Author Topic: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report  (Read 5619 times)

From the Bunker

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2019, 12:52:49 PM »
See point 4.

But at least it was a plan. Do you think the current blazers have a vision?
3 and 4 are contradictory


I think the blazers are useless

J. K. Galbraith:“The conventional wisdom”gives way not so much to new ideas as to “the massive onslaught of circumstances with which it cannot contend”.

I would class 6 or 7 in a row by the Dubs as “the massive onslaught of circumstances with which it cannot contend”.

How so? Funding goes to the best ideas with the best chance of success. If a county happens to be better organised than yours, stop whining and become organised.

It is fundamentally not the role of sports administarors to try and influence on the pitch results. Thats the anti sport attitude I referred to.
That's laughable

School in Dublin gets hours with a full time coach every week
A school in e.g. longford gets 6 weeks of coaching per YEAR, probably 60mins per school and probably only with the junior classrooms

Same organisation, different funding grants from HQ

What you are forgetting is that Dublin GAA is more important. There is greater potential to have more people in the capital playing. Longford does not matter.

Baile Brigín 2

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #16 on: February 07, 2019, 12:55:28 PM »
So let Longford apply for thpuse contact hours....

If they do and get rejected, thats one thing. If they havent bothered, boo hoo.

thewobbler

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #17 on: February 07, 2019, 01:10:11 PM »
For what it’s worth, I wish people would shut the f**k up about Dublin getting larger grants.

A quarter of the population live in that county. If they weren’t receiving an exceptional percentage of overall funding spend, it would be wholly unfair on people born in Dublin, and would be detrimental to the GAA’s grassroots policy of “get them involved with their club early, get them involved for life”.

This is NOT a modern GAA problem. This one rolls all the way back to 1884, when the core constructs of the Association were founded upon the well-meaning and identity-building - but fundamentally imbalanced - partition of jurisdictions according to county lines.

It just so happens that Dublin have come across a golden generation of players at the same time that social media has enabled every dimwit across the land to have an opinion, and to drumbeat the populist narrative. The Dublin dominance issue will  fix itself in a couple of year, except the dimwits in 10 years time will then be yelping about how the GAA needs a strong Dublin.


——-

Fundamentally, where the suits need put in order, is this.

1. Core values of community and volunteering need stamped on their foreheads, sent as daily reminders, typed in 10 foot letters at the top of every letter or enail they read. Every decision they make needs to be evaluated against how it improves the Association for communities and volunteers. If it doesn’t help them, don’t proceed..

2. Strategies, annual budgets and forecasts should focus on minimising expenditure, and not maximising revenue. This concept does not rule out large infrastructure projects or a commitment to coaching; as both provide advantages to members. But it should minimise the desire/need/will to collect pits of cash and then decide what to spend it on. The purpose of this organisation should never be to gather money.

——

Hound

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #18 on: February 07, 2019, 01:41:05 PM »

That's laughable

School in Dublin gets hours with a full time coach every week
A school in e.g. longford gets 6 weeks of coaching per YEAR, probably 60mins per school and probably only with the junior classrooms

Same organisation, different funding grants from HQ

It's actually the same funding grants, but because of numbers there's a lot more of them.
 
The way it works is:
1. Club goes to members and asks are they willing to put €14k (I think that's approx, but not sure) of clubs funds to hiring young full time coach. Members agree and GAA then covers the other 50% of the cost of coach.
2. Coach goes to local schools and takes PE. Equal time has to be given to boys and girls and football and hurling/camogie. Some will throw in handball sessions too I believe.
3. Each child will get one session per week in the primary school (although I didn't think it was the whole year, I thought it was semester, although must check with my kids to confirm) and is encouraged to go up to the club to get more sessions. In most clubs the paid coach will often take the U8s and below for a session at the weekend. But once they're on a team, then it's the parents who take over.

I know there are more and more paid coaches in Leinster, but understand given the numbers there's far less clubs who can raise the 14k themselves, so a few clubs may join forces together to get the funds. Which means the coach is spread over a bigger number of schools. Although the coach in my club has 4 national schools in his catchment, but (unlike a coach in Leinster) there'd only be a few miles between the 4 of them.

caprea

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #19 on: February 07, 2019, 01:45:01 PM »
You’re failing to grasp 3 things:

1- that Dublin have the biggest access to commercial revenue hence they already have revenue streams no other county comes close to so shouldn’t need massive cash injections from HQ

2- Cork the second biggest county is not even getting 10% of the development grants Dublin have over the past 13 years.

3- Dublin have received the most development every year for at least the last 13 years. That is arguably straight up financial doping to an already very successful county.

From the Bunker

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2019, 01:46:08 PM »
For what it’s worth, I wish people would shut the f**k up about Dublin getting larger grants.

A quarter of the population live in that county. If they weren’t receiving an exceptional percentage of overall funding spend, it would be wholly unfair on people born in Dublin, and would be detrimental to the GAA’s grassroots policy of “get them involved with their club early, get them involved for life”.

This is NOT a modern GAA problem. This one rolls all the way back to 1884, when the core constructs of the Association were founded upon the well-meaning and identity-building - but fundamentally imbalanced - partition of jurisdictions according to county lines.

It just so happens that Dublin have come across a golden generation of players at the same time that social media has enabled every dimwit across the land to have an opinion, and to drumbeat the populist narrative. The Dublin dominance issue will  fix itself in a couple of year, except the dimwits in 10 years time will then be yelping about how the GAA needs a strong Dublin.


——-

Fundamentally, where the suits need put in order, is this.

1. Core values of community and volunteering need stamped on their foreheads, sent as daily reminders, typed in 10 foot letters at the top of every letter or enail they read. Every decision they make needs to be evaluated against how it improves the Association for communities and volunteers. If it doesn’t help them, don’t proceed..

2. Strategies, annual budgets and forecasts should focus on minimising expenditure, and not maximising revenue. This concept does not rule out large infrastructure projects or a commitment to coaching; as both provide advantages to members. But it should minimise the desire/need/will to collect pits of cash and then decide what to spend it on. The purpose of this organisation should never be to gather money.

——

 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Baile Brigín 2

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #21 on: February 07, 2019, 01:47:40 PM »
You’re failing to grasp 3 things:

1- that Dublin have the biggest access to commercial revenue hence they already have revenue streams no other county comes close to so shouldn’t need massive cash injections from HQ

2- Cork the second biggest county is not even getting 10% of the development grants Dublin have over the past 13 years.

3- Dublin have received the most development every year for at least the last 13 years. That is arguably straight up financial doping to an already very successful county.

Cork and funding is unfortunate at the moment.

But all these counties getting too little. Are they having requests rejected?

highorlow

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #22 on: February 07, 2019, 01:57:50 PM »
Quote
It just so happens that Dublin have come across a golden generations of players at the same time that social media has enabled every dimwit across the land culchie to have an opinion

Fixed that for ya!  ;)

inabsentia

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2019, 02:30:28 PM »
You’re failing to grasp 3 things:

1- that Dublin have the biggest access to commercial revenue hence they already have revenue streams no other county comes close to so shouldn’t need massive cash injections from HQ

2- Cork the second biggest county is not even getting 10% of the development grants Dublin have over the past 13 years.

3- Dublin have received the most development every year for at least the last 13 years. That is arguably straight up financial doping to an already very successful county.

By what metric are you defining Cork as the second largest county?

From the Bunker

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2019, 02:33:07 PM »
So let's have your suggestions on what they should do.

1. Complete cleanout on Jones Road. Too many chefs, too many committees too many tinkerings to justify their existence. In general, leave it alone

2. Accountability. The people who brought us the puc debacle have been rewarded. The GAA press need to be critical and risk the trough.

3. Stop this anti sport attitude. Dublin and Kilkenny are where they are because of good decisions and graft. Handicapping them is not the approach, pull up your own socks.

4. That said the imbalance in funding is crazy. Back ambition wherever it is.

5. Infrastructure is all over the place. PuC, Casement, Tallaght. Disasters following no pattern.

.

I think the Dubs are a different kettle of fish to KK
The GAA didn't decide to fund KK systematically to the detriment of everyone else

The Dubs were a bit of joke between 1996 and 2008 say

https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/gaelic-football/fault-lines-appear-for-kerry-in-a-kingdom-under-pressure-1.3769567

 "Dublin’s transformation from 1970s nostalgia act to unprecedented juggernaut has forced Kerry football people – all Kerry people, in other words – to think differently about themselves. The old certainties have been stripped away with bewildering haste."

Not long ago you were saying the opposite seafoid! I suppose now that you have seen the Dubs up close against Galway you now realise the true nature of this animal. Talk of cycles has vanished?

BennyCake

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #25 on: February 07, 2019, 02:35:29 PM »
You’re failing to grasp 3 things:

1- that Dublin have the biggest access to commercial revenue hence they already have revenue streams no other county comes close to so shouldn’t need massive cash injections from HQ

2- Cork the second biggest county is not even getting 10% of the development grants Dublin have over the past 13 years.

3- Dublin have received the most development every year for at least the last 13 years. That is arguably straight up financial doping to an already very successful county.

By what metric are you defining Cork as the second largest county?

Antrim is the second most populated county.

Rossfan

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #26 on: February 07, 2019, 02:38:26 PM »
I love Hound's bit about asking Club members to put €14k of Clubs funds towards paying a coach......
That rules out about 90% of Clubs in most Counties.
1 BIG CUP and 1 Cupeen so far....

From the Bunker

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #27 on: February 07, 2019, 02:44:52 PM »
I love Hound's bit about asking Club members to put €14k of Clubs funds towards paying a coach......
That rules out about 90% of Clubs in most Counties.

It's his "Qu'ils mangent de la brioche" moment!

manfromdelmonte

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #28 on: February 07, 2019, 04:05:29 PM »
I know of 3 clubs in the midlands who were willing to 50% fund a full time coach, shared between the 3 clubs.
They had a club coaching plan, funding plan, and school coaching plan all in place and they went looking for matching funding
No matching funding available at county or provincial level.

Another midlands county drew up an urban development plan to try and develop GAA in the towns and went looking for funding.
No funding available

There won't be too many golden generations appearing outside of Dublin, out of the blue.

Hound

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #29 on: February 07, 2019, 05:03:24 PM »
I know of 3 clubs in the midlands who were willing to 50% fund a full time coach, shared between the 3 clubs.
They had a club coaching plan, funding plan, and school coaching plan all in place and they went looking for matching funding
No matching funding available at county or provincial level.

That's shocking if true.
Goes against all information given by the GAA in relation to such funding.
Let's find out if it is true.

Start by the naming the clubs involved and we'll go from there.