Author Topic: Running  (Read 135741 times)

ONeill

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Running
« on: June 09, 2009, 09:11:04 PM »
Any runners out there?

I've been running fairly regularly over the last few months (only 1-2 times a week though). I've done a couple of 10ks but try to run 3-4 miles on training runs at fairly leisurely pace (around 6.5mph). I find that my bpm is around 158-160 at comfortable running but can go up to 178 when running uphill or if running anything up to 8.5mph. In order to keep it around 150 bpm which is at the very top end of my supposed optimum (220-age-60%) I'd need to be barely running/fast walking.

What's the best way to get the bpm down? I've heard of interval training but know little about it. At the minute I'm nowhere near breaking the 50min barrier for a 10k with my best at 55m.

Any help welcome.
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Tony Baloney

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Re: Running
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2009, 09:24:27 PM »
Any runners out there?

I've been running fairly regularly over the last few months (only 1-2 times a week though). I've done a couple of 10ks but try to run 3-4 miles on training runs at fairly leisurely pace (around 6.5mph). I find that my bpm is around 158-160 at comfortable running but can go up to 178 when running uphill or if running anything up to 8.5mph. In order to keep it around 150 bpm which is at the very top end of my supposed optimum (220-age-60%) I'd need to be barely running/fast walking.

What's the best way to get the bpm down? I've heard of interval training but know little about it. At the minute I'm nowhere near breaking the 50min barrier for a 10k with my best at 55m.

Any help welcome.
There are so many variables at play when working out your optimal heart rate. As you are using a generic calculation for all people of your age you seem to fall outside the bell curve and can probably run at a faster pace than your calculation is telling.

If I was you I'd go for pace over heart rate - if you can find and maintain a comfortable pace (mph) for the duration of your 10k  then I would ignore the heart rate monitor.

imtommygunn

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Re: Running
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2009, 09:32:16 PM »
As Tony said that's a pretty generic formula. It varies from person to person. There are ways to work out your max heart rate which are considerably more accurate.

http://www.runningforfitness.org/faq/hrmax.php

Look at that - it's a much better way of working it out.

Just going for runs is not the best way to get a 10k time down - it will only get you so far.

Three types of training will get you quicker...
1. Intervals (Reps of x minutes with a break in between with the measure being you should cover the same ground on the first as on the last)
2. Tempo runs (Basically this is fast running however only for a few miles. So at your pace you'd probably want to do ~3 mile in about 26 minutes or so)
3. LSR (Long Slow Runs which for 10ks should be ~70 minutes)

quit yo jibbajabba

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Re: Running
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2009, 09:33:52 PM »
this may also be relevant to my interests;

o'neill, while not actually answering your question, i did a quick google for a 10k training programme; the time to run website has a bit on it for 55min runners to get to sub 50 (the programme seemed a bit complicated, but im not as clever as you) ;)

also, looked at this one; http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_4/138.shtml - maybe useful for beginners like meself;

if i can hijack the thread for a mo'

what is the craic about training at the optimum bpm for weight loss; i just dont get it that by goin relatively easy on eg a cross trainer or treadmill for 20mins, your burnin more fat than if you push it a bit more

imtommygunn

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Re: Running
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2009, 09:39:02 PM »
I've read, though I'm no expert, that a lot of it is related to time so I suppose optimum BPM is to ensure you can exercise for longer.

Apparently for a period of time you'll burn only your "carbs" store and then after a further period of time you'll start burning your fat store.

Slower heart beat = longer training duration = more time in fat burn territory.

Only what I've read but I would reckon it to be true...

Orior

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Re: Running
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2009, 09:42:35 PM »
My advice would be to forget about the science and just go out and enjoy the run. However..

1) Set a target time for half way and try to be quicker on the return.

2) Start noting your times.

3) Vary the runs, and the terrain.

4) Call over to the Cavehill and I'll race you up and over. Dont worry, my neighbour is a paramedic.

5) When you pass any women, hold your belly in, smile and breath easy.... till you get past them.

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leenie

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Re: Running
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2009, 09:48:29 PM »
Any runners out there?



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hardstation

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Re: Running
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2009, 09:51:56 PM »
Fcuk, that's a good day.
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ONeill

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Re: Running
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2009, 09:59:31 PM »
Have to admit that having the heart boyo on made my runs more comfortable. I was busting myself after 3 miles but this way, keeping the rate steady has made it more enjoyable.

Anyway, there's this this Saturday:

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http://www.dromore.info/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=125:dromore-10k-and-5k-fun-run&catid=39:sports&Itemid=91
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delboy

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Re: Running
« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2009, 10:54:15 PM »
Isn't 60 % fat burning territory, aerobic training can go up to about 85 % of max heart rate, above that its seen as anerobic training (although both things occur in tandem truth be told).

If the goal is to get fitter and faster then don't be afraid to push it into the higher % rates.

Like someone else has mentioned, interval training can be very effective at raising fitness, its all great for mixing it up and prevent the running from becoming 'stale'. Another advantage is that it teaches you how to run faster, sounds silly but there is a technique to running fluently at speed, interval training will help you find your own tecnique.

Gnevin

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Re: Running
« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2009, 11:02:56 PM »
Lads I'm able fairly comfortably to run for 30 minutes in the gym covering about 4/5 km and then doing 5/6 on the bike in 15/20 minutes ,however I can't sprint for shite with out being  seriously out of breath . Any idea's why or how to improve this?
Anyway, long story short... is a phrase whose origins are complicated and rambling.

imtommygunn

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Re: Running
« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2009, 11:50:49 PM »
Different kind of fitness... You're hitting 10 minute miles or so there so sprinting is a bit of a step up. Your lung capacity wouldn't be tested running long distances as opposed to sprinting.

To get better at sprinting you'd need to be doing shuttle drills etc I'd have thought. Mix up the training. Do short stuff, intervals etc.

delboy

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Re: Running
« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2009, 12:04:22 AM »
Lads I'm able fairly comfortably to run for 30 minutes in the gym covering about 4/5 km and then doing 5/6 on the bike in 15/20 minutes ,however I can't sprint for shite with out being  seriously out of breath . Any idea's why or how to improve this?

Welcome to the club, if you aren't out of breath after sprinting then you aren't sprinting! There is all sorts of ways of improving sprinting the main one is to simply do more sprints.

gaa.boy

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Re: Running
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2009, 11:27:41 AM »
I have started running 6/7 miles 4 or 5 times a week and wearing a heart rate monitor. My bpm seem to be way above what it should be. For my entire run it seems to be between 160-210. Should I be worried?

ONeill

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Re: Running
« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2009, 12:43:32 PM »
I have started running 6/7 miles 4 or 5 times a week and wearing a heart rate monitor. My bpm seem to be way above what it should be. For my entire run it seems to be between 160-210. Should I be worried?

I'd be the same but going by online advice everyone's max is different.
I wanna have my kicks before the whole shithouse goes up in flames.