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Messages - give her dixie

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1
General discussion / Re: Things that make you go What the F**k?
« on: April 24, 2015, 01:24:56 PM »

2
General discussion / Re: 100 Years ago today
« on: April 24, 2015, 10:27:25 AM »
I suspect the "new" Australians remember it because it was their first major loss of lives?
Mind you they'd been killing loads of the real Australians for over a Century at that stage.
As for Irish people who were killed in Gallipoli - why can it not just be maturely remembered as a historical fact rather than all the Brit "hero" stuff?

You will enjoy this read Rossfan

https://newmatilda.com/2015/04/22/gallipoli-could-never-define-australia-war-did

3
This is an interesting read on that day in 1979, and who was allegedly involved

http://www.onlinepublishingcompany.info/content/sitenewsreadmore/infobox/news/template/default/active_id/385

4
Gerry Adams said this at the time of Mountbattens death:

"What the IRA did to him is what Mountbatten had been doing all his life to other people; and with his war record I don't think he could have objected to dying in what was clearly a war situation. He knew the danger involved in coming to this country. In my opinion, the IRA achieved its objective: people started paying attention to what was happening in Ireland,"




5
General discussion / Re: The Palestine thread
« on: April 20, 2015, 08:52:56 PM »
New report documents Israel's attacks on children in Gaza

A leading international child's rights NGO has released a hard-hitting new report on "the high price paid by children" during Israel' assault on the Gaza Strip last year.

The report by Defense for Children International Palestine (DCIP), 'Operation Protective Edge: A War Waged on Children', deals with the verified deaths of 547 Palestinian children during Israel's assault, two-thirds of whom were 12 years old or younger.

DCIP says it found "overwhelming and repeated evidence that Israeli forces committed grave violations against children amounting to war crimes." This included the killing of 164 children by drone strikes.

In addition to the fatalities, more than 1,000 children "suffered injuries that rendered them permanently disabled."

The report documents numerous specific incidents, including the deaths of Rawya Joudeh, 40, and four of her five children (aged between 6 and 4), when an Israeli drone-fired missile struck as they played in the family's yard.

According to DCIP, just under half of the children who were killed in Gaza "lost their lives in aerial attacks on residential buildings."

The report states: "Missiles dropped by Israeli warplanes killed 225 children while they were in their own homes or seeking shelter, often as they sat down to eat with their families, played, or slept."

In six military offensives on the Gaza Strip since 2006, Israel has killed 1097 children, says DCIP. The NGO reiterates its call for the UN Secretary-General to "list" Israel's armed forces as part of the UN Security Council's children and armed conflict agenda.

Khaled Quzmar, general director of DCIP, commented: "The international community must demand an end to Israel's illegal blockade of Gaza and challenge systemic impunity by investigating allegations of war crimes and holding the perpetrators accountable."

https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/news/middle-east/18153-new-report-documents-israels-attacks-on-children-in-gaza

6
General discussion / Re: The Many Faces of US Politics...
« on: April 19, 2015, 11:30:03 AM »
There has been a big push over the past few years by Fundamentalist Christians to plant trees in the Negev desert in order
to fertilize the land for the 2nd coming of Christ. This is led by "God TV".........

Watch this short video and check out Rory Alec, the channel’s co-founder. He had begun fundraising for the forest after receiving
“an instruction from God” a few years ago. He said God had told him: “Prepare the land for the return of my Son.”


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dg8Y5y73M18

7
General discussion / Re: The Palestine thread
« on: April 14, 2015, 05:23:43 PM »
World not delivering on Gaza reconstruction promises, new report warns


Six months since donors pledged $3.5 billion towards Gaza's recovery, many people are worse off and not a single one of the 19,000 destroyed homes has been rebuilt. 100,000 people are still homeless and many are living in makeshift camps or schools.

The report, "Charting a New Course: Overcoming the stalemate in Gaza," warns that further conflict is inevitable - and with it the cycle of destruction and donor-funded reconstruction - unless world leaders implement a new approach that addresses the underlying causes of the conflict. Donors must insist on a permanent ceasefire, accountability of all parties for ongoing violations of international law, and an end to the Israeli blockade that seals in 1.8 million Palestinians in Gaza and keeps them separated from the West Bank. Rather than challenging the blockade, the report found that most donors are accepting ways to work around it.

Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of Oxfam, said: "The promising speeches at the donor conference have turned into empty words.There has been little rebuilding, no permanent ceasefire agreement and no plan to end the blockade.The international community is walking with eyes wide open into the next avoidable conflict, by upholding the status quo they themselves said must change."

William Bell of Christian Aid said: "We must ensure that this most recent and most devastating conflict was the last one. There must be consequences for continued violations. By facilitating a culture of impunity, the international community is committing itself to indefinitely picking up the pieces."

Only 26.8 percent of money pledged by donors six months ago has been released so far. Even when funded, many reconstruction projects have not yet begun due to restrictions on essential material under the blockade. Most of the 81 health clinics and hospitals that were damaged still lack funds for reconstruction, but the few that have funds do not have the material needed to proceed.

Tony Laurance, CEO of MAP UK, said: “The world is shutting its eyes and ears to the people of Gaza when they need it most. Reconstruction cannot happen without funds, but money alone will not be enough. With the blockade in place we are just reconstructing a life of misery, poverty and despair.”

Since the temporary ceasefire, violence against civilians has continued, with more than 400 incidents of Israeli fire into Gaza and four rockets fired from Gaza into Israel. The report calls on all parties to immediately resume long-term ceasefire negotiations. It calls on Israel to end its blockade and policy of separating Gaza from the West Bank, and for Palestinian political actors to reconcile and prioritize reconstruction. It also calls on Egypt to open its border to allow humanitarian relief.

Recently, donors have managed to achieve some small increase in the flow of construction material, but not enough to meet needs and its impact is extremely limited while the blockade remains in place. The report sets out specific recommendations to the international community to break the cycle of conflict and destruction, including ways to:

Speed up reconstruction, by delivering pledges and insisting on the entry of essential material in line with international law.
   
Ensure all parties are held accountable for violations of international law, including by considering obligations under the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) on weapons known to be used indiscriminately against civilians, and seeking compensation for destroyed aid projects.
   
End the blockade and rehabilitate Gaza's shattered economy. The blockade has reduced Gaza to dependency on aid, with 80 percent of the population receiving international assistance and 63 percent of youth unemployed. Exports from Gaza are at less than two percent of pre-blockade levels with the movement of people and goods between Gaza and the West Bank practically non-existent.

Support the development of a unified Palestinian government. Palestinian leadership on reconstruction has at times been weak and uncoordinated and is further complicated due to Israeli restrictions on government officials’ travel. Keeping Gaza separated from the West Bank has entrenched the already problematic split between Fatah and Hamas, with enormous negative impact on the delivery of aid and services in Gaza.

https://www.oxfam.org/en/pressroom/pressreleases/2015-04-13/world-not-delivering-gaza-reconstruction-promises-new-report

8
General discussion / Re: The Fine Gael thread
« on: April 06, 2015, 01:02:06 PM »
What an ignorant hate filled rant by that yoke Lynchboy. Thankfully he's on my ignore list but occasionally it's good to see the likes of him quoted to see his true colours.
Hope he never needs an ambulance or an emergency operation anyday soon ..... or maybe....
Why do people have to "stand up to the Unions".
Do ye yearn to go back to the 1930s again or what? I suppose some of ye shopped in Dunnes yesterday  :-[
I'm proud to say I joined one crew of picketers to support them for an hour.
Fair dues, Ross, you're on the money there. The  Dunne's dispute  is only the first of many that are coming down the line.   IT's the zero hour contracts and the minimum wage being the maximum wage in many quarters that is banjaxing  our economic recovery. 

Right now, you have an employers' market, lots less jobs than workers so unscrupulous employers are getting away with bloody blue murder. I know cases where workers, while being paid the minimum wage , are obliged to work extra hours without pay.  My son-in-law lives in Cavan. He got a job recently as a HGV driver and  was told the pay would be a straight  €350 into the hand.     

That was grand he thought until he found out that there would be no overtime, food or travelling allowances of any sort. So if his last run of the day takes him to Cork, say, he can either find accommodation there at his own expense or drive back to the yard in Dublin. Then he has to drive to Ballyconnell and be ready to return to the yard for 7.30 next morning. HIs boss told him to take it or leave it, there was a long queue waiting to take his place. He's by no means an exception to the general rule.

Given that there are lots of Irish workers who are unemployed due t the recession and there are even more non-nationals in competition for whatever work is going, hands a clear advantage to the employers.  Most of those who arrive here are desperate for work, any work and unsure of their legal rights so exploiting them is a relatively simple matter.

It's something Irish people have had plenty of experience of but there's a twist to the story in this case as the Irish were the exploited workers arriving in foreign places in the 60s and again in the 80s.

I'd go after the employers before I'd have a go at the public service personnel. For one thing, the majority of public service people are not particularly well-paid. The Croke Park Deal, followed by the Haddington Road Agreement saw to this.

Stick to yer guns, Ross and double damn the begrudgers! ;D




(Ps Good luck tomorrow.)

2 great posts folks.

I saw Christy Moore last night in Carrickmacross and he dedicated his 80's song Dunnes Stores to the workers striking on Thursday.
Fair play to him for continually sticking up for the average worker.

As a HGV driver, we are currently been screwed by our employers as they once paid us a decent wage due to the hours we worked
and the sacrifices we made for been away from home for long periods of time. Now they have the luxury of a EU work force and instead of wages going up, they have gone down. We earn less today than we did 20 years ago.

I don't blame the people filling the jobs, but rather the bosses who instead of looking to the long term, look to the short term
and ignore the reality that due to low wages we are not recruiting young people into the profession.

A quick look at HGV drivers on the road shows that hardly anyone under the age of 40 is entering the profession.

One thing the recession has taught us is that wages will remain low and anyone questioning the status quo will be easily replaced

Dunnes Stores by Christy Moore 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TER_M3KNVCE

One of the main problems with this country is that the govt are putting the interests of large corporations ahead of the interests of small and medium sized local businesses. They are also putting the interest of these corporations ahead of the country's citizens. Their refusal to tackle upwards only rent which is crippling local businesses along with their refusal to ensure Multi Nationals pay the extremely generous rate of 12.5% shows where their loyalties lie.

While you are on lower wages than you were 20 years ago and many have taken massive cuts over the last 7 years there are a few who have remained relatively untouched. These people are the same people who are making the decisions to hammer the same people over and over.

You will find the people who have little problem paying for all these new taxes are the people who have remained relatively untouched by the recession. They can afford it and attack those who cannot afford it by calling them the "we won't pay brigade" and lable them as "thugs" when they go out and protest.

Unions have been complicit in this by ensuring new entrants to the public service are earning far less than those lucky enough to be already there. A typical "I'm alright Jack" approach which is similar to those defending new taxes on this board. Their laughable attempts at trying to sympathise with the working class who are on minimum wage and work under conditions described above is cringeworthy.

A better way to improve the economy would be to bring public sector salaries more in line with the economic conditions we are in. They are not sustainable at their current rate. This obviously won't happen as it would be the right thing to do but no one has the bottle to tackle it. Instead they continue to hammer the same people over and over and over.

Indeed. Currently here in the North our politicians, driven by Sinn Fein and the DUP, are cutting 20,000 Public sector jobs
in order to cut Corporation tax from 21% to 12.5%. Who does this tax break help? It sure isn't the ordinary worker.

Only a few weeks ago, Gerry Adams was visited by US donors and business reps. He had this to say

"We are very good for business, we are pro-business."

"We can't be getting support from US businesses on the one hand and then be bad for business on the other."

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/sinn-fein-is-good-for-business-adams-reassures-america-31047877.html

While big companies fund our political parties, it is us the average Joe who vote for them. It is us they should answer to, not the global corporate elite who fund them. As the saying goes, He who pays the piper calls the tune.


9
General discussion / Re: The Fine Gael thread
« on: April 06, 2015, 01:44:56 AM »
What an ignorant hate filled rant by that yoke Lynchboy. Thankfully he's on my ignore list but occasionally it's good to see the likes of him quoted to see his true colours.
Hope he never needs an ambulance or an emergency operation anyday soon ..... or maybe....
Why do people have to "stand up to the Unions".
Do ye yearn to go back to the 1930s again or what? I suppose some of ye shopped in Dunnes yesterday  :-[
I'm proud to say I joined one crew of picketers to support them for an hour.
Fair dues, Ross, you're on the money there. The  Dunne's dispute  is only the first of many that are coming down the line.   IT's the zero hour contracts and the minimum wage being the maximum wage in many quarters that is banjaxing  our economic recovery. 

Right now, you have an employers' market, lots less jobs than workers so unscrupulous employers are getting away with bloody blue murder. I know cases where workers, while being paid the minimum wage , are obliged to work extra hours without pay.  My son-in-law lives in Cavan. He got a job recently as a HGV driver and  was told the pay would be a straight  €350 into the hand.     

That was grand he thought until he found out that there would be no overtime, food or travelling allowances of any sort. So if his last run of the day takes him to Cork, say, he can either find accommodation there at his own expense or drive back to the yard in Dublin. Then he has to drive to Ballyconnell and be ready to return to the yard for 7.30 next morning. HIs boss told him to take it or leave it, there was a long queue waiting to take his place. He's by no means an exception to the general rule.

Given that there are lots of Irish workers who are unemployed due t the recession and there are even more non-nationals in competition for whatever work is going, hands a clear advantage to the employers.  Most of those who arrive here are desperate for work, any work and unsure of their legal rights so exploiting them is a relatively simple matter.

It's something Irish people have had plenty of experience of but there's a twist to the story in this case as the Irish were the exploited workers arriving in foreign places in the 60s and again in the 80s.

I'd go after the employers before I'd have a go at the public service personnel. For one thing, the majority of public service people are not particularly well-paid. The Croke Park Deal, followed by the Haddington Road Agreement saw to this.

Stick to yer guns, Ross and double damn the begrudgers! ;D




(Ps Good luck tomorrow.)

2 great posts folks.

I saw Christy Moore last night in Carrickmacross and he dedicated his 80's song Dunnes Stores to the workers striking on Thursday.
Fair play to him for continually sticking up for the average worker.

As a HGV driver, we are currently been screwed by our employers as they once paid us a decent wage due to the hours we worked
and the sacrifices we made for been away from home for long periods of time. Now they have the luxury of a EU work force and instead of wages going up, they have gone down. We earn less today than we did 20 years ago.

I don't blame the people filling the jobs, but rather the bosses who instead of looking to the long term, look to the short term
and ignore the reality that due to low wages we are not recruiting young people into the profession.

A quick look at HGV drivers on the road shows that hardly anyone under the age of 40 is entering the profession.

One thing the recession has taught us is that wages will remain low and anyone questioning the status quo will be easily replaced

Dunnes Stores by Christy Moore 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TER_M3KNVCE
 

10
General discussion / Re: Rory McIlroy
« on: March 27, 2015, 07:13:04 PM »
If he ever visits Carlow he might reconsider.

There's a  good chance Foxcommander that he thought he was to be based in Monte Carlo

11
General discussion / Re: Rory McIlroy
« on: March 27, 2015, 06:49:04 PM »
Rory McIroy will pay tax to Dublin government rather than HMRC

Northern Ireland is set to miss the cut as golfer Rory McIlroy prepares to swing most of his global business operations to Dublin.

The decision will mean a significant boost to the Irish Exchequer as the golfer will pay normal company tax at 12.5% on his royalty fees — which are expected to amount to hundreds of millions of euro over his career.

It is understood that the Co Down native, currently the world’s top golfer, will file documents to create a new company known as Rory McIlroy Inc with the Companies Registration Office in Carlow today.

The new company, headed by Donal Casey, will manage all the royalty payments from the golf star’s various endorsements for Nike sportswear, Omega watches and most recently computer games.

The 25-year-old lives and works in many countries, and could have followed the usual route of creating a complex structure that would have located his management company in the United States while protecting his wealth with tax havens such as the Virgin Islands or Bermuda.

Instead, he has decided to locate everything to do with his brand and intellectual property in the Republic.

Prize money and other earnings won’t flow to the Irish company because they tend to be treated as income, and taxed accordingly by the country where the championship was won. However, he will only pay 12.5% in business taxes in the Republic, compared to 21% in Northern Ireland.

Yesterday, the power to set the rate of corporation tax in Northern Ireland received Royal Assent from the Queen — although it will be at least two years before it changes. It also relies heavily on Stormont’s ability to overcome the welfare reform impasse and get its finances in order.

Eamonn Donaghy, head of tax at KPMG Belfast, said  Northern Ireland now needs “a date and a rate” for corporation tax to attract potential investors such as McIlroy. “Until there is the certainty over the tax rate and whether it will take effect on April 1, 2017, then people are going to make a decision,” he said

Mr Donaghy, who is also spokesman for Grow NI, the campaign to devolve corporation tax-varying powers, said a big push for transparency around the world meant tax havens were no longer in as much demand as companies tried to improve their image. Many companies are now looking for EU countries with stable tax regimes with low business tax rates.

“Rory may have come to Northern Ireland, but we really need a date and a rate to attract big businesses like Rory McIlroy Inc,” he added. McIlroy ended his relationship with his previous management company Horizon Sports Management following a sometimes bitter legal action.
advertisement

While McIllroy’s new company draws income from endorsements all over the world, it is relatively small. It employs just six people in management and a further four people in administration.

It also uses many experts in the Republic such as accountancy firm BDO and top advertising agency Rothco.

Sports management has been around for decades, but McIllroy is undoubtedly the first Northern Irish sportsman with the potential to become a billionaire. With 2.5 million followers on Twitter, he has an enormous fan base which means he can attract lucrative sponsorship from companies that would not look at other sportsmen.

The Holywood native is the third-highest paid golfer at present and made $49m (£33m) last year, according to Golf Digest. About $35m (£24m) of that came from earnings off the course, including a sponsorship deal with Nike.

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/uk/rory-mciroy-will-pay-tax-to-dublin-government-rather-than-hmrc-31097954.html

12
General discussion / Re: The Haas Talks
« on: March 24, 2015, 06:24:53 PM »
Yet another hearty bowl of soup dished out by the Establishment and consumed by the top level once again.

Nothing the shinners do surprises me anymore. It's only a matter of time until they take their seats at Westminster.
After all, they take every benefit going with the role and Martin McGuinness never wastes an opportunity to praise the Queen.

And Gerry and co have no problem calling people opposed to the occupation as "So called republicans".
Maybe they should look in the mirror the next time they use this phrase.

13
General discussion / Re: The IRISH RUGBY thread
« on: March 21, 2015, 10:58:11 PM »
I wouldn't normally watch a lot of rugby but today I couldn't leave the couch as 3 incredible matches were
played out. Great games and some fantastic scores. Well done Ireland as they did enough to claim the championship

14
General discussion / Re: Sinn Fein? They have gone away, you know.
« on: March 18, 2015, 02:34:46 AM »
I see Martina Anderson and co are in Tel Aviv. No doubt checking out how their friend Issac Herzog is doing in the election.  Of course it will be spun that they are there to go to Gaza. ....

15
General discussion / Re: Sinn Fein? They have gone away, you know.
« on: March 14, 2015, 12:53:41 AM »
You have to admire the brass neck of SF standing on picket lines with workers who are protesting against SF's budget.  ::)

George Orwell couldn't write the script.

Sure they would show up for the opening of an envelope if they thought they would have their picture taken.

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