Author Topic: Living in the North, Working in the South  (Read 2482 times)

Hound

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Re: Living in the North, Working in the South
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2019, 02:01:10 PM »
As far as I know, if you’re in the south after midnight you’re classified as tax resident down there.

That's not correct. It changed about 10 or 12 years ago.

To be tax resident in Ireland, you need to be down south for:
- 183 days in the year (calendar year for Irish tax) or
- 280 days in the last two years.

1 day = any part of the day. Even crossing the border for 5 minutes!

So if you do work 5 days a week down south, you'll clearly be tax resident in Ireland.
But (in most cases) it's not possible to be tax resident in two places, so if you are also tax resident in the UK under UK rules, then you need to look at the tiebreaker clause in the Ireland-UK tax treaty.

It says that if you are tax resident in both UK and Ireland under local rules, then you will only be tax resident in the place where you have a permanent home available.

So, most cross border workers will remain just tax resident where they live.

However, if you are an employee you will probably still have PAYE deducted, so will have to claim that back. Or if you're a company, you will have RCT deducted if you are a building contractor.
 

cornerback

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Re: Living in the North, Working in the South
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2019, 02:47:26 PM »
I work in construction- main contractor takes 35% RCT Tax off my invoice and pays to ROI Revenue. I then have to reclaim it.
Speak to your accountant, should only be 20% you are losing.
0% up to date tax compliance
20% substantially up to date
35% poor tax compliance or not registered

redzone

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Re: Living in the North, Working in the South
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2020, 08:40:45 PM »
Any update on this Tony