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Messages - Il Bomber Destro

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1
General discussion / Re: Teachers get it handy!
« on: June 23, 2017, 07:33:33 PM »
Bomber, what facts do you deal in? You know nothing about being a teacher. That's the fact

The facts that teachers don't work for a quarter of the year. The fact that teachers are not unique in taking their work home. The fact that teachers enjoy a shorter working week than most.

2
General discussion / Re: Teachers get it handy!
« on: June 23, 2017, 07:17:43 PM »
Ha so says Bomber who was never a teacher!!

The legality of sending a child to school with a recording device, is breaking the law right there,

So only those who have 3/4 months annual leave in the year are entitled to comment on whether it is justified or not?

You'd soon find the real reason people take a career in teaching up if the annual leave entitlements were brought in line with other public sector workers.

Says the person who doesn't understand the idea of 'paid leave' or how teachers are paid.

Teachers are very well paid for their work. Their problem is that their place of employment only opens for 195 days per year.  So, their pay is limited.  They do not have the benefit of being able to work on the 42 days that others in full time employment can avail of.

They are only paid for working 195 days each year plus 28 days paid leave rather than the maximum 237 days ((53x5) - 28) that would be the norm for all other workers in full time employment who also receive 28 days paid leave. 

Up until the 1980s, teachers did not receive payment outside the school year.  Then a government decision was taken that payment should be spread over 12 months and not 10 months to ease and smooth the cash flow in the public sector purse.  This is now the norm for all public sector employees employed for less than 237 days.  So, at that time, teachers accepted a reduction in their monthly salaries because they were still paid for their work but payment was spread over the whole year.

Nowadays, under legislation for all employees, teachers get 28 days of holiday pay like all other public sector employees but this is subsumed into school closures. There was no increase in salary to take account of this change. Only 4 years ago, teachers received this right to the 28 days of paid holiday like every other worker.  A teacher ill for a period that does end before the summer break is entitled like every other worker to take all lost holidays before returning to work but if the period off is followed by the summer break then it is assumed that lost holidays are taken during the summer break.

However, teachers on temporary contracts, where they are paid the daily rate, remain without the right to holiday pay.  They are effectively on a form of zero hours contracts.  They earn the same as their permanent and temporary one year contracted colleagues over the year but are paid more per month, in any month without school closures, because they receive the daily rate = salary/195 rather than having it spread over the whole year.  They are only paid on the days they work and are unemployed outside the 195 days the school is open.

In short, teachers receive no more paid holidays than any other public sector employee, they are just very well paid on the 195 days they work and the statutory 28 days of paid holiday enjoyed by all.

Semantics.

They get paid throughout the year and are off work for 3/4 months of it.

Overpaid and underworked. There's never a shortage of teachers because people get into teaching for the holidays, take the holiday package away and bring it in line with other public sector areas and the amount of people pursuing teaching as a career would drop dramatically.

It then might stop teachers complaining about a lack of hours.

I think you meant underpaid and overworked. If you know nothing about a topic bomber you really shouldn't comment on it. As for people go into teaching for the holidays, wrong again. I never met a teacher who did that. In fact, I know quite a few, including myself, who got out of teaching despite the holidays

No I didn't. I've worked and lived with teachers so I do have my own insights to what they do. You said you never knew a teacher got it in for the holidays. Brilliant, so there should be no objection if teachers were put to working during the school breaks with community based projects.

Teachers live in a bubble. They are overpaid and underworked.

Are you a teacher or married to one?

So you have no first hand experience of teaching do you? Why would they do community based projects? Although I know quite a few who do that kind of work during holidays, running summer camps etc, but why would they? Would you put a doctor onto community based projects during thir time off? A binman? A solicitor? So why a teacher
I will say it again, with first hand experience, unlike you. Teachers are overworked and underpaid

Why would they do community based projects? Because for one quarter of the working year they do nothing. Teachers are like unionists in that they feel a sense of entitlement to perks that others don't have and never will

It's quite simple really. If the very generous holidays that teachers get are not a reason or incentive for people pursuing that career then it shouldn't be a problem scrapping that entitlement and bringing it in line with other, already generous, public sector employment.

Teachers are very defensive about their  3 months holidays. They feel a sense of entitlement to them. Why do they feel they deserve them in contrast with other workers?

you do not have a clue what you are talking about and quite clearly now nothing about the working lives of teachers. Cheerio

I would counter that teachers would not know anything about a working life. They have more in common with benefits recipients than the working man.

youd be wrong

Yes they do.

They don't work June*, July, August, half of December, Easter and Halloween.

As I said teachers are very much like unionists.

Like I said before, youre full of it

You're full of bluster. I deal in facts.

3
I'm only dealing in facts here and I'm free of bias. If people are intolerant of facts then that's not my problem.
Maybe Roscommon fans need to realise it is not the 1950s and park up their Ford Anglias.
Dealing in facts and what is your problem is you are delicate soul because some Rossie on here upset you about your precious Tyrone. Time for you to move on and away from this topic as lets be honest you probably know more about 1950s Ford Anglias than the ins or outs of Roscommon football.

I'm anything but delicate. I'm a pragmatist and deal in substance over style, this is nothing personal, it just happens that Roscommon get an awful lot of hot air wrote about them and a lot of that is from themselves. The sensitive souls are actually from guys like yourself who don't want valid criticism put in front of them.

What do you think I have said about Roscommon that is untrue or unfair? Be specific as well.I won't be giving empathetic cuddles because you lads got carried away with yourselves, I'll say it as it is and that would seem to be your problem - hyper sensitivity.

4
GAA Discussion / Re: Down v Monaghan - Saturday 24th June at 7pm
« on: June 23, 2017, 03:52:32 PM »
Where did Christopher McGuinness and Hanratty disappear to?

5
Jesus Bomber you wouldn't think Tyrone have only one more Sam than Ros.

I'm not a dinosaur. Unless you're a pensioner then you wouldn't remember Roscommon winning an AI.
Most Rossies  would be able to  remember back to when Tyrone was looking for an arse for its trousers

https://youtu.be/cxeAr3n2Ous

Would they?

Was that back when they bought their Ford Anglias?

6
That's an independent view, free of bias.
;D



you still didn't name any of the U21 players who didn't come through to senior because they are 'crocked'

I never mentioned anything about u21 teams.

All above players mentioned by me in previous post have done more at senior level than any Tyrone player of the same age. You fail to mention Diarmuid Murtagh or Enda Smith both of same age who could walk onto any team in the country.

Ah yes, here we go.

A prime example of the sort of misguided hype of Roscommon. None of those players have done anything of note at senior level.

Hampsey just picked up a MOTM award against Donegal last Sunday. Mark Bradley destroyed Paul Murphy in an All Ireland semi in 2015. McGeary and Rory Brennan also contributed to last year's Ulster Final win over Donegal with Brennan putting the shackles on Ryan McHugh.

I would say that's a lot more than any Roscommon player has done in senior Championship.

You know the name of Tyrone players good lad, now stick with what you know and less of what you don't.

I'm only dealing in facts here and I'm free of bias. If people are intolerant of facts then that's not my problem.

Maybe Roscommon fans need to realise it is not the 1950s and park up their Ford Anglias.

7
General discussion / Re: Teachers get it handy!
« on: June 23, 2017, 11:17:38 AM »
Ha so says Bomber who was never a teacher!!

The legality of sending a child to school with a recording device, is breaking the law right there,

So only those who have 3/4 months annual leave in the year are entitled to comment on whether it is justified or not?

You'd soon find the real reason people take a career in teaching up if the annual leave entitlements were brought in line with other public sector workers.

Says the person who doesn't understand the idea of 'paid leave' or how teachers are paid.

Teachers are very well paid for their work. Their problem is that their place of employment only opens for 195 days per year.  So, their pay is limited.  They do not have the benefit of being able to work on the 42 days that others in full time employment can avail of.

They are only paid for working 195 days each year plus 28 days paid leave rather than the maximum 237 days ((53x5) - 28) that would be the norm for all other workers in full time employment who also receive 28 days paid leave. 

Up until the 1980s, teachers did not receive payment outside the school year.  Then a government decision was taken that payment should be spread over 12 months and not 10 months to ease and smooth the cash flow in the public sector purse.  This is now the norm for all public sector employees employed for less than 237 days.  So, at that time, teachers accepted a reduction in their monthly salaries because they were still paid for their work but payment was spread over the whole year.

Nowadays, under legislation for all employees, teachers get 28 days of holiday pay like all other public sector employees but this is subsumed into school closures. There was no increase in salary to take account of this change. Only 4 years ago, teachers received this right to the 28 days of paid holiday like every other worker.  A teacher ill for a period that does end before the summer break is entitled like every other worker to take all lost holidays before returning to work but if the period off is followed by the summer break then it is assumed that lost holidays are taken during the summer break.

However, teachers on temporary contracts, where they are paid the daily rate, remain without the right to holiday pay.  They are effectively on a form of zero hours contracts.  They earn the same as their permanent and temporary one year contracted colleagues over the year but are paid more per month, in any month without school closures, because they receive the daily rate = salary/195 rather than having it spread over the whole year.  They are only paid on the days they work and are unemployed outside the 195 days the school is open.

In short, teachers receive no more paid holidays than any other public sector employee, they are just very well paid on the 195 days they work and the statutory 28 days of paid holiday enjoyed by all.

Semantics.

They get paid throughout the year and are off work for 3/4 months of it.

Overpaid and underworked. There's never a shortage of teachers because people get into teaching for the holidays, take the holiday package away and bring it in line with other public sector areas and the amount of people pursuing teaching as a career would drop dramatically.

It then might stop teachers complaining about a lack of hours.

I think you meant underpaid and overworked. If you know nothing about a topic bomber you really shouldn't comment on it. As for people go into teaching for the holidays, wrong again. I never met a teacher who did that. In fact, I know quite a few, including myself, who got out of teaching despite the holidays

No I didn't. I've worked and lived with teachers so I do have my own insights to what they do. You said you never knew a teacher got it in for the holidays. Brilliant, so there should be no objection if teachers were put to working during the school breaks with community based projects.

Teachers live in a bubble. They are overpaid and underworked.

Are you a teacher or married to one?

So you have no first hand experience of teaching do you? Why would they do community based projects? Although I know quite a few who do that kind of work during holidays, running summer camps etc, but why would they? Would you put a doctor onto community based projects during thir time off? A binman? A solicitor? So why a teacher
I will say it again, with first hand experience, unlike you. Teachers are overworked and underpaid

Why would they do community based projects? Because for one quarter of the working year they do nothing. Teachers are like unionists in that they feel a sense of entitlement to perks that others don't have and never will

It's quite simple really. If the very generous holidays that teachers get are not a reason or incentive for people pursuing that career then it shouldn't be a problem scrapping that entitlement and bringing it in line with other, already generous, public sector employment.

Teachers are very defensive about their  3 months holidays. They feel a sense of entitlement to them. Why do they feel they deserve them in contrast with other workers?

you do not have a clue what you are talking about and quite clearly now nothing about the working lives of teachers. Cheerio

I would counter that teachers would not know anything about a working life. They have more in common with benefits recipients than the working man.

youd be wrong

Yes they do.

They don't work June*, July, August, half of December, Easter and Halloween.

As I said teachers are very much like unionists.

8
Jesus Bomber you wouldn't think Tyrone have only one more Sam than Ros.

I'm not a dinosaur. Unless you're a pensioner then you wouldn't remember Roscommon winning an AI.

9
you still didn't name any of the U21 players who didn't come through to senior because they are 'crocked'

I never mentioned anything about u21 teams.

All above players mentioned by me in previous post have done more at senior level than any Tyrone player of the same age. You fail to mention Diarmuid Murtagh or Enda Smith both of same age who could walk onto any team in the country.

Ah yes, here we go.

A prime example of the sort of misguided hype of Roscommon. None of those players have done anything of note at senior level.

Hampsey just picked up a MOTM award against Donegal last Sunday. Mark Bradley destroyed Paul Murphy in an All Ireland semi in 2015. McGeary and Rory Brennan also contributed to last year's Ulster Final win over Donegal with Brennan putting the shackles on Ryan McHugh.

I would say that's a lot more than any Roscommon player has done in senior Championship.

10
you still didn't name any of the U21 players who didn't come through to senior because they are 'crocked'

I never mentioned anything about u21 teams.

11
General discussion / Re: Teachers get it handy!
« on: June 23, 2017, 08:15:53 AM »
Ha so says Bomber who was never a teacher!!

The legality of sending a child to school with a recording device, is breaking the law right there,

So only those who have 3/4 months annual leave in the year are entitled to comment on whether it is justified or not?

You'd soon find the real reason people take a career in teaching up if the annual leave entitlements were brought in line with other public sector workers.

Says the person who doesn't understand the idea of 'paid leave' or how teachers are paid.

Teachers are very well paid for their work. Their problem is that their place of employment only opens for 195 days per year.  So, their pay is limited.  They do not have the benefit of being able to work on the 42 days that others in full time employment can avail of.

They are only paid for working 195 days each year plus 28 days paid leave rather than the maximum 237 days ((53x5) - 28) that would be the norm for all other workers in full time employment who also receive 28 days paid leave. 

Up until the 1980s, teachers did not receive payment outside the school year.  Then a government decision was taken that payment should be spread over 12 months and not 10 months to ease and smooth the cash flow in the public sector purse.  This is now the norm for all public sector employees employed for less than 237 days.  So, at that time, teachers accepted a reduction in their monthly salaries because they were still paid for their work but payment was spread over the whole year.

Nowadays, under legislation for all employees, teachers get 28 days of holiday pay like all other public sector employees but this is subsumed into school closures. There was no increase in salary to take account of this change. Only 4 years ago, teachers received this right to the 28 days of paid holiday like every other worker.  A teacher ill for a period that does end before the summer break is entitled like every other worker to take all lost holidays before returning to work but if the period off is followed by the summer break then it is assumed that lost holidays are taken during the summer break.

However, teachers on temporary contracts, where they are paid the daily rate, remain without the right to holiday pay.  They are effectively on a form of zero hours contracts.  They earn the same as their permanent and temporary one year contracted colleagues over the year but are paid more per month, in any month without school closures, because they receive the daily rate = salary/195 rather than having it spread over the whole year.  They are only paid on the days they work and are unemployed outside the 195 days the school is open.

In short, teachers receive no more paid holidays than any other public sector employee, they are just very well paid on the 195 days they work and the statutory 28 days of paid holiday enjoyed by all.

Semantics.

They get paid throughout the year and are off work for 3/4 months of it.

Overpaid and underworked. There's never a shortage of teachers because people get into teaching for the holidays, take the holiday package away and bring it in line with other public sector areas and the amount of people pursuing teaching as a career would drop dramatically.

It then might stop teachers complaining about a lack of hours.

I think you meant underpaid and overworked. If you know nothing about a topic bomber you really shouldn't comment on it. As for people go into teaching for the holidays, wrong again. I never met a teacher who did that. In fact, I know quite a few, including myself, who got out of teaching despite the holidays

No I didn't. I've worked and lived with teachers so I do have my own insights to what they do. You said you never knew a teacher got it in for the holidays. Brilliant, so there should be no objection if teachers were put to working during the school breaks with community based projects.

Teachers live in a bubble. They are overpaid and underworked.

Are you a teacher or married to one?

So you have no first hand experience of teaching do you? Why would they do community based projects? Although I know quite a few who do that kind of work during holidays, running summer camps etc, but why would they? Would you put a doctor onto community based projects during thir time off? A binman? A solicitor? So why a teacher
I will say it again, with first hand experience, unlike you. Teachers are overworked and underpaid

Why would they do community based projects? Because for one quarter of the working year they do nothing. Teachers are like unionists in that they feel a sense of entitlement to perks that others don't have and never will

It's quite simple really. If the very generous holidays that teachers get are not a reason or incentive for people pursuing that career then it shouldn't be a problem scrapping that entitlement and bringing it in line with other, already generous, public sector employment.

Teachers are very defensive about their  3 months holidays. They feel a sense of entitlement to them. Why do they feel they deserve them in contrast with other workers?

you do not have a clue what you are talking about and quite clearly now nothing about the working lives of teachers. Cheerio

I would counter that teachers would not know anything about a working life. They have more in common with benefits recipients than the working man.
I worked in sales reping and other stuff before teaching.
yeah, it was a longer day in thos ejobs, but the teaching takes a lot of preparation is quite tiring and can be quite stressful with certain pupils and silly parents

and its the kids who need the break as well
they are wrecked at the moment with the heat

Many jobs take a lot of prep outside working hours, meetings (boards, management, clients), presentations etc. Taking work home with you is nothing unique to teachers.

12
General discussion / Re: Teachers get it handy!
« on: June 23, 2017, 06:51:41 AM »
Bomber your obviously a WOM, my wife is a teacher and plenty of her friends are and she works 8-5 and then comes home and can be marking 2-3 hours per night (which they don't get paid for) and also marks at the weekends. I'm thankful that I'm in a job thats 9-5 and I dont worry about it in the evening or the weekend.

The fully deserve in holidays they get, if you think its such an easy job then maybe get into it yourself.

She works 8-5?

Does she now? She clocks into school and starts working bang on 8am and finishes at 5pm leaving the school? How many hours off has she in between? 8am-5pm with lunch breaks inclusive is a standard 40 hour working week for a lot of people, the problem with teachers is that if they do anything above the bare minimum they think they are martyrs. Teachers live in a bubble, they are institutionalised to think they have to work hard, in contrast with others they have it easy street. They never experience work outside of teaching so forgive me if I laugh when others accuse critics of teachers perks of not being able to comment on it when teachers have no practical experience of the vice versa.

It all boils down to the 3/4 months holidays teachers get every year and the sense of entitlement attached to it. What makes teachers entitled to this over any other and let us for once knock this on the head that this is not the main reason people pursue teaching as a career. If it wasn't such a big deal then why isn't it taken away and have teachers brought in line with all other public sector workers.

Teachers do not fully deserve the holidays they get. Plenty of people work hard, they do extra hours they get nothing for at work, many, many people in the private sector will do lots of extra hours in work they don't get paid for. Many see it as part of the parcel of work, teachers have a sense of entitlement to 3/4 months holidays which is not in existence in any other line of work.

As I said, let us see how many people fancy teaching as a profession without the 3/4 months holidays.

13
General discussion / Re: Teachers get it handy!
« on: June 23, 2017, 06:36:27 AM »
Ha so says Bomber who was never a teacher!!

The legality of sending a child to school with a recording device, is breaking the law right there,

So only those who have 3/4 months annual leave in the year are entitled to comment on whether it is justified or not?

You'd soon find the real reason people take a career in teaching up if the annual leave entitlements were brought in line with other public sector workers.

Says the person who doesn't understand the idea of 'paid leave' or how teachers are paid.

Teachers are very well paid for their work. Their problem is that their place of employment only opens for 195 days per year.  So, their pay is limited.  They do not have the benefit of being able to work on the 42 days that others in full time employment can avail of.

They are only paid for working 195 days each year plus 28 days paid leave rather than the maximum 237 days ((53x5) - 28) that would be the norm for all other workers in full time employment who also receive 28 days paid leave. 

Up until the 1980s, teachers did not receive payment outside the school year.  Then a government decision was taken that payment should be spread over 12 months and not 10 months to ease and smooth the cash flow in the public sector purse.  This is now the norm for all public sector employees employed for less than 237 days.  So, at that time, teachers accepted a reduction in their monthly salaries because they were still paid for their work but payment was spread over the whole year.

Nowadays, under legislation for all employees, teachers get 28 days of holiday pay like all other public sector employees but this is subsumed into school closures. There was no increase in salary to take account of this change. Only 4 years ago, teachers received this right to the 28 days of paid holiday like every other worker.  A teacher ill for a period that does end before the summer break is entitled like every other worker to take all lost holidays before returning to work but if the period off is followed by the summer break then it is assumed that lost holidays are taken during the summer break.

However, teachers on temporary contracts, where they are paid the daily rate, remain without the right to holiday pay.  They are effectively on a form of zero hours contracts.  They earn the same as their permanent and temporary one year contracted colleagues over the year but are paid more per month, in any month without school closures, because they receive the daily rate = salary/195 rather than having it spread over the whole year.  They are only paid on the days they work and are unemployed outside the 195 days the school is open.

In short, teachers receive no more paid holidays than any other public sector employee, they are just very well paid on the 195 days they work and the statutory 28 days of paid holiday enjoyed by all.

Semantics.

They get paid throughout the year and are off work for 3/4 months of it.

Overpaid and underworked. There's never a shortage of teachers because people get into teaching for the holidays, take the holiday package away and bring it in line with other public sector areas and the amount of people pursuing teaching as a career would drop dramatically.

It then might stop teachers complaining about a lack of hours.

I think you meant underpaid and overworked. If you know nothing about a topic bomber you really shouldn't comment on it. As for people go into teaching for the holidays, wrong again. I never met a teacher who did that. In fact, I know quite a few, including myself, who got out of teaching despite the holidays

No I didn't. I've worked and lived with teachers so I do have my own insights to what they do. You said you never knew a teacher got it in for the holidays. Brilliant, so there should be no objection if teachers were put to working during the school breaks with community based projects.

Teachers live in a bubble. They are overpaid and underworked.

Are you a teacher or married to one?

So you have no first hand experience of teaching do you? Why would they do community based projects? Although I know quite a few who do that kind of work during holidays, running summer camps etc, but why would they? Would you put a doctor onto community based projects during thir time off? A binman? A solicitor? So why a teacher
I will say it again, with first hand experience, unlike you. Teachers are overworked and underpaid

Why would they do community based projects? Because for one quarter of the working year they do nothing. Teachers are like unionists in that they feel a sense of entitlement to perks that others don't have and never will

It's quite simple really. If the very generous holidays that teachers get are not a reason or incentive for people pursuing that career then it shouldn't be a problem scrapping that entitlement and bringing it in line with other, already generous, public sector employment.

Teachers are very defensive about their  3 months holidays. They feel a sense of entitlement to them. Why do they feel they deserve them in contrast with other workers?

you do not have a clue what you are talking about and quite clearly now nothing about the working lives of teachers. Cheerio

I would counter that teachers would not know anything about a working life. They have more in common with benefits recipients than the working man.

14
You'd have to expect a severe backlash from the Rossies, last years replay was their biggest embarrassment since the Gay Referendum.

On a different note, complete joke that the provincial losers get to join the qualifiers at R4. They should join at R3 and have the R3 winners facing off in R4

System is stacked enough as it is against provincial final losers. That would be a mental change tbh.

It's a total disgrace that Roscommon could beat Leitrim and get beat by Galway and still are one match away from a QF. Monaghan have to beat Fermanagh, Cavan, Down, lose against Tyrone then win a R4 game to reach the same spot. The Rossies have 'er handy.

Ulster is shite lad. Ye beat the Donegal U21 team and suddenly eejits think ye'll not only give Dublin a game but beat them.

I believe Roscommon have been tossed out by Ulster sides in 4 of the past 5 Championships.


True. But in the last 4 or 5 years, outside province, Roscommon have only been able to knock out Ulster sides - Cavan a few times, and Armagh.

Quote

I believe it's also 16 or 17 years since Roscommon beat either Mayo or Galway in Championship football.

Beat both in 2001, previous to that in 90 and 91. High time we altered that. I believe the current group of players, right now a very young team,  have enough talent to change that.

What is interesting about the batch of Roscommon underage teams that had moderate to decent success over the past 7/8 years is how many of them have turned out to be crocks?

Were they just thrown into senior too early and flogged? They've been hyped up quite a bit over the last few years and I think there has been a very soft core in them, I think they believe a lot of the hype and when things tend to go bad for them, they fold rather than dig in and turn it around. The Clare game being a prime example.
give us a few examples?

its the third level colleges who seem to be doing all the flogging. And not a word about it in the GAA when burnout is mentioned

Wasting your time with that individual. Without the aid of google he would struggle to name 2 or 3 Roscommon players that has come through U-21 level recently and has gone on hold down a senior spot on the team. You are correct about third level colleges BTW especially the finals weekends when young players are forced to play twice in two days even Jim Gavin spoke out about it this year.

http://www.the42.ie/gavin-mcaffrey-sigerson-dublin-3271418-Mar2017/
Sorry to hear that Oliver.
I suppose retiree might be more accurate but he's still absent anyway.
Of course there's Harney, Cathal Compton, Corcoran and Cafferkey too.

Doubt any of them will be back for Final if we do get over Leitrim

Corcoran is in the US. He left panel after breaking his collar bone which would have ruled him out of any county action for the year anyway.
Compton

Harney fracture on his back does not seem to be healing with current rehab and is due for another scan soon. He might not kick a ball for the rest of the year but hopefully the scan will shed more light.

Compton needs a break from football although he technically could be fit if we reach final he has had a number of hamstring tares in last few months and really need to mind himself for the future hes only 21/22

The above is a post from one of your own outlining some of your crocks.

You Roscommon guys are even worse than Mayo fans when it comes to myopic pining about any sort of criticism or blowback on their players.

Their championship record in recent years is pitiful, that's a fact.

They have been hyped up in recent years to make a breakthrough, they have done nothing of the sort. They have had decent underage performances in the past 10 years but none of that group have done anything at senior level.

In past three seasons they have been handed golden paths to an All Ireland qf.

In 2015, all they had to do was beat Sligo and win one more game for a last 8 slot - they lost to Sligo and then got tossed out by Fermanagh.

In 2016, it was New York, Sligo and Clare in their way, they scraped past New York, got trounced by Galway in the Connacht final and downed their tools in an exit against 14 man Clare.

This year, it is Leitrim and win one more game.

What's the reason for this?

The players just aren't that good?
The players believe their hype too much and mentally are a soft touch?
Or they've been decimated by injuries after flogging these young lads?

Very similar to the Mayo fans on here, Roscommon fans seem to lack introspection. My own view would be that as long as their players are protected species, treated as demigods and immune from any sort of blowback when they underachieve or underperform then they won't be doing anything at Championship level.

With the money being pumped into Roscommon football and the hype surrounding I feel the fans should be asking some serious questions about their players but I don't see it.

That's an independent view, free of bias.

15
General discussion / Re: Teachers get it handy!
« on: June 22, 2017, 01:15:34 PM »
Ha so says Bomber who was never a teacher!!

The legality of sending a child to school with a recording device, is breaking the law right there,

So only those who have 3/4 months annual leave in the year are entitled to comment on whether it is justified or not?

You'd soon find the real reason people take a career in teaching up if the annual leave entitlements were brought in line with other public sector workers.

Says the person who doesn't understand the idea of 'paid leave' or how teachers are paid.

Teachers are very well paid for their work. Their problem is that their place of employment only opens for 195 days per year.  So, their pay is limited.  They do not have the benefit of being able to work on the 42 days that others in full time employment can avail of.

They are only paid for working 195 days each year plus 28 days paid leave rather than the maximum 237 days ((53x5) - 28) that would be the norm for all other workers in full time employment who also receive 28 days paid leave. 

Up until the 1980s, teachers did not receive payment outside the school year.  Then a government decision was taken that payment should be spread over 12 months and not 10 months to ease and smooth the cash flow in the public sector purse.  This is now the norm for all public sector employees employed for less than 237 days.  So, at that time, teachers accepted a reduction in their monthly salaries because they were still paid for their work but payment was spread over the whole year.

Nowadays, under legislation for all employees, teachers get 28 days of holiday pay like all other public sector employees but this is subsumed into school closures. There was no increase in salary to take account of this change. Only 4 years ago, teachers received this right to the 28 days of paid holiday like every other worker.  A teacher ill for a period that does end before the summer break is entitled like every other worker to take all lost holidays before returning to work but if the period off is followed by the summer break then it is assumed that lost holidays are taken during the summer break.

However, teachers on temporary contracts, where they are paid the daily rate, remain without the right to holiday pay.  They are effectively on a form of zero hours contracts.  They earn the same as their permanent and temporary one year contracted colleagues over the year but are paid more per month, in any month without school closures, because they receive the daily rate = salary/195 rather than having it spread over the whole year.  They are only paid on the days they work and are unemployed outside the 195 days the school is open.

In short, teachers receive no more paid holidays than any other public sector employee, they are just very well paid on the 195 days they work and the statutory 28 days of paid holiday enjoyed by all.

Semantics.

They get paid throughout the year and are off work for 3/4 months of it.

Overpaid and underworked. There's never a shortage of teachers because people get into teaching for the holidays, take the holiday package away and bring it in line with other public sector areas and the amount of people pursuing teaching as a career would drop dramatically.

It then might stop teachers complaining about a lack of hours.

I think you meant underpaid and overworked. If you know nothing about a topic bomber you really shouldn't comment on it. As for people go into teaching for the holidays, wrong again. I never met a teacher who did that. In fact, I know quite a few, including myself, who got out of teaching despite the holidays

No I didn't. I've worked and lived with teachers so I do have my own insights to what they do. You said you never knew a teacher got it in for the holidays. Brilliant, so there should be no objection if teachers were put to working during the school breaks with community based projects.

Teachers live in a bubble. They are overpaid and underworked.

Are you a teacher or married to one?

So you have no first hand experience of teaching do you? Why would they do community based projects? Although I know quite a few who do that kind of work during holidays, running summer camps etc, but why would they? Would you put a doctor onto community based projects during thir time off? A binman? A solicitor? So why a teacher
I will say it again, with first hand experience, unlike you. Teachers are overworked and underpaid

Why would they do community based projects? Because for one quarter of the working year they do nothing. Teachers are like unionists in that they feel a sense of entitlement to perks that others don't have and never will

It's quite simple really. If the very generous holidays that teachers get are not a reason or incentive for people pursuing that career then it shouldn't be a problem scrapping that entitlement and bringing it in line with other, already generous, public sector employment.

Teachers are very defensive about their  3 months holidays. They feel a sense of entitlement to them. Why do they feel they deserve them in contrast with other workers?

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