Author Topic: Middle East landscape rapidly changing  (Read 97564 times)

Declan

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #45 on: January 31, 2011, 11:27:20 AM »
Quote
Amazing video that is a riposte to all of the Islamophobia out there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hBV0ApIh_4&feature=player_embedded

Powerful stuff

give her dixie

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #46 on: January 31, 2011, 11:27:53 AM »
Very interesting articles Seafoid, and I had been reading them over the past few days.
The one main agenda that US/Israel and the west are trying to push is the idea of an Islamic state
been formed in Egypt. So far, they can't tie that in as both the Christain and Muslim population are
united together in support of getting rid of Mubarak.

Plus, the Muslim Brotherhood who have been banned by Egypt for years have thrown their weight
behind ElBaradei, along with the Christains, trade unions, and other major opposition parties.

The population want democratic elections, and if they get them, ElBaradei will sweep to power.
There is no going back now for the people, as they have now got Mubarak on the ropes, and
he has no support in Egypt to stay on.

The best the west can do now is to engage in dialogue with ElBaraedi, and get themselves
prepared for their withdrawl from Egypt. The people have had enough of their interference,
and they need to pack up and go home, and leave the running of the country to the democratically
elected leaders when there is a new Government installed. From today, the US have chartered planes
to take the 60,000 or so US citizens in Egypt out to European countries. Their withdrawl has started......

The great lie of "Bringing Democracy To The Middle East" has been exposed, and instead, the world
has seen how the US had no intention of allowing democracy there, and instead fully supported brutal
dictators. This is no doubt the beginning of the end of the US empire in the middle east.
From the military defeats in Afghanistan and Iraq, to the overthrow of their prized dictators, the
time has no come for them to pack up and go home. Plus, with the release of the "Palestine Papers",
the world has seen that US/Israel had never any intention of peace, and that land was all they want.

Maybe if the US had spent money on peace and stability in the middle east instead of killing and
oppressing people by the millions, they would be better thought of. However, it's now too late
for them to save face, and they have been exposed.

Don't let the door hit you on  the way out Uncle Sam............
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

give her dixie

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #47 on: January 31, 2011, 11:43:32 AM »
Amazing video that is a riposte to all of the Islamophobia out there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hBV0ApIh_4&feature=player_embedded

An incredible video that sums up the mood of a nation. His passion and emotion is replicated throughout
Egypt, and that is why the nation has stood up. What a man, and what a speech.

Click on the following link for a Sky News interview with George Galloway yesterday.
Very good interview, and a surprise from Sky...............

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_A7Qh_jcFV8
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

Nally Stand

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #48 on: January 31, 2011, 11:45:14 AM »
"The island of saints & scholars...and gombeens & fuckin' arselickers" Christy Moore

seafoid

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #49 on: January 31, 2011, 12:01:07 PM »
The prof from Suez Canal uni who was on prime Time last week was superb. Unfortunately they cut him off because of time but he had his fingers on the pulse of why this intifada is happening.

9 million young women can't get married because 9 million young men can't afford to support a family because they have not enough in earnings to put food on the table and a roof overhead.

This is a disaster for Israel. Where is Tyrones own with his know nothing neocon analysis when the whole philosophy is being walked into the ground by the brave people of Egypt?   

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give her dixie

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #50 on: January 31, 2011, 12:54:20 PM »
Will be tuned in all right on Thursday night. Looks like a good show coming up from Louis.
Will certainly open people peoples eyes as to how fanatical those illegal settlers are, and how
they are an obstacle to peace in the region.

Below is a good article from Haaratz that sums up the US position in the middle east right now.
http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/news/obama-will-go-down-in-history-as-the-president-who-lost-egypt-1.340057

Obama will go down in history as the president who lost Egypt

By Aluf Benn

Jimmy Carter will go down in American history as "the president who lost Iran," which during his term went from being a major strategic ally of the United States to being the revolutionary Islamic Republic. Barack Obama will be remembered as the president who "lost" Turkey, Lebanon and Egypt, and during whose tenure America's alliances in the Middle East crumbled.

The superficial circumstances are similar. In both cases, a United States in financial crisis and after failed wars loses global influence under a leftist president whose good intentions are interpreted abroad as expressions of weakness. The results are reflected in the fall of regimes that were dependent on their relationship with Washington for survival, or in a change in their orientation, as with Ankara.

America's general weakness clearly affects its friends. But unlike Carter, who preached human rights even when it hurt allies, Obama sat on the fence and exercised caution. He neither embraced despised leaders nor evangelized for political freedom, for fear of undermining stability.

Obama began his presidency with trips to Turkey, Egypt and Saudi Arabia, and in speeches in Ankara and Cairo tried to forge new ties between the United States and the Muslim world. His message to Muslims was "I am one of you," and he backed it by quoting from the Koran. President Hosni Mubarak did not join him on the stage at Cairo University, and Obama did not mention his host. But he did not imitate his hated predecessor, President George W. Bush, with blunt calls for democracy and freedom.

Obama apparently believed the main problem of the Middle East was the Israeli occupation, and focused his policy on demanding the suspension of construction in the settlements and on the abortive attempt to renew the peace talks. That failure led him to back off from the peace process in favor of concentrating on heading off an Israeli-Iranian war.

Americans debated constantly the question of whether Obama cut his policy to fit the circumstances or aimed at the wrong targets. The absence of human rights issues from U.S. policy vis-a-vis Arab states drew harsh criticism; he was accused of ignoring the zeitgeist and clinging to old, rotten leaders. In the past few months many opinion pieces have appeared in the Western press asserting that the days of Mubarak's regime are numbered and calling on Obama to reach out to the opposition in Egypt. There was a sense that the U.S. foreign policy establishment was shaking off its long-term protege in Cairo, while the administration lagged behind the columnists and commentators.

The administration faced a dilemma. One can guess that Obama himself identified with the demonstrators, not the aging dictator. But a superpower isn't the civil rights movement. If it abandons its allies the moment they flounder, who would trust it tomorrow? That's why Obama rallied to Mubarak's side until Friday, when the force of the protests bested his regime.

The street revolts in Tunisia and Egypt showed that the United States can do very little to save its friends from the wrath of their citizens. Now Obama will come under fire for not getting close to the Egyptian opposition leaders soon enough and not demanding that Mubarak release his opponents from jail. He will be accused of not pushing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hard enough to stop the settlements and thus indirectly quell the rising tides of anger in the Muslim world. But that's a case of 20:20 hindsight. There's no guarantee that the Egyptian or Tunisian masses would have been willing to live in a repressive regime even if construction in Ariel was halted or a few opposition figures were released from jail.

Now Obama will try to hunker down until the winds of revolt die out, and then forge ties with the new leaders in the region. It cannot be assumed that Mubarak's successors will be clones of Iran's leaders, bent on pursuing a radical anti-American policy. Perhaps they will emulate Turkey's prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who navigates among the blocs and superpowers without giving up his country's membership in NATO and its defense ties with the United States. Erdogan obtained a good deal for Turkey, which benefits from political stability and economic growth without being in anyone's pocket. It could work for Egypt, too
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

seafoid

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #51 on: January 31, 2011, 01:15:30 PM »
That article is neoliberal bollocks. The occupation and the settlers ARE a major cause of anger in the ME.
Obama didn't LOSE Egypt. Does he own Ireland? 
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mylestheslasher

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #52 on: January 31, 2011, 01:17:37 PM »
The prof from Suez Canal uni who was on prime Time last week was superb. Unfortunately they cut him off because of time but he had his fingers on the pulse of why this intifada is happening.

9 million young women can't get married because 9 million young men can't afford to support a family because they have not enough in earnings to put food on the table and a roof overhead.

This is a disaster for Israel. Where is Tyrones own with his know nothing neocon analysis when the whole philosophy is being walked into the ground by the brave people of Egypt?

Probably checking his kindergarden globe to see where Egypt is.

My fear for Egypt is that some extremists try to hi jack the rising which can often happen. However, so far it seems to be a popular rising across the whole communities so hopefully it will stay that way and this dictator will scurry of to exile in the US asap.

seafoid

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #53 on: January 31, 2011, 01:31:39 PM »
Tactical deployment of Muslim prayer in nonviolence


http://justworldnews.org/archives/004140.html
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Bogball XV

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #54 on: January 31, 2011, 02:07:11 PM »
The prof from Suez Canal uni who was on prime Time last week was superb. Unfortunately they cut him off because of time but he had his fingers on the pulse of why this intifada is happening.

9 million young women can't get married because 9 million young men can't afford to support a family because they have not enough in earnings to put food on the table and a roof overhead.

This is a disaster for Israel. Where is Tyrones own with his know nothing neocon analysis when the whole philosophy is being walked into the ground by the brave people of Egypt?

Probably checking his kindergarden globe to see where Egypt is.

My fear for Egypt is that some extremists try to hi jack the rising which can often happen. However, so far it seems to be a popular rising across the whole communities so hopefully it will stay that way and this dictator will scurry of to exile in the US asap.
I'd go so far as to say, normally happens.  We'll see, but I'd be surprised if the people get the democracy that all of them think they're getting.  Although, they should be careful about what they wish for, we have had democracy here for a fair while and it hasn't exactly been a success.  Maybe it's time for us all to accept that democracy doesn't actually work!!
That article is neoliberal bollocks. The occupation and the settlers ARE a major cause of anger in the ME.
Obama didn't LOSE Egypt. Does he own Ireland? 
Thought that myself when reading it, surprised that give her dixie would recommend it.

seafoid

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #55 on: January 31, 2011, 02:29:05 PM »
The wonder of Israeli intelligence. The most feared secret service in the WORLD 

http://www.israel-palestinenews.org/2011/01/gideon-levy-egyptian-masses-wont-play.html

"Three or four days ago, Egypt was still in [Israeli] hands. The army of pundits, including our top expert on Egypt, Benjamin Ben-Eliezer, said that "everything is under control," that Cairo is not Tunis and that Mubarak is strong. Ben-Eliezer said that he had spoken on the phone with a senior Egyptian official, and he assured him that there's nothing to worry about. You can count on Fuad and Hosni, both about to become has-beens. "

Don't you love it when you see Fianna Fáil type characteristics replicated out foreign? 
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Tyrones own

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #56 on: January 31, 2011, 05:41:40 PM »
The prof from Suez Canal uni who was on prime Time last week was superb. Unfortunately they cut him off because of time but he had his fingers on the pulse of why this intifada is happening.

9 million young women can't get married because 9 million young men can't afford to support a family because they have not enough in earnings to put food on the table and a roof overhead.

This is a disaster for Israel. Where is Tyrones own with his know nothing neocon analysis when the whole philosophy is being walked into the ground by the brave people of Egypt?

Probably checking his kindergarden globe to see where Egypt is.

My fear for Egypt is that some extremists try to hi jack the rising which can often happen. However, so far it seems to be a popular rising across the whole communities so hopefully it will stay that way and this dictator will scurry of to exile in the US asap.
:D Sure maybe when you graduate to that level you'll know how it's spelt

I'd comment if I could get you boys to make up your minds...all of a sudden brutal
dictators have become a bad thing ::) Sure for a long time now ye were all about them
defending them at every turn.
 Everyone bar you're little band of Soldiers here can see right through you John... any argument is a good argument as long as it can be turned in to a kicking match at the US/Israel oh and also lets not forget, to deflect attention away from the news last week of your much admired Hamas and their being in bed with Israel  :-[  Oops...
« Last Edit: January 31, 2011, 05:43:49 PM by Tyrones own »
Where all think alike, no one thinks very much.
  - Walter Lippmann

give her dixie

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #57 on: January 31, 2011, 07:30:54 PM »
Faux News, take a bow for your knowledge of Geography........





http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=439x310141
next stop, September 10, for number 4......

muppet

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #58 on: January 31, 2011, 07:55:52 PM »
Faux News, take a bow for your knowledge of Geography........





http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=439x310141

If only we could persuade them to bailout the West Bank.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2011, 08:34:53 PM by muppet »
MWWSI 2017

Groucho

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Re: Middle East landscape rapidly changing
« Reply #59 on: January 31, 2011, 08:32:08 PM »
Might be a bit dated...but here's a few of Uncle Sam's "friends".....................

 http://tfclub.tripod.com/list.html

Nothing changes :o
I like to see the fairways more narrow, then everyone would have to play from the rough, not just me