. Until then, this articulate 31-year-old graduate in sharia law from Al Najar University in Nablus, the pregnant mother of two young daughters aged four and one and half, had described with almost disconcerting poise the two months following the arrest of her husband, Khader Adnan, on 17 December.

He was seized at 3.30am by some of the scores of Israeli military and security personnel who surrounded the family home in a West Bank village south of Jenin, and is now being held in the Israeli Rebecca Ziv hospital in Safed. Yesterday she was allowed to visit him with the children and her father-in-law.

There they found him, weak and extremely thin, his beard unkempt and his fingernails long. He was shackled by two legs and one arm to his bed, and was connected to a heart monitor. Though mentally alert, he could speak only with difficulty. "I was shocked," she said yesterday. "I couldn't speak for about three minutes, and it was the same for my daughters."

Mrs Adnan is convinced that the Israeli authorities only allowed the visit because they wanted the family to put pressure on her husband to end his hunger strike. He had started this on 18 December in protest at his arrest, his treatment and the subsequent detention order served on him.

"My father-in-law said to him: 'We want you to stay alive. You cannot defeat this state on your own.' He told him he wanted him to end the strike. I told him I wished he would drink a cup of milk. But he said: 'I did not expect this from you. I know you are with me all the time. Please stop it." Mrs Adnan said yesterday: "I know my husband. He will not change his mind. I expect him to die."

The day before the visit, a Red Cross delegation had gone to her home to warn her that her husband's heart could fail "at any minute". They told her that he was suffering from muscular atrophy, which was affecting his heart and stomach, that his pulse was weak, and that his life was now in extreme danger.

Physicians for Human Rights issued a medical report this week supporting a petition to the Supreme Court for his release. In it the group said that even though Mr Adnan had agreed to be treated with an infusion of liquids and salts, augmented by glucose and vitamins, he had refused to end his hunger strike and was in "immediate danger of death". The report added that a fast "in excess of 70 days does not permit survival".

The Supreme Court petition, for which no date has been set for a hearing, is the last judicial chance to save his life as Mr Adnan has said he will not end his fast until he is released from his four months of administrative detention. A military appeals court ruled this week that he must remain in detention until May.

Mr Adnan, 33, a mathematics graduate who runs a bakery in nearby Qabatya, has long been politically active. He has been convicted for being a spokesman of Islamic Jihad, one of the most militant Palestinian factions. And he has been arrested numerous times by Israel, and at least once by the Palestinian Authority, since leading a student demonstration in 1999 at Bir Zeit University against the visiting French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin.

But his family insists that he has never been involved in violence; nor has he been charged with it. Indeed, on this occasion, he has not been charged with any crime. His hunger strike has focused growing attention on the practice of administrative detention, in which Palestinians can be held without trial and on the basis of secret intelligence dossiers which are not shown to the defendant or his lawyers.

With international groups like Human Rights Watch demanding his release, and almost daily demonstrations in his support outside the Ofer military court near Ramallah, his case is fast taking on some of the political resonances of Bobby Sands, the most famous of the 10 IRA prisoners who died on hunger strike in prison in Northern Ireland in the early 1980s. Sands, an elected MP, died after 66 days without food.

Sitting with her older daughter, Maali, in front of a poster of her husband proclaiming "I reject administrative detention and I will continue the hunger strike until I am released", Mrs Adnan said that he is determined to continue his fast. His resolve has been hardened, she said, not only by his summary arrest and its circumstances (he was seized while in the lavatory) but by his treatment during interrogation. She claimed her husband had been held for seven-hour periods – interspersed with one-hour breaks – on a short chair with his hands tied behind its back, causing him intense discomfort, and that parts of his beard had been torn out by interrogators.

She said he had also been subject to psychological pressure, which his lawyers told her he raised in one of his several military court appearances. "They told him bad words about me. They said 'your wife is not pure'. They told him 'now you have been arrested she is free to do anything.'" She says he told the military court that one interrogator later admitted to him: "We know you love your wife and that she loves you. That's why we said things against her."

Mrs Adnan, who said that her husband had repeatedly declared that "my honour is more precious than food", added that her only hope now is that Israel will decide "to whiten its face in the world by releasing him". She said that it is for him to take the final decision, and that when she urged him to drink milk she was mainly carrying "a message from his mother."

Mr Adnan's sister – also called Maali – tentatively acknowledged the possibility that her brother might yet be persuaded that he had done enough to transmit his message to the world protesting about the use of administrative detention without trial or charge. But, saying that Mr Adnan was a model father who "loves life", she added: "I am not sure that he wants just to deliver a message. He also wants to end the administrative detention. We have so much faith in Allah to get him out of this situation. We believe that God will not let him down."

Randa Adnan recalled that her husband told one of his lawyers: "I do now want to go to oblivion or death. But I am a man who defends his freedom. If I die it will be my fate."
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

seafoid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7508
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 62 days now, and is near death
« Reply #20 on: February 17, 2012, 09:21:37 AM »
"Where are the mother and father of Gilad Shalit?

hypocrisy is the greatest luxury

glens abu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1714
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 62 days now, and is near death
« Reply #21 on: February 17, 2012, 09:26:31 AM »
Ireland and EU must intervene to save the life of Palestinian hunger striker – Sinn Féin

February 16th, 2012 - Pádraig Mac Lochlainn TD

As the Palestinian hunger striker Khader Adnan nears death, Sinn Féin spokesperson on Foreign Affairs, Pádraig Mac Lochlainn has called on the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs, Eamon Gilmore and his European counterparts to urgently intervene to save h...is life and demand that the Israeli state meet their responsibilities under international law.

Mr Adnan is being held without charge by the Israeli state under their “administrative detention” system.

Deputy Mac Lochlainn said:

“United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories, Richard Falk has expressed his urgent and extreme concern regarding Khader Adnan, and urged the international community to intervene on his behalf so it is not good enough for the Tánaiste to simply express concern.

“I am calling on the Tánaiste and his European counterparts to urgently intervene to save Khader Adnan’s life.

“The practice of ‘administrative detentions’ is clearly unjust and has been used systematically as part of the military occupation of the Palestinian territories by the Israeli state.

“Over the years Israel has administratively detained thousands of Palestinians for prolonged periods of time without prosecution, without informing them of the charges against them, and without allowing their solicitors to study the evidence making a mockery of the protections specified in Israeli and international law to protect the right of liberty and due process, the right of defendants to state their case and the presumption of innocence.

“There are 308 Palestinians are currently being held “administrative detentions”

“Apportioning political labels to detainees is no justification for prolonged imprisonment without trial”.

Trout

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 243
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 62 days now, and is near death
« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2012, 12:09:18 PM »
Thank god for those Sinn Fein (Official sponsors of the Queens Jubilee) and those press releases, we're would we be without them?
Sinn Fein delivers -

British rule

glens abu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1714
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 62 days now, and is near death
« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2012, 05:44:02 PM »
Thank god for those Sinn Fein (Official sponsors of the Queens Jubilee) and those press releases, we're would we be without them?

You have to turn a thread about a mans life into point scoring TOUT,but you should try and see the bigger picture even if that is difficult for you.



SF ENSURING EQUALITY IN BELFAST ANNIVERSARIES
Sinn Féin are ensuring that equality is at the core of Belfast City Council’s work on Historic Anniversaries.

Following the news yesterday that Council is to unanimously support a funding package for events to mark the British Queen’s Jubilee, Sinn Féin Council Group Leader Jim McVeigh has explained that the overall approach to important anniversari...es requires generosity and sensitivity from all parties.

A framework for approaching the issue of important anniversaries (including centenary of 1916, women’s suffrage movement and 1913 Lockout) has been agreed by all parties through the Council’s ‘Diversity Working Group’. The group is also tasked with dealing with City Hall Memorabilia and the Flag outside City Hall.

Commenting on the work of the group, Cllr McVeigh said

“We have brought a fresh approach to the work of the Diversity Working Group, an approach that is sensitive and generous, given the importance of the work to all of Belfast citizens. Embedding equality into this work is central to our approach. On that basis, agreement has already been reached that a Civic Dinner will be held in City Hall to mark the Centenary of 1916 rising.”

“We also bring our Republican, anti-sectarian and anti-monarchist ideology to this work. Our republican approach is one of inclusion and equality. Therefore, when it comes to supporting issues such as funding for groups to mark the British Queen’s Jubilee, we are content. Not just because there are agreed principles and a framework for this decision that includes other events, but also because we are conscious that this particular initiative is important to Unionist citizens in our city.

“We look forward to developing the work of this group into the coming decade, further embedding equality into Belfast Council and ensuring tough issues are dealt with in a mature and sensitive way.”


give her dixie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2169
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 62 days now, and is near death
« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2012, 06:22:24 PM »
http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2012/02/201221715355300838.html

Sixty-one days. That is how long it’s been since Khader Adnan has eaten.

The 33-year-old Palestinian was taken from his home in Arrabeh village near Jenin in the occupied West Bank at 3:30am on December 17. One day later he began his hunger strike to protest against the "humiliation and policy of administrative detention". Adnan, like hundreds of other Palestinians, was arrested under a military order that Israel has named "administrative detention", which allows prisoners to be held without charge or trial for periods of up to six months, spells that can be renewed indefinitely.

Sahar Francis is a lawyer with Addameer, a prisoner rights groups based in the West Bank city of Ramallah, and a member of Khader Adnan’s legal team. She visited the hunger striker in Ziv hospital in Safad, Israel, on Friday.

She described her client, who remains shackled to his hospital bed, as "mentally perfect, but physically very weak".

Francis told Al Jazeera that Adnan was being given only glucose and other sugars through an intravenous drip, but refusing anything else that would be considered a breach of his protest. Doctors told Francis that he could suffer from a heart attack or from the failure of other internal organs and die at any moment.

Adnan's family and legal team were hoping that he would be released this week when his case went before a military appeals court. However, the appeal was denied and the court ordered that Adnan must finish the four month administrative detention, set to end on May 8.

In response to Al Jazeera’s request for an interview, the Israeli military sent a statement that read:

"Khader Adnan was arrested with an administrative arrest warrant for activities that threaten regional security. This warrant was authorised by a judicial review."

Francis and Adnan's legal team argue that, after losing some 40kg from more than 60 days without food, Adnan is wheelchair-bound and too weak to pose a risk to anyone.

Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have both called on the Israeli authorities either to release Adnan or immediately charge him with criminal offences and have him tried.

Prison knowledge

For Adnan, like many Palestinians in the occupied territories, incarceration is not an uncommon experience. According to Addameer, in January there were more than 4,400 Palestinian "political prisoners" in Israeli jails. Of them, 310 were being held under administrative detention.

Adnan, who in the past was convicted of being a spokesperson for the Islamic Jihad armed group, has, according to his family, been detained nine times since his first arrest as a student activist in 1999.

It was soon after his first imprisonment that he met Mousa Abu Maria in Ashkelon prison. Abu Maria, the same age as Adnan, explained to Al Jazeera how, for many, prison is like a "university", where prisoners teach each other about global struggles and discuss how they relate to their own as Palestinians.

"The old prisoners tell the new prisoners about history of the past and when people make hunger strike and how the situation changed," he said.

The history lessons seem to spread quickly through the prisons.

"The first time that people start to talk about hunger strike, I started to hear from them about how they [could] start. Sometime they started to talk room to room about hunger strike and the goal in going on hunger strike."

The stories, Abu Maria said, "give you power and hope".

One of the stories commonly told among Palestinians inside Israeli prisons is of the ten republican prisoners in Northern Ireland who died as a result of their hunger strike in 1981. Most famous among them was 27-year-old Provisional IRA member Bobby Sands, who was elected to the British parliament during his fast, and died after 66 days of refusing to eat. This, and other hunger strikes and organised actions, were believed to have improved prisoners' conditions and made gains for their nationalist cause.

Since the rise of a Palestinian nationalist movement in the late 1960s and 1970s to combat Israeli occupation, hunger striking has been a common tactic among Palestinian prisoners that, according to Addameer's Francis, has frequenty succeeded in improving the conditions of their incarceration.

Stories such as Sands', Abu Maria said, "made us think that hunger strike is the only way a prisoner can resist".

Abu Maria served almost five years of his prison sentence and was released in 2003. However, like Adnan, he faced ongoing harassment from Israeli officials. Abu Maria's home and that of his family was later raided by Israeli soldiers, and he was eventually rearrested and placed under administrative detention in 2009.

Abu Maria told Al Jazeera that not knowing what the charges against him were - and when he would be released - made being jailed all the more difficult. He said the more than 14 months he spent under administration detention was "a really bad time in my life". 

"Now Khader is in a bad condition, and any time he can die," Abu Maria said.

With protests in solidarity with Khader Adnan already happening both in the occupied territories and inside Israel, Abu Maria said there would be widespread rage if Adnan were to die.

"I believe, if he dies, the situation in Palestine will change very fast. We can have a third intifada ["uprising"]."

Few options left

With the military's case against prisoners kept secret to both the defendant and legal teams, Addameer's Francis said defending clients under administrative detention is incredibly difficult, if not impossible. 

"You don’t have any tools to build a defence," Francis said. "This is the most serious problem for any lawyer in administrative detention cases."

She pointed out that, while administrative detention may be considered short-term, Addameer has documented cases showing prisoners kept in jail for up to six to eight years, with their detention renewed every six months.

In 2009, the UN committee against torture expressed concern with the "inordinately lengthy periods" that Israel gives prisoners and reported that it could constitute cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.

"Administrative detention thus deprives detainees of basic safeguards, including the right to challenge the evidence which is the basis for the detention, warrants are not required, and the detainee may be de facto in incommunicado detention for an extended period, subject to renewal."

After a millitary court rejected Adnan's appeal on Monday, Francis is hoping that Israel's high court will agree to review his case, including its secret evidence, in the coming days - and make a decision to release him, by either cancelling his sentence or shortening it to the time he has already served. "This is the last channel [available to us] in the Israeli legal system," Francis said.

Randa Adnan, Khader's pregnant wife and the mother of the couple's two young daughters, told the UK's Independent on Thursday: "I know my husband. He will not change his mind. I expect him to die."

With no media allowed access to prisoners, Adnan's own words have only been available through a letter that he gave to one of his lawyers on a recent visit. The Ma'an news agency, based in the occupied West Bank, published parts of the letter translated into English:

"The Israeli occupation has gone to extremes against our people, especially prisoners. I have been humiliated, beaten, and harassed by interrogators for no reason, and thus I swore to God I would fight the policy of administrative detention to which I and hundreds of my fellow prisoners fell prey."

"Here I am in a hospital bed surrounded with prison wardens, handcuffed, and my foot tied to the bed," the letter continued. "The only thing I can do is offer my soul to God, as I believe righteousness and justice will eventually triumph over tyranny and oppression."
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

Windmill abu

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 468
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 62 days now, and is near death
« Reply #25 on: February 18, 2012, 01:51:18 AM »
Quote
Thank god for those Sinn Fein (Official sponsors of the Queens Jubilee) and those press releases, we're would we be without them?

The GAA Board should be ashamed for allowing this post while someone dies for their beliefs
I wake up in the morning and I piss excellence

give her dixie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2169
    • View Profile
Re: Palestinian man on hunger strike for 62 days now, and is near death
« Reply #26 on: February 18, 2012, 05:13:18 AM »
Will post tomorrow at length, as Khader has now entered his 63rd day on Hunger strike........
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

seafoid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7508
    • View Profile
Re: Khader Adnan, on Hunger Strike for 63 days
« Reply #27 on: February 18, 2012, 10:23:49 AM »
The Israeli/Palestinian conflict is entering a new phase  driven by the realisation on the Palestinian side that the Israelis
were never going to give them a state. The last 20 years of negotiations were a waste of time.

When the negotiations started in Oslo in 1991 there were 300,000 settlers. Today there are 750,000.

Israeli deputy speaker Danny Danon explains that all of the land belongs to the Jews and the Palestinians can f*ck off

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/talktojazeera/2011/08/201185103022120129.html

This hunger strike is only the start of what we will see. The Palestinians will gain their rights but the question is will Israel survive this. 




« Last Edit: February 18, 2012, 10:35:23 AM by seafoid »

thejuice

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5483
    • View Profile
    • Oculus Design
Re: Khader Adnan, on Hunger Strike for 63 days
« Reply #28 on: February 18, 2012, 01:50:46 PM »
it has a strong parallel with apartheid South Africa but unfortunately the propaganda has been successful in dividing public opinion and political action.

seafoid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7508
    • View Profile
Re: Khader Adnan, on Hunger Strike for 63 days
« Reply #29 on: February 18, 2012, 02:44:05 PM »
it has a strong parallel with apartheid South Africa but unfortunately the propaganda has been successful in dividing public opinion and political action.
. South Africa looked untouchable in the 50s too. It all depends on whether or not Israel can manage to get the next generation of consumers behind the settlers   and without destroying its own society.