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Messages - Jim_Murphy_74

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31
There are GAA guidelines for Child protection:

http://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/child-welfare-and-protection/

If a club, member or GAAboard contributor doesn't agree with them they should work to get them changed.  However, no of these parties can decide that any particular guideline is not important ("A few fcuks never hurt anyone", "my club does X").  Once they get away with that then all guidelines are up for arbitrary dismissal by an individual or club.

These are are hard-learnt issues in Ireland.  That is why this is a hugely serious issue.

/Jim.



32
Well Michael would recount that wouldn’t he?
He came out of this , very badly , showing a complete absence of respect and understanding for those in NI who clearly affiliate with the ROI team.
On behalf of the IFA , and for his own benefit, he champions this nonsense of FAI not being allowed to “target” players who want to play for them. Michael O’Neill chose to play for NI and clearly has an affinity with them.

In fairness to Michael O'Neill the exact point he asked was that the Republic not do the paperwork to formally transfer the player until they go to select them.  You only get a chance to apply to change once.  He made the point that at least one player who would have played for the North and out of the picture with the Republic, couldn't because he had already signed.

He acknowledged the right of Nationalists to play for the Republic but rightly identified a small group of players left isolated.  Given his small player base he had every right as a manager to try and work it out.

He was pretty hamfisted in his approach and jibing the FAI/Martin O'Neill wasn't going to get him a sympathetic hearing.  However, if one neutralizes the emotional response about nationality, he has a fair request.

/Jim.
 

33
General discussion / Re: New Car Advice
« on: April 27, 2018, 03:39:29 PM »
In the process of buying a Kia Optima (17 car, ex-demo).

Any experience of them, it's a 1.7 Diesel manual.

/Jim.

A mate had one as a company car, he loved it. Said it was one of the best cars he ever drove.

I am driving it now for 2 weeks and I find it a lovely car.  Very comfortable, good kit and plenty of pep.  A bit early to judge economy but seems good with a mix of rural and motorway driving.

It's my first experience of a Korean make and so far I am impressed.

/Jim.

Kia 7 yr warranty Jim?

7 years or 150 Kilometres (In the Free State we remain under the jackboot of EU oppression) which ever comes first.

I bought at 2017 car so 6 years remaining.

/Jim.

34
General discussion / Re: New Car Advice
« on: April 27, 2018, 01:17:47 PM »
In the process of buying a Kia Optima (17 car, ex-demo).

Any experience of them, it's a 1.7 Diesel manual.

/Jim.

A mate had one as a company car, he loved it. Said it was one of the best cars he ever drove.

I am driving it now for 2 weeks and I find it a lovely car.  Very comfortable, good kit and plenty of pep.  A bit early to judge economy but seems good with a mix of rural and motorway driving.

It's my first experience of a Korean make and so far I am impressed.

/Jim.


35
General discussion / Re: Car Problems!!
« on: April 26, 2018, 02:02:48 PM »
Have done that at the weekend twice. Went up and down the motorway on friday night and sunday.

I'm no expert but a word of warning that you should check error code first.   A lad at work had a Skoda showing similar issues.  He presumed EGR was at fault and did the hard driving trick.  Turned out car was going into limp mode because the turbo had broken.  Hard driving caused a piece of turbo to drive into engine and things went downhill quick.

/Jim.

36
General discussion / Re: Biggest Sh*thole in Ireland (2018 Edition)
« on: April 17, 2018, 12:38:01 PM »
Roscommon's biggest kip = Ballinlough.

Surely the presence of the Black Donkey Brewery raises it a little?

/Jim.

37
General discussion / Re: New Car Advice
« on: April 10, 2018, 12:55:54 PM »
In the process of buying a Kia Optima (17 car, ex-demo).

Any experience of them, it's a 1.7 Diesel manual.

/Jim.

A mate had one as a company car, he loved it. Said it was one of the best cars he ever drove.

I had one for a couple of months as a courtesy car, great to drive but the one they gave me was a hybrid was a nightmare, only last extremely expensive on juice once the 28 miles it did on electric ran out.

Had a look at PHEV models on web but I live out in the sticks so didn't see any advantage.  I am free state based so VRT would have been low but mostly I would be using hybrid and reports weren't great on it.

Gone ahead with diesel one this morning. 

/Jim.

38
General discussion / Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« on: April 10, 2018, 11:01:51 AM »
Well, the reason for Norn Iron existing was to contain a unionist majority. If there's a result of 50.01% in favour of a UI, there is no longer a unionist majority, and therefore Norn Iron ceases to exist.

I'd say some lunatics would call for a boundary commission and look to make a smaller state.  They have a long way to go to Gibraltar size (6.8km2)

/Jim.

39
General discussion / Re: New Car Advice
« on: April 10, 2018, 10:59:46 AM »
In the process of buying a Kia Optima (17 car, ex-demo).

Any experience of them, it's a 1.7 Diesel manual.

/Jim.

40
General discussion / Re: A United Ireland. Opening up the discussion.
« on: April 10, 2018, 10:57:20 AM »
So Bertie Ahearn after saying on Newsnight that a border poll which throws up a 52-48 majority for a United Ireland would not be good enough.  What does he want, 60-40, 70-30 or the best of three ... when democracy is no longer democracy.

Was he a good man for the gambling (All that sterling he won on a horse)?  I'd raise his to 53-47 and see if he blinks.

/Jim.

41
General discussion / Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« on: April 10, 2018, 12:46:02 AM »
Do you agree that the newly created Catholic state was a very cold house for Protestants? 

There was no need for forced removal or ethnic cleansing to move most Protestants out of the new state if they weren't prepared to fully integrate into the Catholic population.

Undoubtedly it was and it contributed to decline in Protestant population.   However, the current Irish Republic bears no resemblance to the past Free State.   A future, hypothetical, All-Ireland State would be different again.  The reality is based on current trends the average DUPer would find their views of issues like gay marriage, trusting Muslims to go the shops, etc.. as more of an issue than being Protestant.  In fact I would go as far as to say that they would find the secular, as against Catholic aspects more discomforting.

Frankly from my point of view, the Republic of Ireland is more alike the wider UK than Northern Ireland and I can't help the feeling that Arlene fears being part of a minority as much as anything else.

/Jim.

Why do you think that? Because the DUP are against gay marriage and abortion, and blocking an Irish Language Act?

To an extent, yes. These you are more likely to lose out on a position for coming out with Paisley type comments  about gays repulsing you than what religion you practice. Also I have heard some unionist politicians extolling the diversity of the UK, yet use their majority to rule against (in my eyes) said diversity.

/Jim

But a couple of dozen loons in the DUP don't speak for all unionists in the north (even though they vote for them), never mind everyone in the North. They certainly don't speak for me. Nor do SF, but that's another matter. You can't tar everyone in the North (unionists and nationalists) with the DUP brush.

By the way, gays may repulse countless others in the North and in Britain. You just don't hear them say it. Only the DUP have the bravery/stupidity to say it.

Excellent post.  DUP in aprticular do not speak for younger Protestants.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/aug/04/northern-irish-unionist-parties-alienating-young-protestants-study

Many also only vote for them due to polarised nature of politics in NI.  I would rather put pins in my eyes.

Whatever their reasoning the majority of unionists give them a mandate to speak for them.

/Jiim.

42
General discussion / Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« on: April 10, 2018, 12:43:41 AM »
Do you agree that the newly created Catholic state was a very cold house for Protestants? 

There was no need for forced removal or ethnic cleansing to move most Protestants out of the new state if they weren't prepared to fully integrate into the Catholic population.

Undoubtedly it was and it contributed to decline in Protestant population.   However, the current Irish Republic bears no resemblance to the past Free State.   A future, hypothetical, All-Ireland State would be different again.  The reality is based on current trends the average DUPer would find their views of issues like gay marriage, trusting Muslims to go the shops, etc.. as more of an issue than being Protestant.  In fact I would go as far as to say that they would find the secular, as against Catholic aspects more discomforting.

Frankly from my point of view, the Republic of Ireland is more alike the wider UK than Northern Ireland and I can't help the feeling that Arlene fears being part of a minority as much as anything else.

/Jim.

Why do you think that? Because the DUP are against gay marriage and abortion, and blocking an Irish Language Act?

To an extent, yes. These you are more likely to lose out on a position for coming out with Paisley type comments  about gays repulsing you than what religion you practice. Also I have heard some unionist politicians extolling the diversity of the UK, yet use their majority to rule against (in my eyes) said diversity.

/Jim

But a couple of dozen loons in the DUP don't speak for all unionists in the north (even though they vote for them), never mind everyone in the North. They certainly don't speak for me. Nor do SF, but that's another matter. You can't tar everyone in the North (unionists and nationalists) with the DUP brush.

By the way, gays may repulse countless others in the North and in Britain. You just don't hear them say it. Only the DUP have the bravery/stupidity to say it.

I am not tarring all unionists or northerners with any brush. I am referring to the likes of Arlene who would feel compelled to emigrate in the event of a United Ireland. I  questioning the relationship reasons she (and they) would have for this.

/Jim.

43
General discussion / Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« on: April 09, 2018, 09:32:56 PM »
Do you agree that the newly created Catholic state was a very cold house for Protestants? 

There was no need for forced removal or ethnic cleansing to move most Protestants out of the new state if they weren't prepared to fully integrate into the Catholic population.

Undoubtedly it was and it contributed to decline in Protestant population.   However, the current Irish Republic bears no resemblance to the past Free State.   A future, hypothetical, All-Ireland State would be different again.  The reality is based on current trends the average DUPer would find their views of issues like gay marriage, trusting Muslims to go the shops, etc.. as more of an issue than being Protestant.  In fact I would go as far as to say that they would find the secular, as against Catholic aspects more discomforting.

Frankly from my point of view, the Republic of Ireland is more alike the wider UK than Northern Ireland and I can't help the feeling that Arlene fears being part of a minority as much as anything else.

/Jim.

Why do you think that? Because the DUP are against gay marriage and abortion, and blocking an Irish Language Act?

To an extent, yes. These you are more likely to lose out on a position for coming out with Paisley type comments  about gays repulsing you than what religion you practice. Also I have heard some unionist politicians extolling the diversity of the UK, yet use their majority to rule against (in my eyes) said diversity.

/Jim

44
General discussion / Re: Arlene's bigotry shines through
« on: April 09, 2018, 09:01:38 AM »
Do you agree that the newly created Catholic state was a very cold house for Protestants? 

There was no need for forced removal or ethnic cleansing to move most Protestants out of the new state if they weren't prepared to fully integrate into the Catholic population.

Undoubtedly it was and it contributed to decline in Protestant population.   However, the current Irish Republic bears no resemblance to the past Free State.   A future, hypothetical, All-Ireland State would be different again.  The reality is based on current trends the average DUPer would find their views of issues like gay marriage, trusting Muslims to go the shops, etc.. as more of an issue than being Protestant.  In fact I would go as far as to say that they would find the secular, as against Catholic aspects more discomforting.

Frankly from my point of view, the Republic of Ireland is more alike the wider UK than Northern Ireland and I can't help the feeling that Arlene fears being part of a minority as much as anything else.

/Jim.



45
General discussion / Re: Ian Óg Twitter storm
« on: April 04, 2018, 04:53:44 PM »
No to anti semitism


That's because Ulster Protestants are actually one of the Lost Tribes of Israel so there is a connection and empathy there.

Nelson McCausland knows all about it.

/Jim.

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