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Messages - Lar Naparka

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1
GAA Discussion / Re: Leinster Club SFC 2018
« on: December 09, 2018, 06:26:44 PM »
They say every dog will have its day and that goes for underdogs too. Fair play to St Columba's- worthy Leinster champions.

2
General discussion / Re: Tautologies
« on: December 08, 2018, 12:24:58 AM »
A cute Kerry hoor!

3
General discussion / Re: Tautologies
« on: December 06, 2018, 09:32:31 AM »
 I saw it with me own two eyes, so I did!

4
General discussion / Re: Tautologies
« on: December 05, 2018, 05:08:54 PM »
Free, gratis and for nothing.

5
General discussion / Re: Jay Donnelly
« on: November 30, 2018, 09:31:52 PM »
What exactly has he done and will he do time?
WTF is Jay Donnelly?  Villanova?

6
GAA Discussion / Re: Connacht Centre of Excellence
« on: November 26, 2018, 06:31:28 PM »
Floodlit all weather pitches are needed in the West and midlands

To play club games and school games all year
Most clubs and counties cannot afford to put in those sort of facilities

Why all weather. If they were grass and done properly they wouldnt need to be Astro. Astro is not good for GAA in my opinion.
Dunno. The cost of laying down a top class pitch by Prunty or the likes could cost a lot more than a half-decent Astro one.

7
GAA Discussion / Re: Welcome
« on: November 23, 2018, 01:08:48 AM »
One of the OWC brigade, nifan, has been absent for about 5 years. He was one of the more popular posters on the board and subject to sectarian abuse from several others. Have to say I miss him.

8

Splitting Dublin is just a non runner for me. Nonsense.

How about splitting up New Zealand into North and South islands to give others a chance?

England have 100,000 more adults playing rugby than Ireland does. France and S. Africa 5X our numbers. In recent years we can beat them. Why?

Look at the County Manager Merry Go-Round thread. Madness out there. Recent Ros. manager appointment the latest one. How is that going to end up?!
All thatís fine as far as it goes moy but, as Colm OíRourke said, itís not whatís at issue here.
Dublin now has around one third of the population of the Republic. (Dunno the taig/prod breakdown in Norn Iron so Iíll stick with the other 26.)
Government estimates are that by 2040, half the country will live in the greater Dublin area.
One team to represent one third of the entire country is not good either Dublin or the rest. OíRourke makes the point that they are many club players in Dublin who would walk onto any other senior side in the land and heís dead right.
There are only so many places on a football panel anywhere and Dublin could easily field another team or two to compete with the rest.
The Dublin set up at club and county level is elitist, pure and simple. Nothing wrong with that. They are making best use of what is available to them but it comes at a mighty price to the GAA within the county and to the rest of the country also.
Massive clubs like Ballyboden and Kilmacud, to mention only two, makes have hundreds of kids but only one senior team.
Some will drop out anyway as they move up through the grades but many more will leave because thereís no room for them to play any higher.
That team will be the elite of the club as only the best can fight their way to the top. So itís no wonder Jim Gavin has any amount of top class players pressing hard for a place on the first fifteen.
The Dubs will never fail due to a lack of interest or motivation. There isnít a single player who will ever be able to take it easy, thinking there is no else to fill his shoes.
I donít want to upset any genuine Dub fans here but the loss to the GAA in general terms is a pretty high one.

I dunno. For a start the Greater Dublin Area is not County Dublin and before long will probably include most of the province of Leinster. The National Transport Authority has defined the Greater Dublin Area as including the counties of Dublin, Meath, Kildare, and Wicklow. So if the population of this region rises as expected should we be expecting other counties in the region like Meath and Kildare to field multiple teams also?
Census 2016 results show that Meath was one of the fastest growing counties in the country with Meath's population growing by 5.9 per cent in five years to 195,044. I'll put it this way. Meath has a way bigger population now than when they last were winning AIs. The population issue is relevant for some counties but not for Colm's Meath or Kildare either. Reality is that when Dubs are playing in an AI final a good proportion of the city population wouldn't even be aware of it and others would resent it.
I dunno either and thatís a fact. To begin with, I got my figures courtesy of Simon Coveney and he was referring to the Greater Dublin Area. There is no formal definition of the GDA  but to the govt. planners, itís the territory inside a line stretching from Drogheda through Navan,
Thatís what Coveney was referring to.
County Dublin, according to the 2016 census had 28% of the stateís population and this was projected to rise to 40% by 2040. Already, those estimates appear to be conservative.
Put another way, going by the stats from that census, Dublin at present has the same pop as a total of 15 other counties, working back from Leitrim.THe gap between Dublin and the rest is steadily growing.
This is why OíRourke refers to the number of Dublin players, good enough to play intercounty football anywhere else but who will never get a chance to wear a county jersey.  Same goes for Dublin clubs- maybe a hundred or more kids milling about at the weekend but with about the same number of senior, junior and u20 players as,say, Mitchels or Stephenites or Ballintubber in Mayo but they have a much smaller membership.
Letís say that those three have a combined membership equal to that of Ballyboden- okay so far? But they will all have senior sides (and junior, u20 etc.)
So if you have five hundred kids and you want the greatest number possible to play with their respective clubs until they retire, which way should you go, one mega club or three smaller ones?
I knowí Boden well and like Erinís Isle that I know a lot better, you couldnít get nicer, more committed members and team mentors there than anywhere else. But the size of the bigger Dublin clubs may produce quality players at the business end but at a cost of a horrendous drop out rate through the lower grades.

The real crux of the matter where Dublin is concerned is not at intercounty level but it begins at a much earlier stage.

9

Splitting Dublin is just a non runner for me. Nonsense.

How about splitting up New Zealand into North and South islands to give others a chance?

England have 100,000 more adults playing rugby than Ireland does. France and S. Africa 5X our numbers. In recent years we can beat them. Why?

Look at the County Manager Merry Go-Round thread. Madness out there. Recent Ros. manager appointment the latest one. How is that going to end up?!
All thatís fine as far as it goes moy but, as Colm OíRourke said, itís not whatís at issue here.
Dublin now has around one third of the population of the Republic. (Dunno the taig/prod breakdown in Norn Iron so Iíll stick with the other 26.)
Government estimates are that by 2040, half the country will live in the greater Dublin area.
One team to represent one third of the entire country is not good either Dublin or the rest. OíRourke makes the point that they are many club players in Dublin who would walk onto any other senior side in the land and heís dead right.
There are only so many places on a football panel anywhere and Dublin could easily field another team or two to compete with the rest.
The Dublin set up at club and county level is elitist, pure and simple. Nothing wrong with that. They are making best use of what is available to them but it comes at a mighty price to the GAA within the county and to the rest of the country also.
Massive clubs like Ballyboden and Kilmacud, to mention only two, makes have hundreds of kids but only one senior team.
Some will drop out anyway as they move up through the grades but many more will leave because thereís no room for them to play any higher.
That team will be the elite of the club as only the best can fight their way to the top. So itís no wonder Jim Gavin has any amount of top class players pressing hard for a place on the first fifteen.
The Dubs will never fail due to a lack of interest or motivation. There isnít a single player who will ever be able to take it easy, thinking there is no else to fill his shoes.
I donít want to upset any genuine Dub fans here but the loss to the GAA in general terms is a pretty high one.

10
Couldn't see it either.
If rural no economy Roscommon and Monaghan can produce players ton make them top 10 teams surely to God the better off  bigger populated Counties of Laois, Offaly and Westmeath should be able to do so also?
Or is th'oul hurley stuff getting in the way?
Dunno what happened lads, it was working fine when I posted it.

Here is the article in full:
We have to talk about Dublin and by extension, everywhere else. That causes complications. It elicits a strong response from the normal quarters so it is difficult to make any case without the debate turning into something unintended.

So it would be nice if the debate on the future role of Dublin at both club and county level was conducted free from prejudice. It would also be nice if it's free from the standard reply of players who, almost like they're following a rehearsed script, will argue that Dublin's success is down to all the volunteers who put in an enormous amount of work when players are coming up through the ranks. We all know that. It is not the point.

It should also be free from former players saying that Dublin have only won a relatively small amount over the last 50 years and nobody mentioned any changes to the status of Kilkenny or Kerry when they were hoovering up All-Irelands. That is not the point either.

And the clowns who could not help themselves but launch into a tirade of abuse about my writings on a debate about splitting up Dublin after this year's All-Ireland are certainly not the point either.

And free from administrators arguing that the population and financial clout of Dublin does not give it an unfair advantage. They are missing the point altogether, but naturally enough self-preservation is the key there.

This debate is unlikely to come at central level for some time. John Costello, the Dublin chief executive, has no interest in it, neither has the president John Horan, from Dublin, and it does not appear to be on the radar of Tom Ryan, who has spent a lot of time involved with Dublin club hurling. It is up to him mainly to plot a course for the next decade and let us all know his vision.

In some respects it is a very bad time to question anything about Dublin. The easy thing for opponents to say when Dublin are on top is that the arguments are borne out of envy, jealousy or worse. That the problem lies with poor standards elsewhere and people should look after their own business rather than interfering with the brand that is successful. There is certainly merit in identifying the failures in many counties, none more so than in Meath, but that does not tackle the issue.

Even when this great Dublin team are beaten, the issue will remain that the natural advantages of the capital city and county are such that few counties will be competitive again (many never were), but also more importantly that the present model of the GAA in Dublin is not good for the organisation long term. Maybe not even for Dublin itself where it is still a struggle for the GAA to gain traction in plenty of city areas. Football has become a middle-class game and old working-class communities play soccer primarily rather than football or hurling. There is a need for more clubs.

There is also a major issue of player opportunity which should be addressed. Few players will get the chance to play with Dublin relative to the numbers available, even some of the very best. Over the last few weeks I have watched Kilmacud Crokes in the flesh twice. First in the Dublin county final and last week against Dunboyne in the Leinster club championship.

Dunboyne were certainly way below their usual standard, yet at the same time I could not help but think that there are at least six Kilmacud players who would get on almost all county teams, except Dublin of course. That is leaving out Paul Mannion, whose standard of play is in a different league altogether. Are they lucky to be born in Dublin and playing with a great club side or unfortunate that they have no chance of playing county football?

Opinions may differ on this, but every player would like to test themselves at the highest possible level. Should they be allowed to declare for someone else? Should other counties be allowed to approach players in Dublin clubs who would make a big difference to their cause?

Perhaps those in positions of influence might give their views on that. A type of transfer system. Obviously many of the weaker counties would not be attractive in this context, so it would only benefit a few. Yet something is needed to rebalance a county game which is less and less competitive.

Kilmacud may not win the Leinster or All-Ireland club championship this year, but they would beat half the county teams in the country. In some ways the success and brilliant organisation of clubs like Kilmacud and Ballyboden, who can turn out over a hundred teams, also reflects other issues which need discussion within Dublin. At what point are clubs too big? Would more clubs attract more players?

This is a growing city problem which is in absolute contrast to many rural clubs who are finding it increasingly difficult to field teams at underage level. Smaller families and falling population as a result of planning laws is destroying not just clubs but rural life as well. Who has a plan for that? GAA clubs have to amalgamate, sometimes two or three clubs to field an underage team. The strong get stronger, the weak get trampled on.

I thought of this when I saw on TV recently that the power stations of the midlands are closing - an absolute hammer blow to a lot of rural areas. To the GAA club, to the local national school, the post office, the shop, the pub, everything that binds these communities together. Maybe I missed something but I see nobody shouting stop or offering any hope that people can continue to live in the place where they want to raise their family.

Then there is the first-world problem of continued Dublin domination. Of course it will end in its present form, but because the resources in terms of players, finance, coaching and management are vastly superior to everywhere else, any Dublin setback will be temporary.

This does not entitle counties to give up, but a proud county like Offaly is losing more than bogs and power stations. Up to 20 years ago Offaly could take on Dublin as equals. It is not going to happen again unless I'm reading the tea leaves wrongly. This is now a mini taking on a juggernaut.

The very obvious thing to do is to divide Dublin up into several different teams. That suggestion causes palpitations among the Dublin hierarchy who just want to let the good times roll. That recommendation was made more than 15 years ago by a committee of top brains in Croke Park but has been ignored by all those at central level since, and of course Dublin swept it under the carpet as fast as possible. There it remains, depriving hundreds of young Dublin footballers of playing underage for some Dublin team and ensuring great adult footballers are frozen out.

Would Dublin supporters warm to these divisions and turn out in numbers in Croke Park? Would there be more at Dublin Fingal versus Dublin South than Dublin against Wicklow or Wexford? Even Jim Gavin can't make that look exciting. The present Leinster Championship is a dead duck. It is not retrievable. Hoping that something will turn up is not a policy.

So the GAA trudges on. It will hardly die out anywhere, even in places where the population of young people continues to decline through temporary emigration or a permanent fall in numbers, often not assisted by local authority planning where the future in the eyes of planners seems to be about shoehorning everyone into towns instead of creating plenty of vibrant villages. Local pride dictates that some sort of a team takes the pitch, nobody wants to let the light go out on their watch. These are also the societal issues which threaten the GAA.

So this is where city and country collide. Dublin is one side of the coin and much of the midlands reflects the other. If somebody in authority is suggesting that Dublin county and clubs get bigger and stronger and rural Ireland decays then we have a serious problem. Because by doing nothing that is exactly the implication.

Soon, new rules will emerge which will attempt to tackle the drift towards repetitive handpassing in football which is boring supporters to the point where they are choosing not to watch games. That is a problem.

Much more urgent, though, is the silent destruction of the GAA where rural clubs are struggling to field teams and where there is a complete lack of competition at county level. This is a structural issue which must start with a debate on Dublin. If things are allowed to drift for another ten years then the GAA as a national movement will be a much lesser organisation. The success of Dublin as a county and the sheer scale of their clubs won't paper over those cracks. The original design of the GAA was one of a socialist mass movement. Now it has become elitist. I don't like the drift.

11
Anyone got an opinion on what O'Rourke has to say?
 Fire ahead...

12
General discussion / Re: The IRISH RUGBY thread
« on: November 18, 2018, 10:15:32 PM »
Am I wrong in thinking Rory Best is a weak link in that team?

Only in the minds of some Leinster and Munster people.

Cronin has some extra speed but his line outs last night prevented Ireland putting up quite a score on NZ.

Best is still the best option in terms of experience, all round game and leadership.  Look how many times he was into the ruck with O'Mahoney, how well he led the scrum and how he took the right decisions for the team.

When Sexton, he who would be captain, wanted to go again for the line out at the end of the first half, Best told him to take the score, impetuous Sexton wasn't pleased but those 3 points made it a two score game for a long time and made it more difficult for NZ.  That's what you get with Best, he may not be the best hooker but he brings much more to the team than Cronin, Scannell or Herring.

Fair play to Toner on last nights performance given being out of favour as first choice for a while.



I wouldn't know much about lineouts but it seemed to me that Cronin threw the ball exactly where he was supposed to for both lineouts that were lost. In both cases, NZ out-jumped the receiver, which wasn't happening when Toner and O'Mahony were on.

I don't know much about being a rugby captain either and leadership is an intangible concept, but Best seems to have it in abundance and more than his rivals for the hooker position. If it were not for that I'd say Cronin would be the first choice.

So by your own admission, you donít know much
???
Am I missing something?
I see nowt wrong with what Hardy observations here. Dunno about Cronin being first choice but the rest is spot on.

So if Best throws them heíd be throwing them to the right place?  And those in the line out donít catch them?

I donít think Ireland are great at line outs regardless of Toner or not. But Best isnít just there to do lineouts, but most of what you said is right, you donít know much  ;)
Geez, what am I to make of that? Best is also the pack leader and for anyone on the sideline, it can be difficult to know what goes on out on the field at times but Best fits the job description to a tee- he never goes up exhorting his colleagues and he leads from the front- all the time. Best certainly isn't just there to throw in the ball. He does an above average job at that and at every other facet of the game as well.
However, I don't see any point in nit picking or ballbagging either.
It was an historic win and let's just take it for what it's worth.

This was about Hardys post admitting he knew nothing lineouts etc... while at the same time giving an opinion on having Best on the team! Clearly more intelligent people on the sport (the manager) feel heís more important and a better player overall than the other replacements..

This is a result business and Ireland are number 2 beating the number 1 team if he was wrong and results went against him heíd know about it! Plus people with limited knowledge (like myself btw) will look at Best as the weak link!
Ah, I see what you mean now. Fair enough.

13
General discussion / Re: The IRISH RUGBY thread
« on: November 18, 2018, 08:28:00 PM »
Am I wrong in thinking Rory Best is a weak link in that team?

Only in the minds of some Leinster and Munster people.

Cronin has some extra speed but his line outs last night prevented Ireland putting up quite a score on NZ.

Best is still the best option in terms of experience, all round game and leadership.  Look how many times he was into the ruck with O'Mahoney, how well he led the scrum and how he took the right decisions for the team.

When Sexton, he who would be captain, wanted to go again for the line out at the end of the first half, Best told him to take the score, impetuous Sexton wasn't pleased but those 3 points made it a two score game for a long time and made it more difficult for NZ.  That's what you get with Best, he may not be the best hooker but he brings much more to the team than Cronin, Scannell or Herring.

Fair play to Toner on last nights performance given being out of favour as first choice for a while.



I wouldn't know much about lineouts but it seemed to me that Cronin threw the ball exactly where he was supposed to for both lineouts that were lost. In both cases, NZ out-jumped the receiver, which wasn't happening when Toner and O'Mahony were on.

I don't know much about being a rugby captain either and leadership is an intangible concept, but Best seems to have it in abundance and more than his rivals for the hooker position. If it were not for that I'd say Cronin would be the first choice.

So by your own admission, you donít know much
???
Am I missing something?
I see nowt wrong with what Hardy observations here. Dunno about Cronin being first choice but the rest is spot on.

So if Best throws them heíd be throwing them to the right place?  And those in the line out donít catch them?

I donít think Ireland are great at line outs regardless of Toner or not. But Best isnít just there to do lineouts, but most of what you said is right, you donít know much  ;)
Geez, what am I to make of that? Best is also the pack leader and for anyone on the sideline, it can be difficult to know what goes on out on the field at times but Best fits the job description to a tee- he never goes up exhorting his colleagues and he leads from the front- all the time. Best certainly isn't just there to throw in the ball. He does an above average job at that and at every other facet of the game as well.
However, I don't see any point in nit picking or ballbagging either.
It was an historic win and let's just take it for what it's worth.

14
General discussion / Re: The IRISH RUGBY thread
« on: November 18, 2018, 06:07:54 PM »
Am I wrong in thinking Rory Best is a weak link in that team?

Only in the minds of some Leinster and Munster people.

Cronin has some extra speed but his line outs last night prevented Ireland putting up quite a score on NZ.

Best is still the best option in terms of experience, all round game and leadership.  Look how many times he was into the ruck with O'Mahoney, how well he led the scrum and how he took the right decisions for the team.

When Sexton, he who would be captain, wanted to go again for the line out at the end of the first half, Best told him to take the score, impetuous Sexton wasn't pleased but those 3 points made it a two score game for a long time and made it more difficult for NZ.  That's what you get with Best, he may not be the best hooker but he brings much more to the team than Cronin, Scannell or Herring.

Fair play to Toner on last nights performance given being out of favour as first choice for a while.



I wouldn't know much about lineouts but it seemed to me that Cronin threw the ball exactly where he was supposed to for both lineouts that were lost. In both cases, NZ out-jumped the receiver, which wasn't happening when Toner and O'Mahony were on.

I don't know much about being a rugby captain either and leadership is an intangible concept, but Best seems to have it in abundance and more than his rivals for the hooker position. If it were not for that I'd say Cronin would be the first choice.

So by your own admission, you donít know much
???
Am I missing something?
I see nowt wrong with what Hardy observations here. Dunno about Cronin being first choice but the rest is spot on.

15
GAA Discussion / Re: Connacht Club Championships 2018
« on: November 11, 2018, 09:17:33 PM »
I expect Ballintubber to be beaten by Corofin by about 5 points!

Tubber will be lucky if they get away with only a five-point loss! When you think of the class players Tubber have and they are still massive underdogs, Corofin look good to go the whole way this year.
Back to back is tough
Well, cheering for heron-chokers is never easy but I hope they go the whole way.  ;D

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