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Messages - APM

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1
GAA Discussion / Re: Would you be in favour of a second tier?
« on: September 19, 2018, 03:25:02 PM »
How does the second tier resolve the shite that is the Leinster Championship?

The second-tier will just do away with mismatches in the qualifiers which aren't televised.  It doesn't do away with the televised mismatches in Leinster. 

Solution.  No Second Tier - stop televising so many games in the Leinster Championship.  And I'm not really joking.

2
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 17, 2018, 11:12:09 AM »
Oh really? Why did you pick James McConnell?

Fair enough point - pick any preacher!

I'd let him join the youth team. 

If you are being genuine, then I would say fair play - I'm not so sure I'd feel the same, no more so than if the parish priest was coming into the club to say a rosary with the u14s before a championship final.  I go to mass weekly, so have no problem with religion per se. But I would have a major issue with it being foisted upon people who haven't asked for it. 

My major issue in all of this is that we assume that all gaelic footballers are catholic and that the only ones that would want to play are catholic.  Therefore, why wouldn't this be a problem.  That is a very dangerous assumption and that's what gets my goat about this. 

3
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 17, 2018, 10:37:36 AM »
What I'm describing is completely equivalent! EG brought the OO into it which was a false equivalence.  The scenario you describe above is also a false equivalent!

This is truly equivalent.  Both scenarios involve prayer associated with a particular religion or denomination before a game. 

Harte has given his players Rosary Beads and they have said the rosary together.  The team attends mass before games.  How is this any different to the scenario I have asked you to consider. 

Tell me what you would do? Tell me how that would make you feel about that club? Tell me how it would make you feel about the Irish League. 

4
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 17, 2018, 10:26:06 AM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.
Noticed an reference to this elsewhere, so took a quick look to see what the reaction was on this forum.

Frankly, I'm shocked - though not surprised - that this particular aspect of Cavanagh's book doesn't merit a thread of its own (or at least some comment from more than one or two individuals).

I mean, is no-one else astonished, even outraged, that a team manager could get away with imposing his personal religious leanings on an entire team, to the exclusion of those who may feel differently?

i read a lot of stuff about sledging and foul play etc, but there is at least some possible redress (referee) or comeback (retaliation) to those things, but what can someone on the Tyrone panel who doesn't agree say or do to this? Speak out and never play for the county again?

And all that's BEFORE you get to the context of sport and society in  NI.

Could you imagine the shitstorm if eg the Linfield manager required his players eg to take part in some sort of Orange Order parade, or British armed forces commemoration, or attend a Free Presbyterian service?

It would be roundly and publicly condemned, with the governing body clamping down immediately, and QUITE RIGHTLY too, imo. In fact, it's unthinkable. (And I say that as someone who pretty much despises Linfield, btw).

"GAA For All (Protestants need not apply)"

Those aren't accurate comparisons - I'd say an accurate comparison would be attending a church service, and the comparisons you've chosen are telling about you, but your general point is valid. (On a slight tangent though, weren't Irish league players forced to take part in a ceremony and have an anthem they don't recognise as theirs played as though it were recently??)

I don't see it as a big imposition at all, but nonetheless everyone should have their own free choice - I haven't seen any evidence yet that they didn't. If anyone went to MH and said, I'm not comfortable, do you really think they would have suffered repercussions re selection? I doubt it very much. It would seem noone involved had an issue (Unlike the Irish league example I mentioned earlier actually).

The majority of Irish catholics are brought up with the ritual of mass, when they have their own free choice they'll all attend weddings, funerals, mass at easter/christmas, for whatever reason. A mass before games in this context isn't a big deal. Irish catholicism isn't taken that seriously, its just a routine for many, and I think thats the context it needs to be taken in. its not forcing your religious views onto others, as it is being portrayed.

I think you missed the point there.
Most Irish catholics wouldn't have a major problem with it. But What about somebody who isn't catholic? It's a pretty big deal to anyone of any other religion (or no religion).  It could certainly be viewed as 'forcing' your catholic views onto non catholics.
Obviously, we don't know how much 'forcing' was done, but all managers want players to do things as a team. Therefore it's likely that everyone was strongly encouraged to go as a team!

I'm not missing the point. The players were all from a catholic background. The hypothetical situation you describe didn't occur. If it had, I'm sure it would have been dealt with in the proper manner. MH would of course have been aware of the situation and adjusted accordingly. He is there to build bonds and win matches, not convert people to catholicism.

At the end of the day, this was something willingly partaken in by a group of people comfortable with the environment they were in. What we now have is people outside that environment theorising about what took place, or could have took place, or how players probably weren't comfortable but weren't able to say anything....none of which I believe for a second.

And of course, it could be noted that if there was an issue the captain should surely be the person to bring that up with the management team at the time. Instead he sniped about it later, and hasn't chosen to point out that everyone seemed satisfied with the arrangement (if there'd been any murmurings you can bet he'd have written about them!)


You don't know that to be the case yet your saying others are theorising, surely you're just doing the same. I doubt very much that 30 odd twentysomethings in any Gaelic football squad are practicing Catholics and believe in God. Personally I'd be very annoyed in that was asked of me in a team setting and I think many younger players/fringe players etc. would feel they may not be able to raise their concerns. Harte is in a position of Tyrone GAA authority and a religious man himself, he shouldn't have mixed them together. It was totally out of order IMO.

There hasn't been the slightest murmurings of complaint from those who have ever partaken. Many of these have also left the panel now, so aren't restricted by the fear of MH that some posters would have you believe. So in the absence of a shred of evidence to the contrary, despite ample resources and time for such to be found, I think I'm entitled to form the opinion noone had an issue with it.

I agree completely that they are all very unlikey to be practicing catholics - the point the rest of the post made is that, when brought up as a catholic, you still partake in rituals when it suits - weddings, funerals, christmas, easter - without it costing you a thought. I think the same relevance should be placed on this ritual (i.e. not that much).

Good post which is very accurate.  Additionally, I doubt there are many top protestant forwards in Tyrone that we are missing out on.  I would be interested to see how many protestants are actually playing club football in Tyrone or any other of the counties in the North.

This attitude is a complete joke.  You need to wake up to yourself. 

Imagine the same conversation on the OWC forum.  "Sure what odds if Glentorinfield bring in Pastor James McConnell before the games for a prayer service.  There aren't too many Catholics playing in the Irish League and most of them play for Cliftonville anyway". This is what we call institutional sectarianism. 

What part of this don't you understand? It is not the players that you are currently missing out on in Tyrone - it is the long term perception of the GAA as an exclusively catholic organisation.  This applies as much to lapsed catholic families in Dublin, to protestants in the North, to Muslims in Ballyhaunis or to a catholics themselves that aren't comfortable with religion being brought into the changing room. 

It is also a concern that Mickey Harte's perception of the GAA is exclusively catholic, so much so, that he takes this approach.

Wise up.  Institutional sectarianism - good one.  The fact of the matter is that most GAA players are catholic.  Very few protestants play and I don't see that changing.  Do I have any issue with them playing?  Of course not, it would be great if it was more welcoming to protestants and became more inclusive.  However, in this case that you are getting your knickers in a twist over, a manager has taken his team to mass before games.  Harte knows the makeup of his squad, which I assume is all catholic, therefore he has done what he has done on this basis.  I doubt he would have arranged this if the squad had members of other faiths included.  I'm sure a lot of fellas didn't really want to go, moreso because they couldn't be bothered rather than the fact that they are extremely offended.  They had a choice still.  I am Catholic, but its been a long time since I was at mass, really because I have other things I would rather do.  If I was in the squad, I wouldn't have wanted to go but I probably would have went as it is no big deal and I've been hundreds of times before.  As Haranguerer said, you partake in rituals when the need arises - weddings, funerals, Christmas, Easter etc, without it costing you a thought.  I'm sure the players that attended went without much mulling over required, its only mass after all.   

I'd like you to address the scenario I mentioned above. 

Your 14 y/o son is a promising soccer player.  Top Irish League club want him to join their youth team.  You are up for it, but then you hear that Pastor James McConnell prays with the senior team before all their league and cup matches.  What do you do?


5
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 17, 2018, 09:11:19 AM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.
Noticed an reference to this elsewhere, so took a quick look to see what the reaction was on this forum.

Frankly, I'm shocked - though not surprised - that this particular aspect of Cavanagh's book doesn't merit a thread of its own (or at least some comment from more than one or two individuals).

I mean, is no-one else astonished, even outraged, that a team manager could get away with imposing his personal religious leanings on an entire team, to the exclusion of those who may feel differently?

i read a lot of stuff about sledging and foul play etc, but there is at least some possible redress (referee) or comeback (retaliation) to those things, but what can someone on the Tyrone panel who doesn't agree say or do to this? Speak out and never play for the county again?

And all that's BEFORE you get to the context of sport and society in  NI.

Could you imagine the shitstorm if eg the Linfield manager required his players eg to take part in some sort of Orange Order parade, or British armed forces commemoration, or attend a Free Presbyterian service?

It would be roundly and publicly condemned, with the governing body clamping down immediately, and QUITE RIGHTLY too, imo. In fact, it's unthinkable. (And I say that as someone who pretty much despises Linfield, btw).

"GAA For All (Protestants need not apply)"

Those aren't accurate comparisons - I'd say an accurate comparison would be attending a church service, and the comparisons you've chosen are telling about you, but your general point is valid. (On a slight tangent though, weren't Irish league players forced to take part in a ceremony and have an anthem they don't recognise as theirs played as though it were recently??)

I don't see it as a big imposition at all, but nonetheless everyone should have their own free choice - I haven't seen any evidence yet that they didn't. If anyone went to MH and said, I'm not comfortable, do you really think they would have suffered repercussions re selection? I doubt it very much. It would seem noone involved had an issue (Unlike the Irish league example I mentioned earlier actually).

The majority of Irish catholics are brought up with the ritual of mass, when they have their own free choice they'll all attend weddings, funerals, mass at easter/christmas, for whatever reason. A mass before games in this context isn't a big deal. Irish catholicism isn't taken that seriously, its just a routine for many, and I think thats the context it needs to be taken in. its not forcing your religious views onto others, as it is being portrayed.

I think you missed the point there.
Most Irish catholics wouldn't have a major problem with it. But What about somebody who isn't catholic? It's a pretty big deal to anyone of any other religion (or no religion).  It could certainly be viewed as 'forcing' your catholic views onto non catholics.
Obviously, we don't know how much 'forcing' was done, but all managers want players to do things as a team. Therefore it's likely that everyone was strongly encouraged to go as a team!

I'm not missing the point. The players were all from a catholic background. The hypothetical situation you describe didn't occur. If it had, I'm sure it would have been dealt with in the proper manner. MH would of course have been aware of the situation and adjusted accordingly. He is there to build bonds and win matches, not convert people to catholicism.

At the end of the day, this was something willingly partaken in by a group of people comfortable with the environment they were in. What we now have is people outside that environment theorising about what took place, or could have took place, or how players probably weren't comfortable but weren't able to say anything....none of which I believe for a second.

And of course, it could be noted that if there was an issue the captain should surely be the person to bring that up with the management team at the time. Instead he sniped about it later, and hasn't chosen to point out that everyone seemed satisfied with the arrangement (if there'd been any murmurings you can bet he'd have written about them!)


You don't know that to be the case yet your saying others are theorising, surely you're just doing the same. I doubt very much that 30 odd twentysomethings in any Gaelic football squad are practicing Catholics and believe in God. Personally I'd be very annoyed in that was asked of me in a team setting and I think many younger players/fringe players etc. would feel they may not be able to raise their concerns. Harte is in a position of Tyrone GAA authority and a religious man himself, he shouldn't have mixed them together. It was totally out of order IMO.

There hasn't been the slightest murmurings of complaint from those who have ever partaken. Many of these have also left the panel now, so aren't restricted by the fear of MH that some posters would have you believe. So in the absence of a shred of evidence to the contrary, despite ample resources and time for such to be found, I think I'm entitled to form the opinion noone had an issue with it.

I agree completely that they are all very unlikey to be practicing catholics - the point the rest of the post made is that, when brought up as a catholic, you still partake in rituals when it suits - weddings, funerals, christmas, easter - without it costing you a thought. I think the same relevance should be placed on this ritual (i.e. not that much).

Good post which is very accurate.  Additionally, I doubt there are many top protestant forwards in Tyrone that we are missing out on.  I would be interested to see how many protestants are actually playing club football in Tyrone or any other of the counties in the North.

This attitude is a complete joke.  You need to wake up to yourself. 

Imagine the same conversation on the OWC forum.  "Sure what odds if Glentorinfield bring in Pastor James McConnell before the games for a prayer service.  There aren't too many Catholics playing in the Irish League and most of them play for Cliftonville anyway". This is what we call institutional sectarianism. 

What part of this don't you understand? It is not the players that you are currently missing out on in Tyrone - it is the long term perception of the GAA as an exclusively catholic organisation.  This applies as much to lapsed catholic families in Dublin, to protestants in the North, to Muslims in Ballyhaunis or to a catholics themselves that aren't comfortable with religion being brought into the changing room. 

It is also a concern that Mickey Harte's perception of the GAA is exclusively catholic, so much so, that he takes this approach. 


6
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 14, 2018, 03:41:07 PM »
So they were required to go!!!


7
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 14, 2018, 03:34:34 PM »
This is rubbish.

Do you really think Mickey Harte, or indeed any top manager, has got to where they are without being aware of the personalities and their backgrounds in their panels? Do you think that Mickey Harte is making a concerted effort to get his panel to mass, and that he'd make the same effort to apparently convert a non-catholic? It is a pre-game ritual that works for the members of that panel. If the make-up of the panel was such that it wouldn't work, I've no doubt Mickey would identify that and alter it. His job, and one he is keenly aware of, is to win football matches.

Fact of the matter is, you all seem to be taking mass a lot more seriously than anyone I know who attends.

I also find it interesting that it is the mass the focus is on. If actually interested in the Tyrone panels inclusiveness, there are other more controversial examples - the only issue of course, is that Mickey Harte couldn't be made the target for those.

You need to open your mind! That's the same kind of argument that was used in institutionally sectarian organisations in Northern Ireland where people simply couldn't see why how there may be an issue with carrying on exclusively protestant or unionist practices. 

To your final point - what are they?

8
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 14, 2018, 03:20:16 PM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.
Noticed an reference to this elsewhere, so took a quick look to see what the reaction was on this forum.

Frankly, I'm shocked - though not surprised - that this particular aspect of Cavanagh's book doesn't merit a thread of its own (or at least some comment from more than one or two individuals).

I mean, is no-one else astonished, even outraged, that a team manager could get away with imposing his personal religious leanings on an entire team, to the exclusion of those who may feel differently?

i read a lot of stuff about sledging and foul play etc, but there is at least some possible redress (referee) or comeback (retaliation) to those things, but what can someone on the Tyrone panel who doesn't agree say or do to this? Speak out and never play for the county again?

And all that's BEFORE you get to the context of sport and society in  NI.

Could you imagine the shitstorm if eg the Linfield manager required his players eg to take part in some sort of Orange Order parade, or British armed forces commemoration, or attend a Free Presbyterian service?

It would be roundly and publicly condemned, with the governing body clamping down immediately, and QUITE RIGHTLY too, imo. In fact, it's unthinkable. (And I say that as someone who pretty much despises Linfield, btw).

"GAA For All (Protestants need not apply)"

I don't think your comparisons to OO are correct. But in general your point is. Harte should not be forcing his players to attend mass or say the Rosary or anything like that. But Harte is a bully and unfortunately a successful Bully which means his methods are beyond question from many in Tyrone. Do Tyrone have any protestants playing for them? Probably unlikely they will if this is what is going on. I think Ulster GAA or national GAA should put some sort of ban or at least a statement out saying this is not acceptable.

That was my thinking. If a promising Protestant player was called up for Tyrone, would he be put off by hearing about the rosary thing? I suspect he might be. And who would blame him?

That's it Benny - but its not just Tyrone that would be affected.  It is the whole of the GAA in Ulster that derives this image from Harte's actions. 

9
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 14, 2018, 03:08:18 PM »
I know EG is simply trying to attack the GAA, as is his way, but I agree that there should be no group forced religion brought into the squad set up. 20 years ago it may have been acceptable,  plenty of team masses when I was playing and never an eye lid batted. In fact they became part of the routine and as a player routine is everything so it was important to retain it. However, we could have opted out if we wanted to and lads did the odd time and the management didn’t make an issue.

BCB, I would agree that it was probably acceptable 20 years ago, and couldn't see how it could be tolerated today.  The mad thing is that I would be a weekly mass-goer, but if I was playing football for a "holy joe" manager and he made us go to mass before the games, I would really resent it.  But at a wider level, I think accepting this kind of behaviour leaves the GAA wide-open to allegations of being an institution that is only for catholics and when players for the "second best" team in Ireland are given rosary beads when they join the panel and are required to attend mass before games, it bloody difficult to argue with.

Have you any evidence at all that players were “required to attend mass before games” or that a holy joe manager “made them go to mass before the games”?

No! Forget about that - it's been done to death!

Talk to me about these reports from Cavanagh and others creating the perception of us being an institutionally and exclusively catholic organisation.  A cold house for other faiths. 

10
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 14, 2018, 02:43:02 PM »
I know EG is simply trying to attack the GAA, as is his way, but I agree that there should be no group forced religion brought into the squad set up. 20 years ago it may have been acceptable,  plenty of team masses when I was playing and never an eye lid batted. In fact they became part of the routine and as a player routine is everything so it was important to retain it. However, we could have opted out if we wanted to and lads did the odd time and the management didn’t make an issue.

BCB, I would agree that it was probably acceptable 20 years ago, and couldn't see how it could be tolerated today.  The mad thing is that I would be a weekly mass-goer, but if I was playing football for a "holy joe" manager and he made us go to mass before the games, I would really resent it.  But at a wider level, I think accepting this kind of behaviour leaves the GAA wide-open to allegations of being an institution that is only for catholics and when players for the "second best" team in Ireland are given rosary beads when they join the panel and are required to attend mass before games, it bloody difficult to argue with. 

11
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 14, 2018, 02:32:27 PM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.
Noticed an reference to this elsewhere, so took a quick look to see what the reaction was on this forum.

Frankly, I'm shocked - though not surprised - that this particular aspect of Cavanagh's book doesn't merit a thread of its own (or at least some comment from more than one or two individuals).

I mean, is no-one else astonished, even outraged, that a team manager could get away with imposing his personal religious leanings on an entire team, to the exclusion of those who may feel differently?

i read a lot of stuff about sledging and foul play etc, but there is at least some possible redress (referee) or comeback (retaliation) to those things, but what can someone on the Tyrone panel who doesn't agree say or do to this? Speak out and never play for the county again?

And all that's BEFORE you get to the context of sport and society in  NI.

Could you imagine the shitstorm if eg the Linfield manager required his players eg to take part in some sort of Orange Order parade, or British armed forces commemoration, or attend a Free Presbyterian service?

It would be roundly and publicly condemned, with the governing body clamping down immediately, and QUITE RIGHTLY too, imo. In fact, it's unthinkable. (And I say that as someone who pretty much despises Linfield, btw).

"GAA For All (Protestants need not apply)"

Those aren't accurate comparisons - I'd say an accurate comparison would be attending a church service, and the comparisons you've chosen are telling about you, but your general point is valid. (On a slight tangent though, weren't Irish league players forced to take part in a ceremony and have an anthem they don't recognise as theirs played as though it were recently??)

I don't see it as a big imposition at all, but nonetheless everyone should have their own free choice - I haven't seen any evidence yet that they didn't. If anyone went to MH and said, I'm not comfortable, do you really think they would have suffered repercussions re selection? I doubt it very much. It would seem noone involved had an issue (Unlike the Irish league example I mentioned earlier actually).

The majority of Irish catholics are brought up with the ritual of mass, when they have their own free choice they'll all attend weddings, funerals, mass at easter/christmas, for whatever reason. A mass before games in this context isn't a big deal. Irish catholicism isn't taken that seriously, its just a routine for many, and I think thats the context it needs to be taken in. its not forcing your religious views onto others, as it is being portrayed.

I think you missed the point there.
Most Irish catholics wouldn't have a major problem with it. But What about somebody who isn't catholic? It's a pretty big deal to anyone of any other religion (or no religion).  It could certainly be viewed as 'forcing' your catholic views onto non catholics.
Obviously, we don't know how much 'forcing' was done, but all managers want players to do things as a team. Therefore it's likely that everyone was strongly encouraged to go as a team!

I'm not missing the point. The players were all from a catholic background. The hypothetical situation you describe didn't occur. If it had, I'm sure it would have been dealt with in the proper manner. MH would of course have been aware of the situation and adjusted accordingly. He is there to build bonds and win matches, not convert people to catholicism.

At the end of the day, this was something willingly partaken in by a group of people comfortable with the environment they were in. What we now have is people outside that environment theorising about what took place, or could have took place, or how players probably weren't comfortable but weren't able to say anything....none of which I believe for a second.

And of course, it could be noted that if there was an issue the captain should surely be the person to bring that up with the management team at the time. Instead he sniped about it later, and hasn't chosen to point out that everyone seemed satisfied with the arrangement (if there'd been any murmurings you can bet he'd have written about them!)


You don't know that to be the case yet your saying others are theorising, surely you're just doing the same. I doubt very much that 30 odd twentysomethings in any Gaelic football squad are practicing Catholics and believe in God. Personally I'd be very annoyed in that was asked of me in a team setting and I think many younger players/fringe players etc. would feel they may not be able to raise their concerns. Harte is in a position of Tyrone GAA authority and a religious man himself, he shouldn't have mixed them together. It was totally out of order IMO.

There hasn't been the slightest murmurings of complaint from those who have ever partaken. Many of these have also left the panel now, so aren't restricted by the fear of MH that some posters would have you believe. So in the absence of a shred of evidence to the contrary, despite ample resources and time for such to be found, I think I'm entitled to form the opinion noone had an issue with it.

I agree completely that they are all very unlikey to be practicing catholics - the point the rest of the post made is that, when brought up as a catholic, you still partake in rituals when it suits - weddings, funerals, christmas, easter - without it costing you a thought. I think the same relevance should be placed on this ritual (i.e. not that much). 

I'm not worried about the fellas that went along with this and didn't complain - that's just good fortune.  I'm worried about the fact that this sends out a message, that the GAA is an exclusively catholic organisation, which it is most certainly not and nor do we want it to be perceived as such.  When we have a small cohort of protestant (and other faiths) playing for club and county, it is particularly important that we do not allow this kind of image to take hold.

Evil Genius is correct when he asks us to imagine our reaction if, for example, a soccer club in Dungannon held a prayer service before games led by an evangelical pastor.  I think most GAA peoples reaction to that would be "we wouldn't be welcome there".

To be honest, if people cannot see that, then I have serious doubts about how we can build a new Ireland without making the same mistakes that the unionist leaders made throughout the history of NI. 

I suspect that Mickey Harte is very strong in his religious beliefs and would be an exception in the world of GAA managers. I don't think we have a serious problem in the respect that there are few managers who would want to entertain, much less implement these types of practices.  But our reaction to it is very telling and I think we ought to open our minds to the fact that in the nine counties of Ulster, we will need to work hard at making the GAA appear to be welcome to all faiths and none. 

These practices and the acceptance / toleration of this both on this forum, in Tyrone and in the GAA in general, could be seen as a form of institutional bias which we should be working very hard to stamp out. 


12
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 10, 2018, 11:01:25 PM »
I was playing a game, up north don't you know. Fella on my team was doing nothing, innocent fella, never hurt a fly. In fact he looked after orphaned puppies in his spare time. Anyway in this game, he kicked a great score them up came this awful sc**bag b**tard ****. Pulled out a samurai sword and cut his head clean off.  Poor b**tard never played again and the perpetrator got off on an appeal. Disgusting.

Did the ref spell his name wrong? Was that how he got off?

That's only a black card!

13
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 10, 2018, 02:58:02 PM »
Quote

Thankfully there was no utter scumbags playing on seans team.



Quote
I look forward to Seans recollections on diving, sledging and other stuff Tyrone (amongst others) got up to during his time.



I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football.

Funny priorities here.

Five Points - you mightn't think it a priority and maybe I'm the only one, but I find Harte's bringing of religion into the changing room just as bad as bringing politics into it.  Very dangerous, backward road to be on.  It assumes everyone is a practicing catholic, and assumes everyone conforms.  People can be reared in the catholic community, but be very anti-church.  We do have small but rising numbers of protestants and other religions involved and need more. This is hugely inappropriate and must be tackled.  Can't understand that there isn't uproar over this.  GAA shouldn't be tolerating it in this day and age.  Before you say anything, I'm a practicing catholic myself, but find this totally wrong.

14
GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 10, 2018, 11:31:01 AM »
Regarding the player spitting and biting, despicable stuff. Remember playing a club game against a notorious shower of dirty ba#tards. Was moved in to full forward for the last ten minutes, walked towards the full back he some how managed to go inside my boxers and grab my ball sack, which he proceeded to hold for about 6 minutes.  Nothing I could do he literally had me by the balls. Early season had decided it was my last year playing, this incident ended my interest in playing. Fat headed red neck f×cktard.

Holy Shit! Don't think I've heard worse.  That's sexual assault - you should name and shame. 

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GAA Discussion / Re: Paul Kimmage interviews Sean Cavanagh
« on: September 10, 2018, 09:51:35 AM »
I know this was nothing new, but the stuff on Mass and the Rosary for me is something that the Tyrone CB should be looking very strongly at.  Totally inappropriate given the message it sends out to those with other faiths and none, that have an interest in playing Gaelic Football. 

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