Author Topic: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report  (Read 5788 times)

Owenmoresider

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #105 on: May 09, 2019, 11:26:32 AM »
Nobody is watching Div 3 or 4 teams at the minute. A tiered championship won't make a difference with coverage, but at least we won't get as many one sided games. Watch this weekend to see how many rubbish, one sided, shite games there are.
True, but Carlow got a bit of exposure by causing an upset in the current competition which also raised excitement in the county.

The question I'd ask is, would the players/management/supporters of Carlow prefer that bit of a run/chance of a bit of a run, or would they prefer to compete and have a better chance of winning a B/C competition.
That's the thing, two years ago Carlow footballers made life difficult for Dublin for 50-55 minutes before falling away, and then gave Monaghan a proper game with only a late goal seeing Monaghan home. The same year their hurlers won the Christy Ring Cup with an impressive defeat of Antrim. Which team's feats grabbed the Carlow public's attention more?

seafoid

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #106 on: May 09, 2019, 12:03:22 PM »
Maybe they should ask the fans who don't go to matches any more
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seafoid

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #107 on: July 21, 2019, 01:47:54 PM »
Attendances are the metric to watch

Plus TV viewing stats
Sport without competition is a very hard thing to sell
Maybe this year only one match will be of general interest
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seafoid

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #108 on: July 23, 2019, 09:09:46 AM »



https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/gaelic-football/kevin-mcstay-no-solution-in-sight-to-countering-dublin-s-dominance-1.3963983

"*The ironic thing is that if Dublin hadnít made this metamorphosis into such a frighteningly strong commercial and athletic force this would be heralded as a golden age for the game. Kerry and Donegal played All-Ireland-winning calibre football in a classic on Sunday. Tyrone are lurking. Mayo are amassing for one of their heroic last stands.
If Dublin were just extremely good rather than this omnipotent force, then this yearís All-Ireland would be wonderful.
Instead a vague sense of hopelessness is hanging over the thing. The last time I felt like this was when I was an emerging player in the early 1980s and it was all about Dublin and Kerry. We were just waiting for Kerry to get old and go away Ė and that took a long time.

*I donít have any sense that Dublin are ever going away again. It points to very difficult times for every other county in Ireland for many years to come. And the solution is not at all obvious.

*Dublin are on a par with Kerry in terms of attacking movement. They empty out pockets, go on dummy runs. They will make 50-metre runs just to get a short kickout Ė and often wonít get the ball at all. Sooner or later the tracker gets tired and switches off, and then the openings come. After that, as happened to Roscommon, the floodgates open.

*sooner or later Dublin will identify an excellent replacement candidate and will bring through complete players that we havenít heard of.
Brian Howard and Eoin Murchan just came into the senior team as the fully achieved thing. It seemed like these guys walked in off the street but, of course, they didnít. And there are many more like them waiting in the wings."
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seafoid

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #109 on: August 13, 2019, 09:28:03 AM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/gaelic-football/kevin-mcstay-no-hiding-from-mayo-s-many-mistakes-against-dublin-1.3984163


The more I look at these big games, one measurement jumps out at me increasingly: the attacks-to-shots-to-scores measurement. In many ways, the modern metric revolves around accuracy: how many of your shots are flying over the bar? We saw it with Tyrone on Sunday: when the shots stop going over the bar, things grind to a halt. But interestingly, Dublin had 37 attacks. Mayo had 34. Then you drill further down down: Dublin got 26 shots away and Mayo got 24 shots. Again, no great disparity. But of those totals, Dublin were successful with 17 and Mayo just 11. It was 65 per cent against 46 per cent in terms of accuracy. And 65 is quite low by Dublin standards: they are often in the high 70s or low 80s.
I was interested in their game management after Lee Keeganís goal. I noticed that they there was a signal given and they went into a hand-passing drill back and forth to take the sting out of the game after that score.

Any bit of rebellion that Mayo may have had was drained out by this couple of minutes of patient recycling. This was only the 52nd minute. The 12 points in 12 minutes is over: they have the game won and they can control the tempo and just see it out. They were not about to get sucked into one of those helter-skelter closing finishes with which Mayo nearly caught them before"
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Taylor

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #110 on: August 13, 2019, 09:54:51 AM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/gaelic-football/kevin-mcstay-no-hiding-from-mayo-s-many-mistakes-against-dublin-1.3984163


The more I look at these big games, one measurement jumps out at me increasingly: the attacks-to-shots-to-scores measurement. In many ways, the modern metric revolves around accuracy: how many of your shots are flying over the bar? We saw it with Tyrone on Sunday: when the shots stop going over the bar, things grind to a halt. But interestingly, Dublin had 37 attacks. Mayo had 34. Then you drill further down down: Dublin got 26 shots away and Mayo got 24 shots. Again, no great disparity. But of those totals, Dublin were successful with 17 and Mayo just 11. It was 65 per cent against 46 per cent in terms of accuracy. And 65 is quite low by Dublin standards: they are often in the high 70s or low 80s.
I was interested in their game management after Lee Keeganís goal. I noticed that they there was a signal given and they went into a hand-passing drill back and forth to take the sting out of the game after that score.

Any bit of rebellion that Mayo may have had was drained out by this couple of minutes of patient recycling. This was only the 52nd minute. The 12 points in 12 minutes is over: they have the game won and they can control the tempo and just see it out. They were not about to get sucked into one of those helter-skelter closing finishes with which Mayo nearly caught them before"

Was that the time when the Dublin defence had the ball and an arm/fist was raised? This was replicated by someone else out the field

shark

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #111 on: August 13, 2019, 10:27:23 AM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/gaelic-football/kevin-mcstay-no-hiding-from-mayo-s-many-mistakes-against-dublin-1.3984163


The more I look at these big games, one measurement jumps out at me increasingly: the attacks-to-shots-to-scores measurement. In many ways, the modern metric revolves around accuracy: how many of your shots are flying over the bar? We saw it with Tyrone on Sunday: when the shots stop going over the bar, things grind to a halt. But interestingly, Dublin had 37 attacks. Mayo had 34. Then you drill further down down: Dublin got 26 shots away and Mayo got 24 shots. Again, no great disparity. But of those totals, Dublin were successful with 17 and Mayo just 11. It was 65 per cent against 46 per cent in terms of accuracy. And 65 is quite low by Dublin standards: they are often in the high 70s or low 80s.
I was interested in their game management after Lee Keeganís goal. I noticed that they there was a signal given and they went into a hand-passing drill back and forth to take the sting out of the game after that score.

Any bit of rebellion that Mayo may have had was drained out by this couple of minutes of patient recycling. This was only the 52nd minute. The 12 points in 12 minutes is over: they have the game won and they can control the tempo and just see it out. They were not about to get sucked into one of those helter-skelter closing finishes with which Mayo nearly caught them before"

Was that the time when the Dublin defence had the ball and an arm/fist was raised? This was replicated by someone else out the field

Yeah it was Cooper. I wondered about that at the time.

Taylor

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Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« Reply #112 on: August 13, 2019, 10:32:31 AM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/gaelic-football/kevin-mcstay-no-hiding-from-mayo-s-many-mistakes-against-dublin-1.3984163


The more I look at these big games, one measurement jumps out at me increasingly: the attacks-to-shots-to-scores measurement. In many ways, the modern metric revolves around accuracy: how many of your shots are flying over the bar? We saw it with Tyrone on Sunday: when the shots stop going over the bar, things grind to a halt. But interestingly, Dublin had 37 attacks. Mayo had 34. Then you drill further down down: Dublin got 26 shots away and Mayo got 24 shots. Again, no great disparity. But of those totals, Dublin were successful with 17 and Mayo just 11. It was 65 per cent against 46 per cent in terms of accuracy. And 65 is quite low by Dublin standards: they are often in the high 70s or low 80s.
I was interested in their game management after Lee Keeganís goal. I noticed that they there was a signal given and they went into a hand-passing drill back and forth to take the sting out of the game after that score.

Any bit of rebellion that Mayo may have had was drained out by this couple of minutes of patient recycling. This was only the 52nd minute. The 12 points in 12 minutes is over: they have the game won and they can control the tempo and just see it out. They were not about to get sucked into one of those helter-skelter closing finishes with which Mayo nearly caught them before"

Was that the time when the Dublin defence had the ball and an arm/fist was raised? This was replicated by someone else out the field

Yeah it was Cooper. I wondered about that at the time.

Was just surprised they made the signal so 'evident' that everyone could see what they were at