Author Topic: Bio-banding  (Read 694 times)

Sportacus

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Bio-banding
« on: September 05, 2018, 10:12:55 PM »
Interesting debate on RTE Radio today where a sports scientist was promoting the benefits of 'bio-banding', where kids are banded based on their physical maturity rather than age.  It's been adopted by the Premier League for several underage tournaments.  The feedback was good from the kids, with the physically bigger ones having to raise their game technically because they couldn't just boss it physically.  And the smaller kids confidence grew because they weren't being pushed aside.

Is this worth a look in gaelic?  In U12 and U14 there can be a massive difference between the smallest and biggest on the pitch and that doesn't help either kid.

The researcher was Dr Sean Cumming, Bath University, if you want to read more.

Dinny Breen

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Re: Bio-banding
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2018, 10:16:00 PM »
#newbridgeornowhere

brokencrossbar1

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Re: Bio-banding
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2018, 10:34:28 PM »
Very interesting viewpoint. I would love to see what the actual drop off rates are over a significant period of time. It does make more sense so long as there is still an element of age grading. Striking a balance would be difficult. The one thing I would say Dinny is that the physical nature of rugby is at a different level to other ball games. It’s a tough one to fall either side

grounded

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Re: Bio-banding
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2018, 11:37:16 AM »
Interesting debate on RTE Radio today where a sports scientist was promoting the benefits of 'bio-banding', where kids are banded based on their physical maturity rather than age.  It's been adopted by the Premier League for several underage tournaments.  The feedback was good from the kids, with the physically bigger ones having to raise their game technically because they couldn't just boss it physically.  And the smaller kids confidence grew because they weren't being pushed aside.

Is this worth a look in gaelic?  In U12 and U14 there can be a massive difference between the smallest and biggest on the pitch and that doesn't help either kid.

The researcher was Dr Sean Cumming, Bath University, if you want to read more.

I'm not sure it's feasible in gaelic. In our own rural club we have a job fielding a team never mind ruling kids out because of their size. In a way it sort of pans out itself without any interference. In that the more mature players quite often play in a higher age grade anyway. Eventually most of the other kids catch up anyway as they get older.
                There has to be grading somewhere in order for teams to compete. I guess age is the easiest way.   
               Funny this conversation reminds me a little of the ending to the first 'incredible s movie ' were the father was encouraging his incredibly fast child to run fast, but not fast enough to beat the other kids!
« Last Edit: September 06, 2018, 11:42:21 AM by grounded »

Baile Brigín 2

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Re: Bio-banding
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2018, 11:43:53 AM »
Interesting debate on RTE Radio today where a sports scientist was promoting the benefits of 'bio-banding', where kids are banded based on their physical maturity rather than age.  It's been adopted by the Premier League for several underage tournaments.  The feedback was good from the kids, with the physically bigger ones having to raise their game technically because they couldn't just boss it physically.  And the smaller kids confidence grew because they weren't being pushed aside.

Is this worth a look in gaelic?  In U12 and U14 there can be a massive difference between the smallest and biggest on the pitch and that doesn't help either kid.

The researcher was Dr Sean Cumming, Bath University, if you want to read more.

I'm not sure it's feasible in gaelic. In our own rural club we have a job fielding a team never mind ruling kids out because of their size. In a way it sort of pans out itself without any interference. In that the more mature players quite often play in a higher age grade anyway. Eventually most of the other kids catch up anyway as they get older.
                There has to be grading somewhere in order for teams to compete. I guess age is the easiest way.   
               Funny this conversation reminds me a little of the ending to the first 'incredible s movie ' were the father was encouraging his incredibly fast child to run fast, but not fast enough to beat the other kids!
You arent ruling kids out.

Take the u12 and u13 teams for example, dont split them by age, split them by weight/height.

Hound

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Re: Bio-banding
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2018, 12:40:19 PM »
Interesting debate on RTE Radio today where a sports scientist was promoting the benefits of 'bio-banding', where kids are banded based on their physical maturity rather than age.  It's been adopted by the Premier League for several underage tournaments.  The feedback was good from the kids, with the physically bigger ones having to raise their game technically because they couldn't just boss it physically.  And the smaller kids confidence grew because they weren't being pushed aside.

Is this worth a look in gaelic?  In U12 and U14 there can be a massive difference between the smallest and biggest on the pitch and that doesn't help either kid.

The researcher was Dr Sean Cumming, Bath University, if you want to read more.

I'm not sure it's feasible in gaelic. In our own rural club we have a job fielding a team never mind ruling kids out because of their size. In a way it sort of pans out itself without any interference. In that the more mature players quite often play in a higher age grade anyway. Eventually most of the other kids catch up anyway as they get older.
                There has to be grading somewhere in order for teams to compete. I guess age is the easiest way.   
               Funny this conversation reminds me a little of the ending to the first 'incredible s movie ' were the father was encouraging his incredibly fast child to run fast, but not fast enough to beat the other kids!
You arent ruling kids out.

Take the u12 and u13 teams for example, dont split them by age, split them by weight/height.
In my opinion, that might sound like a good idea in theory, but from my experience it would be a load of nonsense.

Most of the tall and/or heavy youngsters aren't actually that good. Putting them up a level would be awful for them. Yes, the odd good big lad is capable of destroying games, but that's because they are both strong and skillful. It's up to the playing rules (and GoGames is a good start) and the managers (not having a win-at-all-cost attitude) to fix this.

Even if you just have little lads playing together, there'll still be some lads running rings around the others.

Age is the fairest way IMO.

johnnycool

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Re: Bio-banding
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2018, 12:51:19 PM »
Interesting debate on RTE Radio today where a sports scientist was promoting the benefits of 'bio-banding', where kids are banded based on their physical maturity rather than age.  It's been adopted by the Premier League for several underage tournaments.  The feedback was good from the kids, with the physically bigger ones having to raise their game technically because they couldn't just boss it physically.  And the smaller kids confidence grew because they weren't being pushed aside.

Is this worth a look in gaelic?  In U12 and U14 there can be a massive difference between the smallest and biggest on the pitch and that doesn't help either kid.

The researcher was Dr Sean Cumming, Bath University, if you want to read more.

I'm not sure it's feasible in gaelic. In our own rural club we have a job fielding a team never mind ruling kids out because of their size. In a way it sort of pans out itself without any interference. In that the more mature players quite often play in a higher age grade anyway. Eventually most of the other kids catch up anyway as they get older.
                There has to be grading somewhere in order for teams to compete. I guess age is the easiest way.   
               Funny this conversation reminds me a little of the ending to the first 'incredible s movie ' were the father was encouraging his incredibly fast child to run fast, but not fast enough to beat the other kids!
You arent ruling kids out.

Take the u12 and u13 teams for example, dont split them by age, split them by weight/height.

Most rural clubs don't split u12 and u13 as they probably need 11 to 13 year olds to make a team.




grounded

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Re: Bio-banding
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2018, 12:53:46 PM »
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/news/article.cfm?c_id=4&objectid=12086437   

The other side...
[/quote

Now that is fascinating. Having the child strip down so he could register under the qualifying weight says it all really.
     Sad.

grounded

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Re: Bio-banding
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2018, 01:07:31 PM »
Interesting debate on RTE Radio today where a sports scientist was promoting the benefits of 'bio-banding', where kids are banded based on their physical maturity rather than age.  It's been adopted by the Premier League for several underage tournaments.  The feedback was good from the kids, with the physically bigger ones having to raise their game technically because they couldn't just boss it physically.  And the smaller kids confidence grew because they weren't being pushed aside.

Is this worth a look in gaelic?  In U12 and U14 there can be a massive difference between the smallest and biggest on the pitch and that doesn't help either kid.

The researcher was Dr Sean Cumming, Bath University, if you want to read more.

I'm not sure it's feasible in gaelic. In our own rural club we have a job fielding a team never mind ruling kids out because of their size. In a way it sort of pans out itself without any interference. In that the more mature players quite often play in a higher age grade anyway. Eventually most of the other kids catch up anyway as they get older.
                There has to be grading somewhere in order for teams to compete. I guess age is the easiest way.   
               Funny this conversation reminds me a little of the ending to the first 'incredible s movie ' were the father was encouraging his incredibly fast child to run fast, but not fast enough to beat the other kids!
You arent ruling kids out.

Take the u12 and u13 teams for example, dont split them by age, split them by weight/height.

Most rural clubs don't split u12 and u13 as they probably need 11 to 13 year olds to make a team.

Exactly. Some of the older age groups we cant field at all some years. We have to merge with other local clubs in order for the kids to get a competitive game.