Author Topic: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.  (Read 158387 times)

Hereiam

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2685 on: August 19, 2019, 08:30:44 PM »
https://www.esri.ie/system/files/publications/OPEA173.pdf

"There is not an extensive literature on the performance of the NI economy, especially in the more recent period since the Good Friday Agreement; or how integrated the NI economy is with other GB regions or with the RoI economy. During the 1960s, the performance of the NI economy was relatively impressive with industrial production growing faster than the wider UK (Rowthorn, 1981). However, the 1970s saw a reversal of this trend, with the period being characterised by a rapid decline in the manufacturing base, very limited FDI and a rapid expansion in the services sector, predominately in the public sector (Rowthorn, 1981). In NI, employment in manufacturing and industrial production fell over the course of the 1970s, with the biggest losses in textiles, mechanical engineering and clothing and footwear (Rowthorn, 1981). This performance was much worse than the wider UK and contrasts with the experience of RoI where manufacturing and industrial employment expanded rapidly over the course of the decade (Rowthorn, 1981). Very few jobs were created by foreign multinationals investing in NI, which has largely been attributed to the Troubles (Bradley, 1996). Public sector employment expanded by 52% over the course of the 1970s, compared to just 22% in the UK as a whole, and while employment in police and prison services grew rapidly; there was also substantial increases in employment in health and education (Rowthorn, 1981). This reshaped the employment structure of the NI economy, so that by the early 1980s almost 40% of employment in NI was in the public sector (Teague, 2016). This expansion in public sector employment was facilitated by a large increase in the subvention to NI from the UK government, which helped in part to alleviate the impact of deindustrialisation; yet the underlying labour market prospects were poor (outside of the public sector) and the unemployment rate reached 20% in the early 1980s (Teague, 2016).
Michie and Sheehan (1998) investigated the extent to which the NI economy relates to that of GB and RoI by examining cointegration between the growth rates of NI, GB and RoI. Their findings lead the authors to conclude that the NI economy is in a ‘somewhat anomalous’ position as it was neither cointegrated with RoI nor with GB and also, at a regional level, not integrated with other parts in the UK. McGuinness and Sheehan (1998) examine the extent of regional convergence in the UK over the period 1970 to 1995. They show that despite growth in overall UK GDP per capita over the time period that that the ordering of regions’ share of GDP per capita practically remained constant, with NI and Wales consistently having the lowest per capita income. Moreover, they find some limited evidence of regional convergence in the UK and little evidence that NI was closely integrated with GB regional economies.1 Finally, there has been limited analysis of the hoped for ‘peace dividend’ following the signing of the Belfast Agreement. Teague (2016) concludes that the broad economic structure of the NI economy remains very similar to that of twenty years ago and is still heavily dependent on UK subvention with the public sector remaining the driver of the local economy"

That is not a healthy way to exist. People are deluded if they want this place to remain as it is, we need to get away from the shackles of Westminster

ned

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2686 on: August 19, 2019, 09:40:24 PM »
So a United Ireland is to be decided by anti biotics and prescriptions :o

Similar issues swung the Scottish referendum a few years ago.

How?

BennyCake

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2687 on: August 19, 2019, 10:55:59 PM »
So a United Ireland is to be decided by anti biotics and prescriptions :o

Similar issues swung the Scottish referendum a few years ago.

How?

Fears over pensions and such like.

Rossfan

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2688 on: August 19, 2019, 11:38:03 PM »
Pensions were a red herring scare tactic to frighten the older voters.
Didn't pensioners in the 26 get paid after the Free State was set up?
And no doubt Czechs and Slovaks did after they went their separate ways.
Those Scots paid into the system for 40/50 years so their pensions would be sorted out in the Transitional arrangements.
I'm still wondering why prescribing anti biotics for viruses will derail a UI though :o
1 BIG CUP and 1 Cupeen so far....

seafoid

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2689 on: August 20, 2019, 08:50:13 AM »
Pensions were a red herring scare tactic to frighten the older voters.
Didn't pensioners in the 26 get paid after the Free State was set up?
And no doubt Czechs and Slovaks did after they went their separate ways.
Those Scots paid into the system for 40/50 years so their pensions would be sorted out in the Transitional arrangements.
I'm still wondering why prescribing anti biotics for viruses will derail a UI though :o

Everyone in the BMW region and NI should read this document

https://www.esri.ie/system/files/publications/OPEA173.pdf

There is a very interesting chart in page 6

Munster and Leinster GDP per head is about twice that of NI and Border, Midlands,  West
 
Table 1: Per capita GDP in US dollars, constant 2010 prices, constant PPP 2000 2014

RoI: Southern & Eastern        42,979 55,991
UK: Northern Ireland             26,217 28,159
RoI: Border, Midlands West    25,931 27,369

The reason is the multinational export sector.

 
Lookit

Chicago Hurling

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Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« Reply #2690 on: August 20, 2019, 12:11:52 PM »
Pensions were a red herring scare tactic to frighten the older voters.
Didn't pensioners in the 26 get paid after the Free State was set up?
And no doubt Czechs and Slovaks did after they went their separate ways.
Those Scots paid into the system for 40/50 years so their pensions would be sorted out in the Transitional arrangements.
I'm still wondering why prescribing anti biotics for viruses will derail a UI though :o

Everyone in the BMW region and NI should read this document

https://www.esri.ie/system/files/publications/OPEA173.pdf

There is a very interesting chart in page 6

Munster and Leinster GDP per head is about twice that of NI and Border, Midlands,  West
 
Table 1: Per capita GDP in US dollars, constant 2010 prices, constant PPP 2000 2014

RoI: Southern & Eastern        42,979 55,991
UK: Northern Ireland             26,217 28,159
RoI: Border, Midlands West    25,931 27,369

The reason is the multinational export sector.

 

Would that change if NI were to join the ROI? How many companies that are located in Cork or Galway might look to Belfast or Derry for a larger talent pool now that they can get the same tax concessions? It happens in other countries all the time.
Chicago -> Milwaukee -> Galway

Mayo for Sam