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Messages - Lar Naparka

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1
GAA Discussion / Re: NFL Division 1 2019 Dubs again?
« on: February 16, 2019, 09:24:54 PM »
The Dubs will never understand the logistics in getting U20 players home from college to train and senior panellists home who go to college and work in Dublin

and the costs involved.

This thread started out ostensibly as the place at which the 2019 NFL Division 1 might be discussed - and with this being the most open Div. 1 for a number of years you’d think there’d be plenty to discuss. But surprise, surprise like so many threads on this board begrudgery takes over.

Remember lads Dublin are sitting in sixth position in Division 1. Surely that alone should encourage more positive discussion and less of the “poor us” whinging.
I agree with you - on this one at any rate. I generally don't go in for moaning either. I don't blame the Dubs for being so far in front of every other team in the and. You will recall that I once said turkeys can't be expected to vote for Christmas or something along those lines.
If dudes from other counties object, the people to get onto are their own county boards and find out why they are prepared to be pushed aside without a whimper.
There are a good few Dublin heads who need a reality check also. Some keep on asking the same f***ing questions over and over.
 Take yer man Jell O Biafra for example. I mentioned the figures involved if Dublin was to be split in four- along modern county lines. So he comes back with something like where was my concern for players who were denied  chance to play at intercounty level when Dublin wasn't winning all around them?
What the  feck has that got to do with what I wrote?
I didn't express my opinion, neither good nor bad. Anyone could use the same basic arithmetic and would have to come to the same conclusion as I did.
I'm not mad or anything like that but I am confused. It seems a good few Dublin heads didn't learn English as their first language and that for once is my personal opinion.
They don't have a total monopoly on stupidity on here either but that's irrelevant also. ;D

2
All this concern for Dublin players who drop out because of sheer numbers is very touching.  Not sure how I managed to miss it all back when we weren't  winning.
Never heard of The Blue Wave initiative or the fact that Dublin gets enough of the coaching development kitty that could pay the wages of a dictator in yer average banana republic?

3
GAA Discussion / Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« on: February 16, 2019, 10:34:36 AM »

why aren't the teachers doing PE?
they are paid to teach it
Agreed!

The still get PE off the teachers mostly, but the teacher gets a free class when the GAA lad arrives for a session for their class.

My kids went to the very same school I did and the standard of PE I got was miles better.

Often 30 kids standing around in a hall waiting minutes for a ball to be thrown to you! Or a small beanbag so everyone had a good chance of making a catch!
You need to ask their school why the PE is crap
Our local school has no hall or pitch yet the teachers get them out at least once a week
Officially, PE is a recognised subject on the school curriculum. So each school class is supposed to devote a fixed section of the class timetable to the subject. Each teacher is expected to have a Plean Scoile or school (work) plan for each week.
By the way, devoting the whole time to Gah coaching every week wouldn't rate as a balanced PE program!
Arrangements can be made to bring in specialist coaches for PE ( bit of a joke at times) where those employed  used to be FAS employees. The only time I was persuaded to get outsiders in to lessen my load, I got saddled with two gum-chewing young wans who hadn't a clue about anything to do with sport of any sort. They also called kids by their last names which didn't go down well with my lot. So the first visit was also the last.
Okay, so I have a biased view of what outside help officially means. Schools can also make plans with GAA coaches from local clubs or whatever to come in for coaching sessions. That should, officially at least, be outside of school hours but like so many other aspects of teaching, teachers can have a lot of leeway here and I know of cases where schools and clubs pick the times best suited for both and that can involved the last part of the school day.
Farr may be able to say if there has been any recent updates to this policy but I think I would have heard of it if there was any in Dublin.
One further note, I dunno where the sums allegedly spent of coaching development in Dublin is going but it sure ain't being spent on primary school kids and that's for sure.


4
4 County Boards and a Provincial Council would require an awful lot of Committees ;D
Don't mind the committees, what about the addition of another four county panels if the GAA followed its own rules and split Dublin in four?
Back in 1884, the county was used as the basis for the present intercounty model. After all, they were used for local government purpose and it was a logical progression to establish 32 county boards and take it from there. In recent years, Dublin was split into four administration units, aka, counties i.e. Dunlaoire/Rathdown, Fingal, South Dublin and Dublin City.
Say most counties would field at least 40 players at senior level during an average year. (Probably a lot more but I'll settle for 40.) Straightaway, at least additional 120 players would get to compare their skills with the best in the game and that's the ambition of all who play at this level in any given year.
It would also mean 4 additional senior club championships and so on down the line.
How many Dublin club players drop out of the game before they would wish because of the lack of opportunity to advance to at least one higher level?
IMO, that's the real tragedy.
In short, the GAA is pandering to Dublin's mendacious demands and in the process is endangering the very future of the organisation.

5
GAA Discussion / Re: Kerry's crown under pressure?
« on: February 16, 2019, 12:10:18 AM »
At the end of the day, you ask the likes of Mike Sheehy how many All-Irelands he won and he can show you 8, same for a lot of the rest of that great Kerry team. They also won the majority (exception 1980) of those All-Irelands in style, whereas Dublin scraped past the post. 5 in a row won't make Dublin a greater team.

Jesus, the ignorance - ask the likes of Cluxton, O'Sullivan and McCarthy how many do they have and they will say six and gunning for seven. Huge difference, eh?
The vital difference, my erudite friend, is that Kerry played on a level pitch with every other county.
They didn't have the benefits of state of the art physical training or sports psychology either. Come to think of it, they didn't have the combined total of 16 other counties to choose from either and more importantly perhaps, the national resources of 50% of it s resources either. (BTW, Simon Coveney said that first, not me.)
I am not being anti-Dublin for the sake of it when I say this.
But I defer to the judgement of Mick O'Dwyer on the subject. (Well, he would say this, wouldn't he?)
According to Micko, the greatest team of all time should compete on equal terms with at least one other side. Kerry beat the socks off all comers during their reign and Dublin...?
What about Mayo? With roughly one tenth of Dublin's population and with tremendous travelling issues, they did remarkably well , didn't they?
So, Dublin may well pull clear of all others in this years championships and all along the route to it and that would mean at least two years clear of the rest. I would be willing to consider them to be the best then but I will wait until and, more importantly, if, that should happen. until then, I'll not commit myself to anything.

6
GAA Discussion / Re: NFL Division 1 2019 Dubs again?
« on: February 15, 2019, 11:24:31 PM »
I expect a loss on Saturday   , with a defeat to Tyrone the following week highly likely , relegation would then be on the cards. I expect a very poor show in the championship ,  with a few depressing retirements at the end of the season the likes we'll never see again . It will be a dull dark gloomy period over the next two years . You'd have to think if Dublin win 7/8 in a row the county game itself might die altogether too.

You don't have to ask Mystic Meg what's ahead for Mayo. Championship wise a lot will depend on a lucky draw for how far we progress.  Mayo not qualifying for the Super 8 last year was a financial disaster for Corporate GAA. So Corporate GAA will do their best to make sure they are there this year.

The game is dead for all teams outside division One, and that's being nice to Cavan and Roscommon. It's even being nice to the other 5! Dublin roll on and we are told we need them to be big and powerful for the GAA to prosper financially. Problem is they need opponents and they don't have any. Dublin fans are getting bored. We are all getting bored. Great hopes of the last couple of years like, Mayo, Tyrone, Kerry and Monaghan, Donegal have come up short and are coming up shorter each year. Kerry because of tradition look like the best bet to topple the Dubs in the future and that in it own way is as depressing as total Dublin domination.

There is a lot more to championship football than just winning the All Ireland. Sport as in life can be about the journey not just the destination and i don't think some Mayo supporters appreciate the journey they have been on since Horan became manager the first time. Now park your dead talk and focus on the topic of the thread which is Div 1 league football.
why do you think the Mayo support has held up as well as it has if we idnt appreciate the journey . don't pay any attention to the moanbags on here from mayo some have ben predicting the end of the world since  horan came last time if not before.
some of mayo best matches have been ones they  ended up losing im thinking of Kerry in limerick  in particular and they lost  no glory or honour  and won a lot of fans in the process.
I would rather mayo lose with their dignity intact rather than go down the route of galway and try and bore every one to death despite possibly having the best set of forwards in the county
Bang on Ross, stuff the begrudgers!
Mayo have shag all money to spend on anything bar travelling expenses. So they spent over €580,000 one year that's listed under travelling expenses. (Was it last year?)
But that'snot the full story- not by a long shot.
Sometimes they hold collective sessions come championship in Mayo. (Bekan?) At other times, they train in Dublin and that means renting a pitch and paying hotel costs for those travelling up. And to cap it all, they have also rented a pitch somewhere in the midlands. Now, I am certain that only applies to the senior panel and is one of the main reasons why Mayo can't be arsed with the league. No helicopters on call for our hardy bucks.  ;D;D
Can all this be true?
 Well, that's what I read in my copy of the Indo on Wednesday anyway.

7
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: February 15, 2019, 11:06:25 PM »
Ha, good man Lar. I think Mayo have missed the boat in terms of winning any All Ireland in my lifetime , never mind edging 2.
Don't you mind a bit, Farr. Armageddon, aka James Horan mark 2, is on the scene again and he won't miss the boat this time around.
The Greatest can gloat all he likes but he will lose bragging rights sometime soon, very very soon!  ;D

8
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: February 13, 2019, 11:18:34 PM »
https://m.independent.ie/sport/gaelic-games/ewan-mackenna-how-obscenely-good-dublin-gaa-have-it-is-best-highlighted-by-how-disgracefully-bad-some-others-have-it-37771428.html

When are counties like Fermanagh, Leitrim, Longford and Sligo going to learn that they are not worth investing money in? They have little or no fan base. The GAA are not going to invest in half arse supported counties. There's no money in it!
They already full know it. When Croke Park turns them down, the county board meekly retreat. Shrug, move on. No fight, no effort at publicising it. All the Dubs fault of course.

The reality is that people are deflecting.

They say that the Dublin underage teams are not dominating. That's a straw man argument. Kids dont benefit from sports science. They are kids. They benefit from coaching and practice and only when they get to an older age does the finanical doping kick in with more analysis, more sophisticated sports science. If anything it proves the point. Dublin are not dominating because those players are not naturally the best players. They are coached and moulded into a system that makes them dominate.

Dublins game is a tightly defined system based on an athletic running game. They run and run and run with ball in hand and they will bring in a few more lads off the bench to run. They dont play a particularly stylish game though they do have a few exceptional players. They play in a tightly defined system. They in the main wear you down by sheer athleticism and a deep bench and each player playing a role. Throw in a few reliable free takers and its a template that can take even average or below average kids and win games. Plenty of Dublin players were not underage stars. Brian Fenton was playing Junior B for example. They will analyse a Defensive system like tyrones and systematically take it apart. That system takes resources, analaysis, and lots and lots of money.

You would never see a Gooch play for Dublin for example. A scrawny skillfull player. He just wouldnt fit the template.

Dublin Football had a tradition. Add in the finanical doping and they have dominated Leinster and then the All Ireland. This will continue. One or two traditional counties will give them a game but will eventually be burnt off and Football will be over.

Dublin do not have a hurling tradition. None. Their last all ireland final appearance was 1938. Yet were able to compete from a zero base with enormous financial resources being pumped in brining in outside Counties managers. However Hurling relies much more than football on skill rather than athleticism.

As the coaching improves and the current generation of players turn the corner into coaches then Dublin will have tradition and in another ten years will probably come to Dominate Hurling in the Same way.

The reality is the full time administrators are Dubs and will prioritise their own county and it wont change and they wont care.Throw in the fact they play most of their games at home and it generates money then Dublin are basically a home town team soaking up all the money around

It doesnt detract that they have good players or a good manager or hard working back room team.

But it does detract from the sport and from fair play. Most fair weather fans dont care. And they have jumped on the bandwagon.

Anyone who actually cares about the game and its long term survival does.
That’s a five-star post!
It’s not just that I am agree with you (or are a jealous culchie or whatever!); figures speak for themselves and Ewan McKenna, Brolly, O'Rourke and other high profile journos are telling the reality as they see it.
THere are quite a few genuine Dub supporters here and they don’t honestly know what the fuss is all about. After all, Kerry, and Kilkenny in hurling, had unprecedented spells of success and no one is complaining about them so why begrudge Dublin who just happens to have a once-in-a-lifetime team etc. etc.
According to govt. Sources, (Simon Coveney, last April) Dublin now has over one third of the republic’s population and, crucially, half of its resources. He population is projected to pass the halfway mark by 2040 and still GAA HQ see no cause for alarm.
Problem is that Dublin = 35% of the population down south. Of course, the GAA needs to have Dublin pulling in the crowds but it takes two to tango and unless Dublin has worthwhile opposition, the general public won’t pay to see an endless procession of worthless victories by the DUblin assembly belt.
Kerry and probably Mayo will possibly edge an AI or two once in a while but as time goes by, the gap between Dublin and the rest will continue to widen and there will be no possibility of any other team in the land going toe to toe with Dublin for any period of time.
I don’t blame the genuine Dub fans, here or elsewhere, it’s not Dublin’s fault that they enjoy massive superiority in so many ways. It’s up to other counties to object to the blatant discrimination where development funds is concerned.
I am sick of moaners. There is no point in highlighting obvious discrimination and then going all meekly with what’s on offer.
The super 8s is a case in point. It can never be a success- financial or otherwise. It’s not possible to have 8 top class sides at any time and most most games will be meaningless and, to cap it all, the club scene is being badly compromised because of even less weekends available for club competitions.
It’s possible to fiddle about with rule changes as if a new brand of sticking plaster could keep the Titanic afloat! There’s a domino effect here and HQ won’t or can’t see the obvious problems that exist. So Dublin ramps up its production line and other counties will attempt to keep pace= Kerry, Mayo and a few others at best.
Then other counties down the pecking order will realise that not alone Dublin but their closest rivals also, will be virtually odds-on certs to hammer all others and the feeling of inevitably grows and the paying public switches off.
Two tier competition? Anyone thinking that this is a panacea of any sort should remember what happened to the Tommy Murphy competition.

9
GAA Discussion / Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« on: February 12, 2019, 11:07:25 PM »
Meh! Stuck up the wrong graphic. The one above just gives the no. of registered players per co., not the amounts of grant money doled out.
Too busy for a few days to follow this up. Can do so next week. That is, if anyone is really bothered! ;D)

10
GAA Discussion / Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« on: February 12, 2019, 08:39:51 PM »
For what it’s worth, I wish people would shut the f**k up about Dublin getting larger grants.

A quarter of the population live in that county. If they weren’t receiving an exceptional percentage of overall funding spend, it would be wholly unfair on people born in Dublin, and would be detrimental to the GAA’s grassroots policy of “get them involved with their club early, get them involved for life”.

This is NOT a modern GAA problem. This one rolls all the way back to 1884, when the core constructs of the Association were founded upon the well-meaning and identity-building - but fundamentally imbalanced - partition of jurisdictions according to county lines.

It just so happens that Dublin have come across a golden generation of players at the same time that social media has enabled every dimwit across the land to have an opinion, and to drumbeat the populist narrative. The Dublin dominance issue will  fix itself in a couple of year, except the dimwits in 10 years time will then be yelping about how the GAA needs a strong Dublin.


——-

Fundamentally, where the suits need put in order, is this.

1. Core values of community and volunteering need stamped on their foreheads, sent as daily reminders, typed in 10 foot letters at the top of every letter or enail they read. Every decision they make needs to be evaluated against how it improves the Association for communities and volunteers. If it doesn’t help them, don’t proceed..

2. Strategies, annual budgets and forecasts should focus on minimising expenditure, and not maximising revenue. This concept does not rule out large infrastructure projects or a commitment to coaching; as both provide advantages to members. But it should minimise the desire/need/will to collect pits of cash and then decide what to spend it on. The purpose of this organisation should never be to gather money.

——
I think you are missing the point here. The development grant(s) are not dished out to counties but per individual player. Going by the last published figures I know of, (2010-2014) Dublin got over €274 per individual, regardless of status.By comparison each  Mayo was paid €22 (or thereabouts) and Kerry got the princely sum of €19 for every player they had registered.
For the record, Dublin has easily the lowest participation rate of any county in Ireland. Here I am talking about active participation as players or supporters.
No rocket science involved here- say Dublin play Longford and 50% of the population of Longford turn up, whereas it would be unlikely that Dublin would bring anywhere near 5% of its population along. Which county would have the greater support at the game?
Lots of apples and oranges there Lar.

here's the actual breakdown:


Sorry Hound, I couldn’t respond sooner than now.
I don’t doubt your word and if the info you posted is relevant in some way to the discussion in hand, I’ll take your word for it.


But, for the life of me, I can’t make head nor tail of what these stats mean!
I take it that it’s the General Development Fund’s grants to primary schools. Now, who got the money, the principal or a particular GAA club?
Was there specific conditions attached to the payment of these grants?
I am going to assume that the dosh was given to some club or other and from there on, it was (is?) up to the club to devise a training schedule to qualify for the money from the GDF.
Otherwise, I cannot see how the scheme could operate. Farr will tell you that no school principal could allow any outsider to dictate school policy with regard to activities of any sort during school hours.
So, who gets the money and what are the duties /requirements to qualify for the it?
I was heavily involved with primary schools GAA for decades in Finglas and I had (still) have excellent relations with the Isles.
They were the first club I heard of to begin sending young players out to schools in the area to help coach kids after hours and, in some cases, they assisted schools in fielding teams for competitions but , again school policy wouldn’t allow a complete takeover of anything to do with the school by anyone  who could be termed an outsider. Insurance complications involved otherwise.
Now, with three teachers heavily involved in pushing Gah games within my school and with every possible help from the Isles there was never a pickup of more than 5% of pupis who stayed with the club after they left the school and moved n to secondary level.
What I am leading up to is that allocating cash for kids who are not going to be of any use to the GAA  after they leave primary school is a bit daft to me.
My county allegiances is one thing but I am a Gah man at heart and I’d love to see kids everywhere playing the native games but I don’t see any major increase in participation in any clubs or schools I am aware of.

The infographic is simply the games development funds by county divided by schoolkid in the county.

The GPO's in Dublin are funded 50% by the GAA, and 50% of their time is spent with primary schools. Some people may think this is a waste, but the aim is to increase participation, to get that 5% in Finglas up. And remember the GPO is teaching basis football and camogie to girls just as much as football and hurling to boys.
Fair enough, Hound. So, I can take it that half the funds per county comes from central funds and the rest is up to each county board to come up with. Correct?
For starters, I can’t see many counties being able to come up with the sort of cash needed to pay the price of a bag of crisps and a lollipop for every child under its jurisdiction.
Anyway, if the cash is there, will it be allocated to coaching children who actually attend sessions? In Ballyfermot, you’d be lucky to find 8% of primary pupils who’d be arsed to attend more than a couple of coaching sessions. In Ballyhaunis, the figure could well be 80%. If a fixed amount per kid is paid, then clubs in Ballyer stand to get an awful lot more. I must be missing something or other.
 
Here is the infographic I was referring to in my earliest post:
(https://media.balls.ie/uploads/2016/10/04232200/GAA-Investment-1.jpg)
This was taken from Balls.ie

“...................  Shane Mangan has tweeted a number of fascinating graphics which put the Dublin investment in stark relation to the level of investment in other counties.
Shane calculated how much in € was invested per player in each county by the GAA, under the umbrella of their 'Games Development'. He calculated the investment per registered player in each county from 2015.”


HERE is the graphic he is referring to:

11
GAA Discussion / Re: NFL Division 1 2019 Dubs again?
« on: February 11, 2019, 09:18:20 PM »
Mayo are 7/2 v the Dubs the next day
Nice price if the Dubs don't turn up again

A very nice price. Apart from Dublin no other side has performed consistently well in Croke park like Mayo have over the last number of years. Horan will likely pick his strongest and most experienced team for this game as he will know a win will likely stop Dublin from reaching the final which would give Mayo a much better chance to win a first national title for 18 years.

Mayo have not beaten Dublin in League and Championship since 2012. That's nearly 7 years.

Would that be case if James Horan had remained manager all this time? Horan has beaten Dublin in both league and championship.
Ah, if only me auntie... ;D ;D
We will never know. It could help to pass a few cold winter nights in front of a blazing fire and sitting on a high stoll with a pint in yer hand and a few earlier ones settling down nicely but other than that, it's of no relevance now.
But if I was sitting on the stool beside you, I'd be inclined to bet that Horan wouldn't have won an AI in his first term.
Maybe he is older and wiser now. Hope so anyway.
He proved to be awfully slow to make running changes in the course of games and by all accounts was one obstinate hoor to deal with- my way o the high way- ask James Nallen or Kieran Shannon about that.
For my money, there was sweet FA between the Dublin and Mayo in recent games and all could have gone the other way. But, it wasn't just a case of Dublin having the rub of the green every time either. If they had lost any of those games, their fans would be bitching about borderline decisions or blind bleedin' refs or whatever.
For me, the  essential little nudge Dublin got to take the over the line each time came from the bench.
They had and will have an inexhaustible supply of talented young players coming through all the time.
For Horan, it was a case of all fur coat and no knickers every year. He had a super first fifteen but the backup talent needed to win just wasn't there.
This year is starting to look good and I'm beginning to hope again- maybe not this year but next one might be interesting.
 I mean there are a lot of young players about now that look as if they could be useful to downright brilliant in the not-too-distant future.

12
GAA Discussion / Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« on: February 11, 2019, 08:52:54 PM »
For what it’s worth, I wish people would shut the f**k up about Dublin getting larger grants.

A quarter of the population live in that county. If they weren’t receiving an exceptional percentage of overall funding spend, it would be wholly unfair on people born in Dublin, and would be detrimental to the GAA’s grassroots policy of “get them involved with their club early, get them involved for life”.

This is NOT a modern GAA problem. This one rolls all the way back to 1884, when the core constructs of the Association were founded upon the well-meaning and identity-building - but fundamentally imbalanced - partition of jurisdictions according to county lines.

It just so happens that Dublin have come across a golden generation of players at the same time that social media has enabled every dimwit across the land to have an opinion, and to drumbeat the populist narrative. The Dublin dominance issue will  fix itself in a couple of year, except the dimwits in 10 years time will then be yelping about how the GAA needs a strong Dublin.


——-

Fundamentally, where the suits need put in order, is this.

1. Core values of community and volunteering need stamped on their foreheads, sent as daily reminders, typed in 10 foot letters at the top of every letter or enail they read. Every decision they make needs to be evaluated against how it improves the Association for communities and volunteers. If it doesn’t help them, don’t proceed..

2. Strategies, annual budgets and forecasts should focus on minimising expenditure, and not maximising revenue. This concept does not rule out large infrastructure projects or a commitment to coaching; as both provide advantages to members. But it should minimise the desire/need/will to collect pits of cash and then decide what to spend it on. The purpose of this organisation should never be to gather money.

——
I think you are missing the point here. The development grant(s) are not dished out to counties but per individual player. Going by the last published figures I know of, (2010-2014) Dublin got over €274 per individual, regardless of status.By comparison each  Mayo was paid €22 (or thereabouts) and Kerry got the princely sum of €19 for every player they had registered.
For the record, Dublin has easily the lowest participation rate of any county in Ireland. Here I am talking about active participation as players or supporters.
No rocket science involved here- say Dublin play Longford and 50% of the population of Longford turn up, whereas it would be unlikely that Dublin would bring anywhere near 5% of its population along. Which county would have the greater support at the game?
Lots of apples and oranges there Lar.

here's the actual breakdown:


Sorry Hound, I couldn’t respond sooner than now.
I don’t doubt your word and if the info you posted is relevant in some way to the discussion in hand, I’ll take your word for it.


But, for the life of me, I can’t make head nor tail of what these stats mean!
I take it that it’s the General Development Fund’s grants to primary schools. Now, who got the money, the principal or a particular GAA club?
Was there specific conditions attached to the payment of these grants?
I am going to assume that the dosh was given to some club or other and from there on, it was (is?) up to the club to devise a training schedule to qualify for the money from the GDF.
Otherwise, I cannot see how the scheme could operate. Farr will tell you that no school principal could allow any outsider to dictate school policy with regard to activities of any sort during school hours.
So, who gets the money and what are the duties /requirements to qualify for the it?
I was heavily involved with primary schools GAA for decades in Finglas and I had (still) have excellent relations with the Isles.
They were the first club I heard of to begin sending young players out to schools in the area to help coach kids after hours and, in some cases, they assisted schools in fielding teams for competitions but , again school policy wouldn’t allow a complete takeover of anything to do with the school by anyone  who could be termed an outsider. Insurance complications involved otherwise.
Now, with three teachers heavily involved in pushing Gah games within my school and with every possible help from the Isles there was never a pickup of more than 5% of pupis who stayed with the club after they left the school and moved n to secondary level.
What I am leading up to is that allocating cash for kids who are not going to be of any use to the GAA  after they leave primary school is a bit daft to me.
My county allegiances is one thing but I am a Gah man at heart and I’d love to see kids everywhere playing the native games but I don’t see any major increase in participation in any clubs or schools I am aware of.
money is never given directly to schools
and just because a school has a big number of pupils doesn't mean they are all getting coaching by the county board provided coaching hours.
eg in our county all the coaching hours given to schools are focused on the junior and senior infants and fundamental skills (I personally think this is the wrong age group to be funding coaching for) for usually a six week block. So 75% of the pupils in the school get no contact time with a GAA coach.
Whereas in Dublin the coaching model is different and much more on getting the kids out playing the sport and down to the local club, which is a much better model.
Fair enough, I can follow your meaning but it doesn’t answer the questions I put to Hound.
Originally, I was referring to the row that kicked off the Dublin, GAA and Money  (or whatever) thread. The infographic URL posted around post #5 or 6 was what I considered the actual report.
Until Hound put up the one we are talking about now, I had never heard of its existence and I still don’t see what relevance it has to GDF initiatives to promote coaching to any children, boys or girls.
If, as it appears to me, the money is given to local clubs and is based on the numbers of school children in the area, then Dublin must be even more in front of the posse than I thought.
That just cannot possibly be the case.
Anyway, on a wider issue, is there any way of keeping tabs on central funds given to clubs for GD work? Is there any degree of accountability or scrutiny involved?

13
GAA Discussion / Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« on: February 11, 2019, 12:02:47 PM »
For what it’s worth, I wish people would shut the f**k up about Dublin getting larger grants.

A quarter of the population live in that county. If they weren’t receiving an exceptional percentage of overall funding spend, it would be wholly unfair on people born in Dublin, and would be detrimental to the GAA’s grassroots policy of “get them involved with their club early, get them involved for life”.

This is NOT a modern GAA problem. This one rolls all the way back to 1884, when the core constructs of the Association were founded upon the well-meaning and identity-building - but fundamentally imbalanced - partition of jurisdictions according to county lines.

It just so happens that Dublin have come across a golden generation of players at the same time that social media has enabled every dimwit across the land to have an opinion, and to drumbeat the populist narrative. The Dublin dominance issue will  fix itself in a couple of year, except the dimwits in 10 years time will then be yelping about how the GAA needs a strong Dublin.


——-

Fundamentally, where the suits need put in order, is this.

1. Core values of community and volunteering need stamped on their foreheads, sent as daily reminders, typed in 10 foot letters at the top of every letter or enail they read. Every decision they make needs to be evaluated against how it improves the Association for communities and volunteers. If it doesn’t help them, don’t proceed..

2. Strategies, annual budgets and forecasts should focus on minimising expenditure, and not maximising revenue. This concept does not rule out large infrastructure projects or a commitment to coaching; as both provide advantages to members. But it should minimise the desire/need/will to collect pits of cash and then decide what to spend it on. The purpose of this organisation should never be to gather money.

——
I think you are missing the point here. The development grant(s) are not dished out to counties but per individual player. Going by the last published figures I know of, (2010-2014) Dublin got over €274 per individual, regardless of status.By comparison each  Mayo was paid €22 (or thereabouts) and Kerry got the princely sum of €19 for every player they had registered.
For the record, Dublin has easily the lowest participation rate of any county in Ireland. Here I am talking about active participation as players or supporters.
No rocket science involved here- say Dublin play Longford and 50% of the population of Longford turn up, whereas it would be unlikely that Dublin would bring anywhere near 5% of its population along. Which county would have the greater support at the game?
Lots of apples and oranges there Lar.

here's the actual breakdown:


Sorry Hound, I couldn’t respond sooner than now.
I don’t doubt your word and if the info you posted is relevant in some way to the discussion in hand, I’ll take your word for it.


But, for the life of me, I can’t make head nor tail of what these stats mean!
I take it that it’s the General Development Fund’s grants to primary schools. Now, who got the money, the principal or a particular GAA club?
Was there specific conditions attached to the payment of these grants?
I am going to assume that the dosh was given to some club or other and from there on, it was (is?) up to the club to devise a training schedule to qualify for the money from the GDF.
Otherwise, I cannot see how the scheme could operate. Farr will tell you that no school principal could allow any outsider to dictate school policy with regard to activities of any sort during school hours.
So, who gets the money and what are the duties /requirements to qualify for the it?
I was heavily involved with primary schools GAA for decades in Finglas and I had (still) have excellent relations with the Isles.
They were the first club I heard of to begin sending young players out to schools in the area to help coach kids after hours and, in some cases, they assisted schools in fielding teams for competitions but , again school policy wouldn’t allow a complete takeover of anything to do with the school by anyone  who could be termed an outsider. Insurance complications involved otherwise.
Now, with three teachers heavily involved in pushing Gah games within my school and with every possible help from the Isles there was never a pickup of more than 5% of pupis who stayed with the club after they left the school and moved n to secondary level.
What I am leading up to is that allocating cash for kids who are not going to be of any use to the GAA  after they leave primary school is a bit daft to me.
My county allegiances is one thing but I am a Gah man at heart and I’d love to see kids everywhere playing the native games but I don’t see any major increase in participation in any clubs or schools I am aware of.

14
GAA Discussion / Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« on: February 09, 2019, 10:18:20 PM »
For what it’s worth, I wish people would shut the f**k up about Dublin getting larger grants.

A quarter of the population live in that county. If they weren’t receiving an exceptional percentage of overall funding spend, it would be wholly unfair on people born in Dublin, and would be detrimental to the GAA’s grassroots policy of “get them involved with their club early, get them involved for life”.

This is NOT a modern GAA problem. This one rolls all the way back to 1884, when the core constructs of the Association were founded upon the well-meaning and identity-building - but fundamentally imbalanced - partition of jurisdictions according to county lines.

It just so happens that Dublin have come across a golden generation of players at the same time that social media has enabled every dimwit across the land to have an opinion, and to drumbeat the populist narrative. The Dublin dominance issue will  fix itself in a couple of year, except the dimwits in 10 years time will then be yelping about how the GAA needs a strong Dublin.


——-

Fundamentally, where the suits need put in order, is this.

1. Core values of community and volunteering need stamped on their foreheads, sent as daily reminders, typed in 10 foot letters at the top of every letter or enail they read. Every decision they make needs to be evaluated against how it improves the Association for communities and volunteers. If it doesn’t help them, don’t proceed..

2. Strategies, annual budgets and forecasts should focus on minimising expenditure, and not maximising revenue. This concept does not rule out large infrastructure projects or a commitment to coaching; as both provide advantages to members. But it should minimise the desire/need/will to collect pits of cash and then decide what to spend it on. The purpose of this organisation should never be to gather money.

——
I think you are missing the point here. The development grant(s) are not dished out to counties but per individual player. Going by the last published figures I know of, (2010-2014) Dublin got over €274 per individual, regardless of status.By comparison each  Mayo was paid €22 (or thereabouts) and Kerry got the princely sum of €19 for every player they had registered.
For the record, Dublin has easily the lowest participation rate of any county in Ireland. Here I am talking about active participation as players or supporters.
No rocket science involved here- say Dublin play Longford and 50% of the population of Longford turn up, whereas it would be unlikely that Dublin would bring anywhere near 5% of its population along. Which county would have the greater support at the game?

15
Game not till Sunday lads. More than likely the snow will have gone by then.

More snow in Omagh again tonight

A lot more snow needed from a Mayo point of view. Very callow team selected. Looks like an FBD team.
Not so sure I'd agree with you there, moy. The defence is close enough to the best he has got right now. The midfielders, if they can control their tempers, will both be strong contenders for a midfield spot in games to come and the forwards do have some inexperienced lads but young Diskin and Reape have been showing well in what we have seen of them to date. Both look likely t be pressing for places when summer comes around.
Matter of fact, I'm putting my 50 cent on our side; Tyrone didn't impress me last year nor did they look the real deal the last day either.

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