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Messages - Ball Hopper

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1
GAA Discussion / Re: Munster Minor Football 2019 - New Format
« on: May 23, 2019, 11:44:43 PM »
Result from tonight:  Kerry 1-16 Clare 0-11 (half time 1-8 to 0-3)

Final will be Cork v Kerry
A month wait to the final and then another month before the All Ireland quarter finals. Can they not schedule fixtures a little better in Munster?

Leaving Cert in the meantime.

I thought that was to become less of problem since minor became U17?

Thought the same...no explanation for the month between Munster final and AI Quarter final though.  The tradition of having the minor final as curtain raiser for the senior final in Munster is all I can come up with. 

Makes more sense to play the U20 final with the senior final maybe?

2
GAA Discussion / Re: Munster Minor Football 2019 - New Format
« on: May 23, 2019, 09:46:45 PM »
Result from tonight:  Kerry 1-16 Clare 0-11 (half time 1-8 to 0-3)

Final will be Cork v Kerry
A month wait to the final and then another month before the All Ireland quarter finals. Can they not schedule fixtures a little better in Munster?

Leaving Cert in the meantime.

3
GAA Discussion / Re: Munster Minor Football 2019 - New Format
« on: May 23, 2019, 09:03:03 PM »
Result from tonight:  Kerry 1-16 Clare 0-11 (half time 1-8 to 0-3)

Final will be Cork v Kerry

4
GAA Discussion / Re: Football qualifier route 2019
« on: May 22, 2019, 07:38:30 PM »
Hurling will use penalties as well.

5
GAA Discussion / Re: Football qualifier route 2019
« on: May 22, 2019, 02:58:03 PM »
A big difference in the penalty shoot-out is what happens if level after 5 penalties taken by each team.  The GAA way will be to have the same 5 penalty takers take the sudden death penalties, although they can be in a different order.

Also, only the 5 penalty takers can be on the pitch from a team - all other players (including a sub keeper), managers, maor foirne, maor uisce, physios and so on must be in their team's sideline area.  I presume linesmen will be tasked with keeping them in place.  Will be interesting if a penalty taker starts to suffer from cramp and cannot receive attention.

I predict chaos and the local radio commentaries could be eventful as well.

6
GAA Discussion / Re: Football qualifier route 2019
« on: May 22, 2019, 02:29:58 PM »
A open draw to take place this Monday the 27th of May

16 teams in round 1

Leitrim
Monaghan
Down
Derry
Antrim or Tyrone
Fermanagh or Donegal
Tipperary
Waterford
Offaly
Wexford
Louth or Dublin
Longford or Kildare
Carlow or Meath
Laois v Westmeath
London
Wicklow

Games to be played June 8th.


Round 2

Eight round 1 winners v the eight beaten provincial finalists (draw takes place June 10th)

Games to be played June 22nd


Round 3

Draw between the eight winners (draw takes place June 24th)

Games to be played June 29th

Round 4

Four beaten provincial finalists v the four round 4 winners (draw takes place July 1st)

Game to be played July 6th or 7th



- Every match in the qualifiers is a winner on the day. Extra time and a penalty competition if required.

- Draws are subject to repeat pairings 

- Div 3,4 teams will get home advantage in round 1, 2 and 3 if drawn against a Div 1 or 2 team.

- Round 4 games played in neutral venues

- Home venues shall be subject to approval by the CCCC and shall meet the criteria set down by the  national health and safety committee (brought in this year to make sure HQ aren't embarrassed by another Newbridge or no where scenario)

Correction:

Round 2

Eight round 1 winners v the eight beaten provincial semi-finalists (draw takes place June 10th)

Games to be played June 22nd

7
Hurling Discussion / Re: Hurling Championship 2019
« on: May 21, 2019, 10:02:00 PM »
Odds I found today, 21 May:

Tipp 11/4

Cork Galway Limerick all 9/2

Kilkenny 5/1

Clare 13/2

Wexford 20/1

Dublin 33/1

8
GAA Discussion / Re: Anton O’Toole RIP
« on: May 17, 2019, 07:10:02 PM »
RIP, Anton.

This is From "Return To The Hill: The Remarkable Story Of Heffo's Heroes"  By David Walsh.   Dated January 1989

10. Anton O’Toole.

The character of the Dublin team had its source in Heffernan. Through him it permeated into the team. Hanahoe, Doherty, Keaveney, Mullins, O'Neill and O'Driscoll were dedicated disciples. In their approach to sport, they felt as Heffernan did. Hard, unromantic, without a thought for the opposition. You did it not for the Hill, or the glory but for yourself.

There were a few in the team who did not perfectly reflect the group ethic. Anton O'Toole was one of those. Tall, almost ungainly; O'Toole gives the impression that he could have taken it or left it.

Heffernan's approach was full of psychology, constant analyses and occasional intrigue. O'Toole would have taken a less complex view and wondered what, in God's name, intrigue had to do with football. During the team discussions he listened and ventured forth with his view only when convinced that some- thing needed to be said. Now and then he would disagree with Heffernan, dismissing something the manager had said as "a load of rubbish".

When Heffernan tried to find the basis for O'Toole's objection he was as often as not disappointed. Anton's was not to reason why but to trust a reliable instinct. On the pitch he got on with the game, allowing his left foot to do the talking. Opponents knew O'Toole had only the left but it did not mean they could stop him.

His performance in the 1977 semi final persuaded Mick O'Dwyer that Ger Power's future could not be at wing back. O'Toole was there when the ship went on the rocks in '78 and '79 and present when it fragmented in 1981. That afternoon Dublin lost to Laois. His best pals in the team were Hickey and McCarthy. After that loss they agreed it was unlikely they would ever play in the same Dublin side again.

Then 31, O'Toole would not have complained if he had been banished by Heffernan. For him the music had died. There would never be anything like the seventies and he had little zest for life without the lads.

He did retire but Heffernan knew that his kind of football talent did not age in the way others' did. The second coming of Anton O'Toole in '83 and '84 presented a different talent: a thoughtful full forward appeared where once there was a hard running wing forward. Only one with O'Toole's unusual gifts could have succeeded in both roles.

He was left with a career that saw him play in eight All Ireland finals. Four times a winner, four times beaten. Only Mullins and he played in the four winning Dublin teams. But the medal he claimed in 1983 did not mean as much as the other three: "I don't mean any disrespect to the guys in 1983 but that medal does not compare with the others. I knew I was capable of performing in 1983 but I did not want to.

"I did not, could not, have the same rapport with the new group. I really don't know why I came back. I certainly would not have if it were not for the fact that Tommy Drumm was still there. It goes without saying but the seventies team was a special group. Even the guys of '74 who did not make it in '76 and '77. Fellows like Paddy Reilly and Georgie Wilson. Reilly was so witty, Wilson so incredibly funny. Guys like them and Paddy Cullen. Nobody was made for stardom like them."

Donal Colfer, a selector from 1973 to '86, would have been the first to see the footballer in O'Toole. Colfer and O'Toole were both Synge Street men and it was with the successful Synge Street team of 1970 and '71 that O'Toole showed he could be some- thing. He had been small and slightly built as a teenager, unable to win his place on the U-17 team at Synge Street college. At 18 he was ready to grow.

O'Toole was in the Dublin panel in 1972 and on the team a year later. Heck, it was not such a big deal. There was a match against Cork in the spring of '73, at a time when Cork were very good and Dublin did not know what they were about. It suggested to O'Toole he should quit, there and then: "If I touched the ball twice in the game that was it. I stood there, a Dublin wing forward, saying to myself what are you doing here?' That evening I was walking up Camden Street on my way home and I had decided I would give it up." Later that year O'Toole went to watch Galway and Offaly in and All Ire-land semi-final and left with the impression he was as good as the players he had seen that day.

When O'Toole saw Keaveney back at training for the second round of the championship in 1974 he despaired: "I saw him coming into Parnell Park and he was not in good shape. It was usual for Dublin to bring back a former great if they won a match. David Hickey was also brought back and I was annoyed. They were two forwards and two fellows who played in the league were going to lose out. If there was a feeling growing in the early rounds of the '74 championship that we were on to something I certainly was not aware of it.

When I saw the two lads coming back the feeling I had was 'Here we go, again'," But O'Toole's scepticism was easily dissipated. Keaveney's first test came against Louth in the championship and when he kicked a sideline over the bar, O'Toole could see the point in having him there. Hickey, too, earned respect:
"His performance in the All Ireland semi-final of 1974 was the greatest display of wing forward play I have ever seen. He was marked by Kevin Jer O'Sullivan who was very highly regarded but Hickey won that game for us. Beating Cork in that game convinced me we would win the All Ireland and in some ways it was the most important victory of all.

Afterwards there was the sudden realization that you could achieve something. Beforehand it had been a dream, then it was your destiny." O'Toole grew to love the Dublin scene. On the Hill, they loved him too. The Blue Panther. Anton would have liked that. Training was hard but it never bothered him. He had boundless stamina and, anyway, the Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday routine in Parnell Park was as much social as sporting event: “I was very aware at the time that of the relationship that existed. Sure success helped the spirit but there were guys who might not have hit it off outside the football team who enjoyed a very special relationship inside it.

O'Toole's way within the group was modest, maybe even unassertive. He was never going to become a captain of industry, He began working with Cement Limited after school and stayed with them when the link up with Roadstone took place in 1973. Having started as a clerk in the office O'Toole worked his way forward and into computer operations.

Fame with Dublin tempted O'Toole to go on the road in 1979. Cullen, O'Driscoll, Doyle and Keaveney had all done well on the road but Anton was to be the exception: "I just did not like it. You ended up chasing people for money and it seemed to me that there had to be more to life than this. I gladly went back to the computers."

Three years ago he joined Guinness as a computer systems developer and has been there since: "I look after certain systems in the company and if a new system were needed 1 would be involved in developing it. There used to be a certain mystique about computers, not any more." Steady, well paid employment, O'Toole was always likely to make out. He remains the only unmarried member of the great team. Some of his team mates have been known to express envy?: "I suppose how they feel would depend upon their experiences."

O'Toole looks back and reckons he would have been good at rugby. All the running, dummying and jinking would have suited him. He played hockey and really enjoyed it, some badminton. But his yearning to be competitive was fully satisfied by the Dublin football team. He now spends Saturday mornings coaching football to nine and ten year olds at Synge Street and has no wish to climb the coaching ladder.

About Anton O'Toole there is a sense of a man who, because of circumstances, had to forfeit his sporting innocence. When he first went to watch Kevin Moran play soccer for Ireland he was disappointed: "I had expected to see him take the ball inside his own half and go sallying up the field, like he used to do for Dublin. But the exuberance was not there. I suppose it could not be."

9
GAA Discussion / Re: Munster Minor Football 2019 - New Format
« on: May 15, 2019, 09:23:29 PM »
Result:  Cork 3-9 Clare 0-14

10
General discussion / Re: European Leagues.
« on: May 10, 2019, 01:08:58 AM »
Play both finals in Croke Park, on consecutive Saturdays.

11
GAA Discussion / Re: Munster Minor Football 2019 - New Format
« on: May 09, 2019, 03:41:39 AM »
Phase 1 final:  Clare 3-12 Tipperary 0-6.

Upcoming fixtures:

15 May Clare v Cork

23 May Kerry v Clare

22 June Final:  Top 2 in Phase group of 3 teams. 

If Clare beat Cork next week, the Kerry/Clare game is a dead rubber as both teams are already in the final.

12
GAA Discussion / Re: Munster Minor Football 2019 - New Format
« on: May 07, 2019, 08:32:06 PM »
Phase 2


Streaky scoring bursts in this game. Kerry go 0-6 to 0-1 up after only 9 minutes. Cork bring it back to 0-7 apiece after 22 minutes.

Kerry get the next 4 points and Cork get a point on the stroke of half time to leave Kerry ahead 0-11 to 0-8 at the short whistle.

Second half opens with a Cork goal to level things, but Kerry have run their total to 3-18 by the time Cork get their next point with five minutes left.

Final score: Kerry 3-19 Cork 1-9


13
GAA Discussion / Re: Kerry Championship system
« on: May 05, 2019, 06:50:37 PM »
Kerry Club Championships finished today.

Senior winners: Austin Stacks (Div 1)

Intermediate winners: Templenoe (Div 1) Relegated: Brosna (Div 2)

Premier Junior winners: Na Gaeil (Div 1) Relegated Lispole (Div 3)

Junior winners: Ballyduff (Div 5)

The only fixture remaining is the Senior Relegation Final between Rathmore and Kilcummin.  This will not be played until the County Championship is in the later stages as a Club that makes the County Final cannot be relegated from Senior ranks.




14
GAA Discussion / Re: Munster Minor Football 2019 - New Format
« on: April 25, 2019, 01:41:52 AM »
Phase 1, Rd 3 results:

Tipperary 0-10 Limerick 0-10

Waterford 2-7 Clare 1-9

Final table has Clare on 4 points, Tipperary and Waterford have 3 each and Limerick have 2 points.  Since Tipperary beat Waterford 4-13 to 0-7 in Rd 1, they meet Clare in the Phase 1 final on 7 May.

Also on 7 May is the first game of Phase 2, Cork v Kerry in Pairc Ui Rinn.

15
General discussion / Re: The OFFICIAL Liverpool FC thread
« on: April 22, 2019, 06:24:07 AM »
I normally don't bother you soccer aficianados, but this is very funny...Jon Snow reacts to Liverpool winning the league...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMUKOU0ISkI

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