Author Topic: VAR? For or against  (Read 1219 times)

TabClear

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Re: VAR? For or against
« Reply #30 on: June 24, 2019, 01:13:29 PM »
Iíve long been against VAR for a number of reasons.

1. It creates a hierarchy of rules. The decision to award a throw in that leads to the ball being thrown into the box which leads to the handball has just as much impact as the decision to award the handball but one is subject to VAR the other is not.
2. The injustice of non reviewable wrong decisions is increased.
3. It slows down the game dramatically.
4. Iíve seen a few but only a few images of how offside lines need to be adjusted to take account of the angle the camera is at and how lenses work. I assume FIFA have access to adjusted images but Iíd question accuracy of non fixed cameras in this regard. Chelsea v Spurs in the Carabao Cup was a great example of this. Chelseaís non calibrated camera showed Kane to be well offside. Skyís calibrated camera showed he was on.
5. It doesnít seem to have improved decision making or lead to greater consistency. Take Spurs v Man City in CL. Spurs scores but the VAR official thought it was handball who referred it to the on pitch ref who disagreed. If those officials were reversed the goal wouldnít have stood. VAR is being used too widely and is only shifting the point at which people argue with officials decisions.
6. Itís used for subjective decisions including offside.

I have to say that I was originally a fan of VAR coming in on the basis that technology shoudl be used to get the "right" decision whereever possible. However, in practice I would agree with a lot of these points. In my mind VAR only works in sports where there are a) A lot of breaks in play (Cricket/American Football/Tennis) and b) Checks are mainly used for a matter of fact. (Did a ball hit the line?, Was receiver's foot in bounds?, Did ball carry to fielder? etc). As soon as you start bringing in any area of subjectivity or if you have to review decisions well after the play has moved on its a problem.

In soccer Goalline technology has worked well (despite my earlier comment  :P) as it doesnt interfere in the game and just confirms a matter of fact. I would be all for using it for offside in terms of player location (factual) but not for making the call if the forward is interfering with play (subjective). HOwever, as DMK says, at that point you are creating a hierarchy of rules which causes even greater confusion.

Main Street

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Re: VAR? For or against
« Reply #31 on: June 26, 2019, 08:35:11 AM »
One thing that makes VAR look worse than it is,  is the way itís used to support the controversial new interpretation of what is a hand ball penalty. None no more so than last nightís penaly awarded to the Netherlands.The Japan player was hit on the arm at very close range, even in that millisecond of time she had drawn her arm by her side to avoid a possible ball to arm. Nevertheless the penalty was awarded and she was yellow carded to boot. What next, armless players because refs canít be trusted to arbitrate on the spot for better or for worse?

Hound

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Re: VAR? For or against
« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2019, 12:02:34 PM »
One thing that makes VAR look worse than it is,  is the way itís used to support the controversial new interpretation of what is a hand ball penalty. None no more so than last nightís penaly awarded to the Netherlands.The Japan player was hit on the arm at very close range, even in that millisecond of time she had drawn her arm by her side to avoid a possible ball to arm. Nevertheless the penalty was awarded and she was yellow carded to boot. What next, armless players because refs canít be trusted to arbitrate on the spot for better or for worse?
Well it's the rule's fault rather than the ref's.

Although last night had me in two minds. It certainly wasn't on purpose and her hand was by her side. But I think there was every chance that would have been a goal had it not hit the Japan defender on the arm, so I don't think a penalty was unjust in that circumstance. However, I wouldn't give a yellow card for it.

Main Street

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Re: VAR? For or against
« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2019, 06:57:41 PM »
One thing that makes VAR look worse than it is,  is the way itís used to support the controversial new interpretation of what is a hand ball penalty. None no more so than last nightís penaly awarded to the Netherlands.The Japan player was hit on the arm at very close range, even in that millisecond of time she had drawn her arm by her side to avoid a possible ball to arm. Nevertheless the penalty was awarded and she was yellow carded to boot. What next, armless players because refs canít be trusted to arbitrate on the spot for better or for worse?
Well it's the rule's fault rather than the ref's.

Although last night had me in two minds. It certainly wasn't on purpose and her hand was by her side. But I think there was every chance that would have been a goal had it not hit the Japan defender on the arm, so I don't think a penalty was unjust in that circumstance. However, I wouldn't give a yellow card for it.
Of course it's the rule and not the refs.
That was a stonewall non penalty under the old rule, she had positioned her arm into the most natural humanly possible position, her arm was stuck to her body, impressive considering the ball was blasted at her from a meter out.

Strange the ref did not go to VAR for the Dutch handball just before blowing the final whistle, and that Dutch hand was held away from the body, though that's not a requirement these days.