Author Topic: Dialect test  (Read 2152 times)

armaghniac

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #60 on: February 18, 2019, 09:05:33 PM »
It doesn't have Brit or Down person as derogatory terms.
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Owen Brannigan

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #61 on: February 19, 2019, 07:40:36 AM »
BTW guddies (not gutties!) to me were always the rubber soled black shoes, were as the sports shoe was always runners

Omagh townies would call the actual runners guddies.

Also a townie is not necessarily a derogatory term and defo not necessarily a lower class person, it could apply to the golfers types also. Basically someone who wasnt into farming or cars, was a bit showy and soft on the football field and called it "Gaelic".
The lower class types would be "skiprats" or "townie scumbags"

.... and alot of Omagh wans would call their Granny "Nan" thats got to be a garrison hangover that one

Definitely gutties - just your spelling was a bit too phonetical.

Townies is a derogatory term in Omagh when used by those living in the surrounding countryside or by core non-Omagh GAA types or the culchies.  It indicated people who were a seen to not have the backbone and core that the culchies had themselves. It's the derision often directed at Omagh ones who played soccer and football or didn't glorify a culchie lifestyle.  Used in school by culchie GAA teachers in directing insult to those who lived in the town or played for the town GAA teams when finding ways not to pick them for school teams. Look for how long it took for Omagh players to breakthrough onto underage and then senior football teams.  Same happened in Dungannon. 

Never heard the term Skiprat ever used in Omagh to describe anyone and rarely heard or hear Nan being used for Granny except with women who think they are too young to be grannies.

Farrandeelin

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #62 on: February 19, 2019, 07:46:13 AM »
Is trainers a Fermanagh term? First time I heard that used for runners was when I met my wife.
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imtommygunn

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #63 on: February 19, 2019, 08:32:32 AM »
No I would use it too. I think even Scottish people use it.

omaghjoe

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #64 on: February 20, 2019, 03:47:43 PM »
BTW guddies (not gutties!) to me were always the rubber soled black shoes, were as the sports shoe was always runners

Omagh townies would call the actual runners guddies.

Also a townie is not necessarily a derogatory term and defo not necessarily a lower class person, it could apply to the golfers types also. Basically someone who wasnt into farming or cars, was a bit showy and soft on the football field and called it "Gaelic".
The lower class types would be "skiprats" or "townie scumbags"

.... and alot of Omagh wans would call their Granny "Nan" thats got to be a garrison hangover that one

Definitely gutties - just your spelling was a bit too phonetical.

Townies is a derogatory term in Omagh when used by those living in the surrounding countryside or by core non-Omagh GAA types or the culchies.  It indicated people who were a seen to not have the backbone and core that the culchies had themselves. It's the derision often directed at Omagh ones who played soccer and football or didn't glorify a culchie lifestyle.  Used in school by culchie GAA teachers in directing insult to those who lived in the town or played for the town GAA teams when finding ways not to pick them for school teams. Look for how long it took for Omagh players to breakthrough onto underage and then senior football teams.  Same happened in Dungannon. 

Never heard the term Skiprat ever used in Omagh to describe anyone and rarely heard or hear Nan being used for Granny except with women who think they are too young to be grannies.

"Didnt glorify a culchie lifestyle"  :D :D :D no bias there ;) Looks like the townies take more insult to "townie" that what is meant aww bless. I'd imagine the Dublin road types dont like being thrown into the same box as Strathroy

Omagh wans were always more into soccer when I was at school and would get picked more often for the school teams as they were usually a bit flashier and talked each other up all the time. The break thru of players is more to do with GAA being taken seriously in schools, the success of the county senior team, and the demise of soccer in the town.
I dont think there was any of them picked for the 97/98 minors despite being at the trials so it wasnt like they didnt get a chance

My spelling was to phonetical  ;D ;D...... Im glad to have rectified that problem.

Skiprat was used all the time often by Omagh wans, not sure on its popularity now

Puckoon

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #65 on: February 20, 2019, 09:18:19 PM »
BTW guddies (not gutties!) to me were always the rubber soled black shoes, were as the sports shoe was always runners

Omagh townies would call the actual runners guddies.

Also a townie is not necessarily a derogatory term and defo not necessarily a lower class person, it could apply to the golfers types also. Basically someone who wasnt into farming or cars, was a bit showy and soft on the football field and called it "Gaelic".
The lower class types would be "skiprats" or "townie scumbags"

.... and alot of Omagh wans would call their Granny "Nan" thats got to be a garrison hangover that one

Definitely gutties - just your spelling was a bit too phonetical.

Townies is a derogatory term in Omagh when used by those living in the surrounding countryside or by core non-Omagh GAA types or the culchies.  It indicated people who were a seen to not have the backbone and core that the culchies had themselves. It's the derision often directed at Omagh ones who played soccer and football or didn't glorify a culchie lifestyle.  Used in school by culchie GAA teachers in directing insult to those who lived in the town or played for the town GAA teams when finding ways not to pick them for school teams. Look for how long it took for Omagh players to breakthrough onto underage and then senior football teams.  Same happened in Dungannon. 

Never heard the term Skiprat ever used in Omagh to describe anyone and rarely heard or hear Nan being used for Granny except with women who think they are too young to be grannies.

Correct on the gutties, and on the townies. One of the stranger things in my youth was being called a Townie by all and sundry in school football and club underage football - only to take the bus to a challenge game for St Enda's against O'Donovan Rossa and proceed to get lambasted as a crowd of sheep shaggin culchies for the duration.

Owen Brannigan

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #66 on: February 20, 2019, 09:58:49 PM »
BTW guddies (not gutties!) to me were always the rubber soled black shoes, were as the sports shoe was always runners

Omagh townies would call the actual runners guddies.

Also a townie is not necessarily a derogatory term and defo not necessarily a lower class person, it could apply to the golfers types also. Basically someone who wasnt into farming or cars, was a bit showy and soft on the football field and called it "Gaelic".
The lower class types would be "skiprats" or "townie scumbags"

.... and alot of Omagh wans would call their Granny "Nan" thats got to be a garrison hangover that one

Definitely gutties - just your spelling was a bit too phonetical.

Townies is a derogatory term in Omagh when used by those living in the surrounding countryside or by core non-Omagh GAA types or the culchies.  It indicated people who were a seen to not have the backbone and core that the culchies had themselves. It's the derision often directed at Omagh ones who played soccer and football or didn't glorify a culchie lifestyle.  Used in school by culchie GAA teachers in directing insult to those who lived in the town or played for the town GAA teams when finding ways not to pick them for school teams. Look for how long it took for Omagh players to breakthrough onto underage and then senior football teams.  Same happened in Dungannon. 

Never heard the term Skiprat ever used in Omagh to describe anyone and rarely heard or hear Nan being used for Granny except with women who think they are too young to be grannies.

Correct on the gutties, and on the townies. One of the stranger things in my youth was being called a Townie by all and sundry in school football and club underage football - only to take the bus to a challenge game for St Enda's against O'Donovan Rossa and proceed to get lambasted as a crowd of sheep shaggin culchies for the duration.

However, the true dialect test for an Omagh townie is when they say 'mines', i.e. 'Who owns this book? It's mines'

omaghjoe

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #67 on: February 20, 2019, 10:12:42 PM »
BTW guddies (not gutties!) to me were always the rubber soled black shoes, were as the sports shoe was always runners

Omagh townies would call the actual runners guddies.

Also a townie is not necessarily a derogatory term and defo not necessarily a lower class person, it could apply to the golfers types also. Basically someone who wasnt into farming or cars, was a bit showy and soft on the football field and called it "Gaelic".
The lower class types would be "skiprats" or "townie scumbags"

.... and alot of Omagh wans would call their Granny "Nan" thats got to be a garrison hangover that one

Definitely gutties - just your spelling was a bit too phonetical.

Townies is a derogatory term in Omagh when used by those living in the surrounding countryside or by core non-Omagh GAA types or the culchies.  It indicated people who were a seen to not have the backbone and core that the culchies had themselves. It's the derision often directed at Omagh ones who played soccer and football or didn't glorify a culchie lifestyle.  Used in school by culchie GAA teachers in directing insult to those who lived in the town or played for the town GAA teams when finding ways not to pick them for school teams. Look for how long it took for Omagh players to breakthrough onto underage and then senior football teams.  Same happened in Dungannon. 

Never heard the term Skiprat ever used in Omagh to describe anyone and rarely heard or hear Nan being used for Granny except with women who think they are too young to be grannies.

Correct on the gutties, and on the townies. One of the stranger things in my youth was being called a Townie by all and sundry in school football and club underage football - only to take the bus to a challenge game for St Enda's against O'Donovan Rossa and proceed to get lambasted as a crowd of sheep shaggin culchies for the duration.

However, the true dialect test for an Omagh townie is when they say 'mines', i.e. 'Who owns this book? It's mines'

No actually its whether you cross the threshold of 50% of "the boys" have the suffix "ie"/"y"

omaghjoe

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #68 on: February 21, 2019, 12:07:54 AM »
Also dont they say "mines" in Newton/Derg?

Or is theirs more of "my-an" / "my-ans"
« Last Edit: February 21, 2019, 12:21:59 AM by omaghjoe »

Owen Brannigan

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #69 on: February 21, 2019, 07:24:47 AM »
Also dont they say "mines" in Newton/Derg?

Or is theirs more of "my-an" / "my-ans"

My-ans

Owen Brannigan

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Re: Dialect test
« Reply #70 on: February 21, 2019, 07:29:29 AM »
Is

wile/while wine (considerably high winds) or the pronunciation of wild as wile/while

an area specific saying?