Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - AQMP

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 187
1
There's another very important aspect to be considered - SF need to keep their grassroots onside. It isn't in anyone's interest for grumblings to start about them abandoning the struggle, and the potential for havoc that perceived vacuum would have.

Err, you’re talking about the party that isn’t even bothering it’s hole negotiating an agreement to resume power-sharing and brought it down in the first place? SF are chaos.
Really?  Negotiate what exactly?  The vast majority of nationalist do not want Sinn Fein to resume power sharing as it was before.  Those same nationalists ie their voters,wanted them to bring it down.

This is more or less it.  Power sharing is over.  It doesn't work. The GFA is a busted flush.  Adams got one thing right.  It's the equality agenda Unionists can't handle, though he used a different turn of phrase!

Ha! You're sounding like the one-man-show called Jim Allister.

A busted clock is right twice a day...

2
General discussion / Re: Dublin rip offs and how to avoid
« on: Today at 03:42:58 PM »
I attended the Bord Gais Energy Theatre last night, where the evening car park rate,normally concessionary,from 6pm to midnight,was a whopping €13.You would pay £4 max in Belfast.

Unfortunately the Bord Gais Energy Theatre isn't in Belfast.

3
Any Sinners even suggesting power-sharing is done when the DUP have May over a barrel in Westminster and benefit greatly from direct rule are akin to turkeys voting for Christmas.

The north is a bizarro world where common sense has always been in short supply on both sides.

The Tories will eventually tire of the unionists and shaft them.  They always do.


4
GAA Discussion / Re: Rule changes to improve football
« on: Today at 01:40:48 PM »
Gridiron football is always chopping and changing its rules almost on an annual basis.

The egg chasers here are always tinkering with the rules.

5
There's another very important aspect to be considered - SF need to keep their grassroots onside. It isn't in anyone's interest for grumblings to start about them abandoning the struggle, and the potential for havoc that perceived vacuum would have.

Err, you’re talking about the party that isn’t even bothering it’s hole negotiating an agreement to resume power-sharing and brought it down in the first place? SF are chaos.
Really?  Negotiate what exactly?  The vast majority of nationalist do not want Sinn Fein to resume power sharing as it was before.  Those same nationalists ie their voters,wanted them to bring it down.

This is more or less it.  Power sharing is over.  It doesn't work. The GFA is a busted flush.  Adams got one thing right.  It's the equality agenda Unionists can't handle, though he used a different turn of phrase!

6
General discussion / Re: Death Notices
« on: November 22, 2017, 09:07:43 AM »
Ok I'll work on my comedy act.

Seriously double standards here.

Stop making everything about you. You made a crass "joke" about a 49 year old woman dying of breast cancer and you got called out for acting like an arsehole.

Would you post something like that on your Facebook - would you f**k.

Wind yer neck in.

Surely the joke wasn't about her dying of cancer?  It alluded to the fact that she used to be a tennis player?

7
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: November 21, 2017, 11:21:09 AM »
Reports this morning that the Brits have agreed to pay the EU €40 million as part of the divorce deal.  I wonder will the DUP vote in favour of that??

8
General discussion / Re: Death Notices
« on: November 21, 2017, 11:16:42 AM »
It really does beg the question ..... "What makes intelligent people do this?"  ::)

Indeed.

9
General discussion / Re: Death Notices
« on: November 21, 2017, 10:52:48 AM »
There is a semblance of a point to Tony’s argument here.. His jokes are shite almost all the time pathetic even but were they said about different people or even by someone other than Tony they’d pass by almost unnoticed.

There a fair bit of playing the man not the ball going on..

I agree.  There's a fair bit of "neck winding in" required here too.  Let's face it, the comment may have failed the first rule of comedy i.e. it wasn't funny, but there's a queue forming here to see who can be the first to be offended and who can be most offended.
You have to be guarded about these things sure but personally speaking I wasn't offended by it at all... more so just rolling the eyes at this person who's meant to be nearer thy god to thee but continually comes out with this sick humor for an internet lol. Says something about him that this is one of his things rather than just some one off. No harm in calling that out I don't think

Fair enough skull, good point.

10
General discussion / Re: Brexit.
« on: November 21, 2017, 09:59:17 AM »
Usual dung from Arlene or is she getting a bit concerned?

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/20/hmrc-bosses-have-few-plans-for-managing-northern-irish-border-after-brexit

The Democratic Unionist party has launched a scathing attack on Brussels and Dublin politicians accusing them of trying to use Northern Ireland to “blackmail” Brexit negotiators in London.

Arlene Foster, the party’s leader, issued a strongly worded statement on Monday night, three days after Ireland’s taoiseach warned that the country would block progress in Brexit talks unless the UK came up with proposals to avoid a hard border with Northern Ireland.

But Foster hit back, saying Brussels and Dublin were “wrecklessly (sic) trying to use Northern Ireland for their own objectives”.

She acknowledged that external parties had a role in bringing peace to the region, where life was blighted by bloodshed during the 30 years of the Troubles, but said it was “downright careless” to suggest Brexit would bring a return to violence.

“The people of Northern Ireland delivered peace and stability,” Foster said. “Yes, they were supported beyond these shores, but to suggest that exiting the EU will bring violence onto our streets is downright careless.

“Those in Dublin and Brussels, wrecklessly (sic) trying to use Northern Ireland for their own objectives, should cease. The prime minister should warn Brussels that Northern Ireland must not be used as blackmail.”

She and her deputy Nigel Dodds will meet Theresa May on Tuesday to talk about Brexit and the restoration of power-sharing in the region, which has been without an assembly since January.

The DUP has opposed calls by Sinn Féin, Ireland and the EU for Northern Ireland to remain in the EU customs union and single market as a way of achieving an invisible border with Ireland.

The party’s position could amount to another roadblock in Brexit negotiations. Its view will be of critical importance to any new Brexit proposals by May on Northern Ireland, as it is propping up the Tory minority government after striking a £1bn confidence supply deal after the general election.

Meanwhile, MPs were told on Monday that senior civil servants had few contingency plans for managing the Northern Irish border after Brexit because of a political stalemate between London and Dublin.

Mandarins questioned about preparations for the UK’s borders by the public accounts committee said they could not draw up scenarios until ministers have moved forward.

Appearing before the parliamentary spending watchdog on Monday, HMRC officials were asked how they would monitor the movement of goods and services at 300 crossing points along the border.

Karen Wheeler, HMRC’s director general, said: “That area is not within the scope that we have been working on in the border planning group because the arrangements on Ireland are still subject to negotiations and ministerial discussions.”

Jon Thompson, HMRC’s chief executive, added: “We need the process to go a bit further forward before we can fully understand it.”

Meg Hillier, the committee chair, asked when they would be able to draw up different scenarios when there was such a “fuzzy plan” around the border.

Thompson said that the government wanted no additional infrastructure or a hard border in Northern Ireland, but added: “We are unable to go any further on that because of the political process.”

Clare Moriarty, Defra’s permanent secretary, reinforced Thompson’s assessment, adding that government officials could not pre-empt any deal.

Despite British assertions that there will be no hard border, Dublin has criticised the UK’s position, saying that position is hard to guarantee when the UK is leaving the customs union and the single market. Dublin also doubts a two-year transitional deal for business to adjust to Brexit is long enough.

MPs on the committee grew exasperated with what appeared to be a lack of planning from government departments for future border arrangements.

Conservative member Geoffrey Clifton-Brown asked Wheeler why her department had few additional contingency plans for delays at “roll on, roll off” ports such as Dover, when additional two-minute delays could quickly lead to 17-mile tail backs.

Wheeler said the department was working on the assumption that the UK would not be introducing that type of delay. Clifton-Brown replied that they may have to introduce additional lorry parks: “You may not be able to avoid it ... Isn’t this something you need to address now?”

Sir Amyas Morse, the head of the National Audit Office, asked how long HMRC would have to rely upon such an assumption before finding the capacity to introduce contingency measures.

Wheeler replied: “I don’t have an answer for how long that situation will last for because there will be a number of things that will have to happen.”

11
General discussion / Re: Death Notices
« on: November 21, 2017, 09:48:02 AM »
Ah that's crap news. Did she keep the illness quiet?

I think it had been covered in the news a couple of years ago when she was first diagnosed?

12
General discussion / Re: Death Notices
« on: November 21, 2017, 09:47:08 AM »
There is a semblance of a point to Tony’s argument here.. His jokes are shite almost all the time pathetic even but were they said about different people or even by someone other than Tony they’d pass by almost unnoticed.

There a fair bit of playing the man not the ball going on..

I agree.  There's a fair bit of "neck winding in" required here too.  Let's face it, the comment may have failed the first rule of comedy i.e. it wasn't funny, but there's a queue forming here to see who can be the first to be offended and who can be most offended.

13
Michael O'Neill to Scotland?  On the face if it, it makes sense.  More money, he lives in Scotland and maybe has taken NI as far as he can?

14
General discussion / Re: The Official World Cup 2018 Thread
« on: November 16, 2017, 12:00:30 PM »
Brazil, England, Egypt, Serbia would be a tasty group.

15
General discussion / Re: The IRISH RUGBY thread
« on: November 15, 2017, 04:56:19 PM »
1979 million people went to Phoenix Park to see the Pope, half a million to Galway, hundreds of thousands to Cork and Dundalk all in a few days and was managed ok... it would have been sorted... but not to be so let's get over it   8)

Some crowd alright.  I was in Galway myself, there were only 712 million there.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 187