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Messages - Lar Naparka

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1
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: February 22, 2019, 12:39:14 AM »
My brother has a lad on Dublin development U15 panel, and last year they beat Offaly by some ridiculous score, 15-10 to 0-2 , or something along those lines. Scary stuff. But Kilmacud Crokes probably have as a big a pick as Offaly these days.

Given the numbers and the efforts by the (volunteer!) coaches, Dublin seriously underachieve at minor. Thankfully really! I think itís probably down to not having a settled line up until just before. Itís very hard to predict what the minor team will be prior to the first championship game, because of the large pick. I honestly never much care about minor All Irelands, unless iíve a clubman on the team.  For me, the most important, is the couple of lads each year who might improve the senior team.

With all the threads about the Dubs, it is funny that thereís never any talk on the board about what other counties can do to copy Kerry. Their recent minor success is absolutely amazing. What can other counties do to try and replicate it?
God almighty, imagine the crying if Dubs were achieving at minor!

You see this is what it leads to. I've been saying it for years. What do you think other counties are going to do to try to keep up? Invest huge money themselves! Some have done it at senior level with varying degrees of success. Others, like Kerry have tried to emulate Dublin's method, player creation is the key. Where does that leave us? Only counties with money can compete! That's the road we're going down. That's why this is such an important issue and one we have to tackle now. Look already at the calls for the b championship. That's the beginning of the end for Gaelic football in many counties. It'll be like hurling!

25 of those counties never kept up...
That's fair enough. I remember Jimmy Grey, the club chairman,  saying when the controversy over the proposed Dublin Metro erupted, that upwards of 2,000 youngsters used the club's facilities. That's an unbelievable number but Jimmy is a gentleman and I wouldn't doubt his word.
I have also heard of a junior club (Rathmines Gaels?) that was protesting at City Council plans to take away their only pitch, which is out somewhere in Inchicore. According to their spokesman, they had 400 kids involved. Again, the number is amazing. I can also see why the junor club needs extra help but Na Finna is not in the same category, IMO.
They already have the pitches and changing rooms and most of their activities are internal games. They also depend on selfless volunteers to organise and coach the underage players. Do they need the same per capita grant aid as does the junior club? I often think that Dublin's volunteer coaches perform a massive baby sitting service for busy mums and disinterested dads all over Dublin.
To see what I mean, take a good look at the hordes of kiddies, running about an generally having a thoroughly enjoyable experience.
Then try to viualise the number that will still be around at senior level. Better still, how many would you expect to be still active club members at minor level or , say, u15  and other age levels you care to think of? There is a frightening haemorrhage of members as the age levels increase.
Why is this?
If you were looking at the number of children involved in most rural clubs at  weekends, you'd be lucky to count thirty or thereabouts. Yet the percentage of those who will stay with their clubs and become active members of their community will be far higher. Again, the reason for this should be fairly obvious to all.

They are a hurling renting off a football club. Football club is selling land and telling them to do one. Nothing to do with the council.

But you have hit the nail on the head. The money is going to middle class superclubs who currently provide a better babysitting service than soccer or rugby. But retention is poor, at 15 they are playing different sports. But look at the Dublin teams, mostly from.affluent areas. So its partially working, but risky.
I read about this club in one of the tabloids so Iím not surprised that the article had a gaffe or two.
Yah, there is a big drop out around 15 when young bucks tend to start losing the run of themselves whenever they see young wans knocking about. Thatís common in all sports but the problem is worse with the Gah because of the lack of opportunity to play at a higher level in many cases.
Take my nephew and his mates for instance. A gang of  then played with Ballyboden quite happily from about 8 or 9 up to the end their u14th. year.
Then, at least one of them didnít get notified when training for the u15s commenced. Nothing..zilch..sweet FA.
When they found out the reason why, and they had to ask before they were told, all of them decided to pack it in. The neff took it badly and ever since, at least 10 years later, heís prefer to go to Hell than Ballyboden in any shape or form.
That is not an isolated instance, btw. I have heard of far too many kids where the same thing has happened and will continue to happen. Itís all very well to talk about quality above quantity but this can cause a lot of heartbreak and besides, runs counter to the ethos of the GAA.

2
GAA Discussion / Re: NFL Division 1 2019 Dubs again?
« on: February 22, 2019, 12:13:47 AM »
Surprised Diarmuid and Kevin McLoughlin aren't there assuming they're fit? I would have kept Michael Plunkett at centre half back as well.

Surely Horan will still have his customary 2-3 changes before throw-in
He probably will and I still don't see why he should persist with this as there are few changes he could make anyway. On the positive side, he seems to be happy with the progress of the four relative newcomers.
All of them appear to be made of the right stuff too and, for the first time in years, Mayo appear to have some serious new talent emerging. Hope they keep up the good work!
Interesting also that none of them are backs.  Good forwards and hen's teeth are about equal in number when scarcity is mentioned.  I'd expect the Dubs to win once again but it's  really hard to predict what Mayo are capable of.
The backs are the old reliables but age may be a problem here. The same applies to Donie at midfield. So we will be heavily dependent on the forward, some old and some new, very new.
Hope Bob can avoid his customary clanger. I tend to keep the cheeks of me arse clenched from start to finish whenever he plays.  ;D
Arra, we will just have to wait and see...

3
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: February 21, 2019, 05:37:34 PM »
My brother has a lad on Dublin development U15 panel, and last year they beat Offaly by some ridiculous score, 15-10 to 0-2 , or something along those lines. Scary stuff. But Kilmacud Crokes probably have as a big a pick as Offaly these days.

Given the numbers and the efforts by the (volunteer!) coaches, Dublin seriously underachieve at minor. Thankfully really! I think itís probably down to not having a settled line up until just before. Itís very hard to predict what the minor team will be prior to the first championship game, because of the large pick. I honestly never much care about minor All Irelands, unless iíve a clubman on the team.  For me, the most important, is the couple of lads each year who might improve the senior team.

With all the threads about the Dubs, it is funny that thereís never any talk on the board about what other counties can do to copy Kerry. Their recent minor success is absolutely amazing. What can other counties do to try and replicate it?
God almighty, imagine the crying if Dubs were achieving at minor!

You see this is what it leads to. I've been saying it for years. What do you think other counties are going to do to try to keep up? Invest huge money themselves! Some have done it at senior level with varying degrees of success. Others, like Kerry have tried to emulate Dublin's method, player creation is the key. Where does that leave us? Only counties with money can compete! That's the road we're going down. That's why this is such an important issue and one we have to tackle now. Look already at the calls for the b championship. That's the beginning of the end for Gaelic football in many counties. It'll be like hurling!

25 of those counties never kept up...
That's fair enough. I remember Jimmy Grey, the club chairman,  saying when the controversy over the proposed Dublin Metro erupted, that upwards of 2,000 youngsters used the club's facilities. That's an unbelievable number but Jimmy is a gentleman and I wouldn't doubt his word.
I have also heard of a junior club (Rathmines Gaels?) that was protesting at City Council plans to take away their only pitch, which is out somewhere in Inchicore. According to their spokesman, they had 400 kids involved. Again, the number is amazing. I can also see why the junor club needs extra help but Na Finna is not in the same category, IMO.
They already have the pitches and changing rooms and most of their activities are internal games. They also depend on selfless volunteers to organise and coach the underage players. Do they need the same per capita grant aid as does the junior club? I often think that Dublin's volunteer coaches perform a massive baby sitting service for busy mums and disinterested dads all over Dublin.
To see what I mean, take a good look at the hordes of kiddies, running about an generally having a thoroughly enjoyable experience.
Then try to viualise the number that will still be around at senior level. Better still, how many would you expect to be still active club members at minor level or , say, u15  and other age levels you care to think of? There is a frightening haemorrhage of members as the age levels increase.
Why is this?
If you were looking at the number of children involved in most rural clubs at  weekends, you'd be lucky to count thirty or thereabouts. Yet the percentage of those who will stay with their clubs and become active members of their community will be far higher. Again, the reason for this should be fairly obvious to all.


4
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: February 21, 2019, 04:06:43 PM »
Again, youíre just not listening because youíve no interest in listening.

Did Cluxton go from talented hot head to the best keeper of all time because of money?
Itís moronic nonsense to even suggest it. First, he copped himself on. Second, he worked his arse off so his god given talent could give the results that came. Heís an absolute freak of a man. A genius. A nutter. A hero. Money was and is completely and utterly irrelevant.

Weíd no reliable freetaker in the pre Gilroy years. Mossy Quinn, Wayne McCarthy, Johnny McNally, Ray Cosgrove and a few more were all given the job, and were all not quite reliable enough. Almost impossible to win an All Ireland without a good freetaker.
I guarantee that no player in Ireland has put more practice into freetaking that Dean Rock. Living and working in Dublin has helped that considerably. Money has been irrelevant.
Weíd no reliable full back for a good few years too. Trying the likes of Barry Cahill and Denis Bastick there!
But then came along Rory OíCarroll to make an enormous difference. Money again irrelevant.

New tactics from Gavin has allowed us to get away with playing 3 corner backs since Rory moved away. I also think opposition managers may have missed a trick in not going after what I think has been Dublinís biggest weakness these last few years.

The GDOs have had practically zero influence on all Dublin hurlers and footballers. As Iíve said, our lads do get looked after very well, as do Mayo, Kerry, Kilkenny, Limerick and others. And weíve no travel.

We have an amazing bunch of players and the crop is only growing due to population, not money. But boy, weíre going to miss Clucko when heís gone, and I doubt the next guy up after Rock will be as prolific.

It's the other way round, you're not listening because you don't want to.

I've heard all these excuses before. The money isn't irrelevant, Cluxton is irrelevant. Was he not a genius prior to 2011? Along came a host of new players from the production line. Look up your defence from that year, that's what won you that All Ireland.

Again, these players you are talking about came through the system! They were created by top class coaching. That includes Rock, O'Carroll and a host of others. You can't have a highly financed elite player pathway put in place on one hand and then denying it had anything to do with creating elite level players on the other!

Apart from actually creating top class talent, having your underage system bankrolled has freed up funds for other areas. Hiring a professional basketball coach is one area that has paid dividends. Having a whole list of other paid coaches and backroom staff also helps.

I have provided tables which show exactly what paid coaches and a highly financed system can bring to a county. I see you've ignored the club one I just posted. Ignoring it won't make it go away. Denying millions upon millions of euro has had a huge effect on Dublin GAA is like claiming black is white.
The elite player pathway has NOTHING to do with the millions in games development funding.
Unpaid ex-player volunteers coach the Dublin development panels. GDOs donít go next nor near them.
Yes, they are well looked after with meal plans, dieticians, etc but same as many other counties.
And if they get to senior panel, thereís a plethora of coaches, and some of them are getting well paid, but again same as Kerry, Mayo, etc, although iíd say we have more and pay more, but again totally irrelevant to the GDO funds which goes to clubs

If the GDO funding stopped, it wouldnít impact one iota on the funding for the elite teams. Completely different pots. If the GDO funding stopped, weíd just halve the number of GDOs, clubs would likely band together to have one between two.

Club game is flourishing in Dublin. As I said, itís a numbers games.  More players, more members, more contributions, so super facilities. Huge numbers of volunteer coaches.  Very good organization of club games in the county (exception being the U21s). We have most of the biggest clubs in the country, clubs with huge picks, will inevitably win many club AllIrelands over the next decade in both codes.
On a very serious note, can you say where the millions spent on games development is actually going?
It certainly isnít being spent on coaching kids in primary schools.
I am not saying there is a fiddle of any sort here but I can see any obvious signs of large sums of money being spent on anything to do with kidsí coaching/playing.

5
GAA Discussion / Re: Money, Dublin and the GAA
« on: February 21, 2019, 03:58:13 PM »
Pricey you should just stop. You whinge about Dublin and their successes but as everyone points out you haven't put forward any plan for how you would spend the money. That's like punishing New Zealand for being consistently brilliant a rugby. Your fantasy world approach seems to be give everyone loads of money and dont give dublin anymore without any oversight or plan in place as how it should be invested. That doesn't have a history of working well in Ireland.

You've probably been too busy stalking the Dublin football team training in DCU so far this year to notice, but the on going fiasco in this country in relation to building the children's hospital is what happens when you just throw money at something without a clear plan and leadership.

 ;D The Dubs are just pathetic, a never ending stream of deflection! But since you brought it up, I will give you a brief outline of the plan.

Firstly, the monster must be slain. Dublin gets split into the 4 counties, Fingal, Dublin city, South Dublin, Dun Laoighaire/Rathdown.

Similar to what Dublin got, every county gets a strategic development officer and various other officers answering to them.

A development plan is drawn up for each county. What problems each county face, how to deal with them, how to promote the game, how to increase playing numbers, how to increase competitivity in both codes and so on.

All counties will be given appropriate funding to implement the plans drawn up.

The development officers will have targets to reach and progress will be monitored.

That's just a brief outline. It would ensure all counties compete on an equal footing. It would be fair and equatable.

What is stopping any of this happening now in the other 31?

You can't implement a plan like this without finance! It's as simple as that. It wouldn't have worked in Dublin without the huge resources pumped in and it won't work anywhere else. Counties have gone to HQ with plans to improve their development and have had the door slammed in their faces. It's time we claimed our games back from the money men. Whatever way we go about it, we can't continue on the path we're on. It's destroying Gaelic games in many counties.

Now you are being special. Dublin did the much mocked Blue Wave document and then got funding.

Name one county that had 'the door slammed in their faces'?
I think the problem with Dublin's high level of funding goes back to 2004 at least. I donít know enough about this to say itís true or false but the subject has come up here many times before.
Di any other county have the door slammed in its face when they went knocking for extra grants money? Several did, if you were to go by complaints that have been posted on this board.

6
GAA Discussion / Re: NFL Division 1 2019 Dubs again?
« on: February 21, 2019, 02:59:07 PM »

Here's what you said, Lar:

How many Dublin club players drop out of the game before they would wish because of the lack of opportunity to advance to at least one higher level?
IMO, that's the real tragedy.

Here's what I said back:

All this concern for Dublin players who drop out because of sheer numbers is very touching.  Not sure how I managed to miss it all back when we weren't  winning.


Neither one of us mentioned the county game in regards to when players drop out.

You said 'tragedy', about Dublin players dropping out.  If that isn't expressing an opinion, then I give up.  Maybe English isn't your first language?

 

There's lots of good arguments to be had about Dublin's advantages, but this one--players losing out-- is just disingenuous.
You are dead right; I did express a fairly definite opinion but that was in the post you replied to and your response missed my points completely. When you said ďNot sure how I managed to miss it all back when we weren't  winning,Ē I gave up.
I thought I had gone to sufficient lengths to say what would happen if Dublin was split into its constituent counties and the benefits in player involvement that would mean to the GAA. I was careful to avoid saying I was sorry for anyone- either Dublin players or the rest of the country.
I thought I was using elementary maths and that there was no scope for error i n my conclusions. Of all culchies on this board, I have emphasised again and again that I have no time for moaning about Dublinís share of the development funding or any other advantages Dublin have, some real and some imagined, over all others.
The place to do this is at county board level. I also believe that it is unrealistic to expect Dublin to cede anything- turkeys donít vote for Christmas and all thatÖ.
I donít have concern for DUblin players losing out and never said I had --I was just giving figureds and itís up to everyone else to draw their own conclusions.
However, on the personal front, concentrating on quality at the expense f quantity is the opposite of everything I believe in and this is definitely what club football in Dublin is designed for.
I am coming from a background of decades of involvement with primary schoolsí football in Dublin and I have had first hand experience of what I am talking about. Talking about great things to come as GDO coaches go out to entice kids to get involved in GAA activities is like trying to teach yer granny to suck eggs. Itís well intentioned but extremely naive. If teachers on the ground in every boysí school in Dublin couldnít manage to widen the playing base, then whatís the odds that outsiders can succeed where the likes of me failed.
I mentioned before about the time my sixth class felt Gah was a pansy's game and they could bate the socks off any team theyíd take on. A few played for the school team but most hadnít a clue about the game and cared even less either..
However with a few basic ground rules, they were ready to take on all comers.
In short, they plastered the other sixth class, then the school team and every other school in the parish that accepted the challenge. Then they wanted to have a go at the Isles u-12s and no bother to my gang, they knew sweet damn all about packed defences or playing sweepers or that sort of stuff.
They played for the sheer enjoyment and the fun of playing with their pals and every single one of the 30 in the class had some part to play, if youíll pardon the pun. They were fast running out of opposition as the end of the school year was coming up so I asked the manager of the Whitehall club to accept  a challenge. We knocked the smirk off his face without a bother!
They were playing with their pales and they knew and trusted their manager and they played for the sheer fun of it. Not a single one opted to play football with Isles or any other Gaelic club after they finished primary school and if I couldnít persuade anyone to stay at the game, I donít fancy the odds of any outsider doing better.There was a strong bond of friendship and trust between everyone and playing the game was played for the right reasons.
Now, when I say I see problems with the way the GDO system is organised, I am speaking from experience. Furthermore when I talk about Dublin losing its market share of the player and spectator market, I am not talking about bums on seats in Croker.
If you go by census returns, ( here I go again!) the population of Dublin increased by 21% over a 20 year period from 1996 to 2016. Has the numbers playing increased by the same amount? Has the numbers involved at club level increased by 21% either?
If the senior side wasnít grabbing the highlights now, thereís be a lot less than there was 20 years ago.

7
All this concern for Dublin players who drop out because of sheer numbers is very touching.  Not sure how I managed to miss it all back when we weren't  winning.
Never heard of The Blue Wave initiative or the fact that Dublin gets enough of the coaching development kitty that could pay the wages of a dictator in yer average banana republic?

Nothing to do with what he said though. Suddenly the fans of 31 counties want us broken up to give the nearlymen a shot at county football. Thats new.
Yer dead right. Thatís because he didnít bother to read what I had to say. Neither may I gently suggest have you. If he wants to know why culchies are upset about Dublin's recent dominance anf thinks its all down to pure jealousy, then he seems to knww nothing about the Blue Wave or what way development funds are disbursed.
I just gave facts and figures- nothing magical in that. Anyone with some basic maths would come up with the same results. I never said I felt sorry or glad for those who could play intercounty football if Dublin was split along county boundaries. Thatís up to Dublin GAA folks but it does mean you are getting along with a very small percentage of the general population and you need all the money you can lay your hands on in order to stay afloat, never mind increase your market share.
The Gah in Dublin is under severe pressure and needs all the cash thatís going but thatís because of the basket case way your club structure is organised.
Now, that is an opinion but itís based on facts and figures I have posted now and in the past and I will stand over what I am saying.
Unless there is radical change within the association and sooner rather than later, the whole shebang is gonna go tits up.

Hold on, make your mind up. Dublin GAA is a shambles in imminent danger of collapse or a superfinded juggernaut going to win everything for years. Pick one, it cant be both.

Or, you are rei forcing the point that all this is is the whining of culchie thicks who would rather hurl from the ditch than roll up tbe sleeves amd do what Dublin did.
Can't be both?  Oh, yes it can!
It takes increasing chunks of grant money to keep the show on the road. If we were talking about a business venture here, the receivers would have been called in long ago. A bit of basic maths tells its own story.
Okay then, since you insist. Hereís the population figures for the Dublin region, based on the census returns of 2016 and 1996, (1,345,000 and 1,058,000 respectively.)
That, by any metric you like, marks a general increase of over 21%.
Has the number of Dublin GAA players increased by anything near that percentage? What about the number of clubs?
I can only think of one new club in that period, (Tyrellstown) and that is struggling for survival. Has general attendance figures gone up 21% in that twenty years?
Unless you can give a definite Yes to those questions, the reality is that Dublin GAA is losing its market share.
On the specifics, Tallaght has a population roughly the same as County Cavan, about 76,000. Tallaght has just one Gaelic club, St. Marks and that hurling. Cavan has a total of 33. There is no way Tallaght has the same percentage of the population involved in GAA affairs as the culchies of Cavan has and the same can be said for the entire Dublin region- all have tiny numbers of the population bothering their arses about Gaelic affairs, club or county.
I donít want to go on and on about facts and figures, they could wreck a head of cabbage. But they may be dry but donít tell lies

Firstly there are at least 4 clubs in Tallaght. One was in the news a lot about 10 years ago.

But the rest proves my point. Dublin is a very difficult place for the GAA to operate. We are way befind soccer numbers and reach wise, and much as I hate rugby country nonsense, they are growing into working class areas fanwise. So we target kids and then put a structure round those who show talent. And this is the conveyor belt. We will never have huge participation, so why bother. Quality over quantity.

My issue is the traditional areas, like my own, have been left behind to target rugby areas and a better class of parent, but i see the logic.

How much of that 21% are Dubs? And yes, overall crowds are way higher than 20 years ago.

Are we losing market share? Last two years, yes. But for the previous 10 the juggernaut was huge. Now lifelong fans are bored and thats not all Dublins fault. Nonsense like the super 8s hit crowds across the board. So if crowds are wobblling with a magnificent team, what will happen if you make them worse? Be careful what you wish for.
I guess the club you are referring to is Thomas Davis and the spat it got into with Shamrock Rovers and the city council over the proposed used of the soccer adium that had been half built in Tallaght.
I imagine Davis, along with Annes Bohernabreena and Ballyboden all draw members from the Tallaght area but, I don't imagine the rank and file in any of them would push the Tallaght connection.
Technically, Bohernabreena is part of Tallaght but the rank and file there donít associate with Tallaght in any way. Just as the residents of Broombridge and that general area would have no affinity with Erinís Isle but in fact they are within the traditional Finglas boundary. AS you donít have parish limits in Dublin, I canít say for certain that any players from that side of the Tolka river play for Oliver Plunkettís but itíís odds-on that they do.
I am pretty serious about what Iíve been saying about the weaknesses in the Dublin club structures. (Okay, maybe a bit of messing, once in a while.)
In the main, I am going by the findings of the Strategic Review Committee, set up in 2002. (Canít be 100% of the date the report was issued.) The main remit of the committee members was to identify the reason for the very high dropout rate amongst Dublin juvenile layers and to come up with a solution.
There were two main findings; one was that there was a lack of opportunity to continue playing for all but the best as kids grew older. The other was of equal importance; the lack of a community involvement. (I didnít phrase that well, I know.) Take the club I am most familiar with. Erinís Isle. It draws its juvenile members from the local primary schools in the Finglas region.
Nothing wrong with that I suppose but for one thing:
the rivalry, indeed animosity, between schoolkids can be pretty intense and it deters many youngsters from playing club football unless they have a number of their school pals along with them. The fuss erupted when the committee recommended that County Dublin be split in two put paid to all committee recommendations. The report was quietly shelved but the problems still remain and are getting worse.

Most country clubs are glad to have all the young players they have staying on as they get older and the number of teams a club fields grew fewer. In Dublin the reverse is true. I believe that in Dublin club football only the best can continue playing on to at an adult level because of a lack of opportunity to do so.
 Sure, young players in any code will stop playing for a good number of reasons and this is not unique to Dublin club football. However, in Dublin some clubs can field more underage players than the combined total of many counties but there is little or no cases where lads have to opt out because there is no room for them at higher age levels.

8
I've no problem with any player getting the free use of cars from anybody and that includes all Dublin lads too, by the way. In general.all concerned are brand ambassadors for some business or other and they get the use of a new car for a year or some advertising work. If the player concerned helps make money/ generate a positive image for the company concerned, then there is a mutually satisfactory agreement in place and what's wrong with that?
On a slightly different tack, I can understand the Gooch using his exploits with Kerry to generate a few handy bob for himself and frig the begrudgers!

9
All this concern for Dublin players who drop out because of sheer numbers is very touching.  Not sure how I managed to miss it all back when we weren't  winning.
Never heard of The Blue Wave initiative or the fact that Dublin gets enough of the coaching development kitty that could pay the wages of a dictator in yer average banana republic?

Nothing to do with what he said though. Suddenly the fans of 31 counties want us broken up to give the nearlymen a shot at county football. Thats new.
Yer dead right. Thatís because he didnít bother to read what I had to say. Neither may I gently suggest have you. If he wants to know why culchies are upset about Dublin's recent dominance anf thinks its all down to pure jealousy, then he seems to knww nothing about the Blue Wave or what way development funds are disbursed.
I just gave facts and figures- nothing magical in that. Anyone with some basic maths would come up with the same results. I never said I felt sorry or glad for those who could play intercounty football if Dublin was split along county boundaries. Thatís up to Dublin GAA folks but it does mean you are getting along with a very small percentage of the general population and you need all the money you can lay your hands on in order to stay afloat, never mind increase your market share.
The Gah in Dublin is under severe pressure and needs all the cash thatís going but thatís because of the basket case way your club structure is organised.
Now, that is an opinion but itís based on facts and figures I have posted now and in the past and I will stand over what I am saying.
Unless there is radical change within the association and sooner rather than later, the whole shebang is gonna go tits up.

Hold on, make your mind up. Dublin GAA is a shambles in imminent danger of collapse or a superfinded juggernaut going to win everything for years. Pick one, it cant be both.

Or, you are rei forcing the point that all this is is the whining of culchie thicks who would rather hurl from the ditch than roll up tbe sleeves amd do what Dublin did.
Can't be both?  Oh, yes it can!
It takes increasing chunks of grant money to keep the show on the road. If we were talking about a business venture here, the receivers would have been called in long ago. A bit of basic maths tells its own story.
Okay then, since you insist. Hereís the population figures for the Dublin region, based on the census returns of 2016 and 1996, (1,345,000 and 1,058,000 respectively.)
That, by any metric you like, marks a general increase of over 21%.
Has the number of Dublin GAA players increased by anything near that percentage? What about the number of clubs?
I can only think of one new club in that period, (Tyrellstown) and that is struggling for survival. Has general attendance figures gone up 21% in that twenty years?
Unless you can give a definite Yes to those questions, the reality is that Dublin GAA is losing its market share.
On the specifics, Tallaght has a population roughly the same as County Cavan, about 76,000. Tallaght has just one Gaelic club, St. Marks and that hurling. Cavan has a total of 33. There is no way Tallaght has the same percentage of the population involved in GAA affairs as the culchies of Cavan has and the same can be said for the entire Dublin region- all have tiny numbers of the population bothering their arses about Gaelic affairs, club or county.
I donít want to go on and on about facts and figures, they could wreck a head of cabbage. But they may be dry but donít tell lies

10
All this concern for Dublin players who drop out because of sheer numbers is very touching.  Not sure how I managed to miss it all back when we weren't  winning.
Never heard of The Blue Wave initiative or the fact that Dublin gets enough of the coaching development kitty that could pay the wages of a dictator in yer average banana republic?

Nothing to do with what he said though. Suddenly the fans of 31 counties want us broken up to give the nearlymen a shot at county football. Thats new.
Yer dead right. Thatís because he didnít bother to read what I had to say. Neither may I gently suggest have you. If he wants to know why culchies are upset about Dublin's recent dominance anf thinks its all down to pure jealousy, then he seems to knww nothing about the Blue Wave or what way development funds are disbursed.
I just gave facts and figures- nothing magical in that. Anyone with some basic maths would come up with the same results. I never said I felt sorry or glad for those who could play intercounty football if Dublin was split along county boundaries. Thatís up to Dublin GAA folks but it does mean you are getting along with a very small percentage of the general population and you need all the money you can lay your hands on in order to stay afloat, never mind increase your market share.
The Gah in Dublin is under severe pressure and needs all the cash thatís going but thatís because of the basket case way your club structure is organised.
Now, that is an opinion but itís based on facts and figures I have posted now and in the past and I will stand over what I am saying.
Unless there is radical change within the association and sooner rather than later, the whole shebang is gonna go tits up.

11
General discussion / Re: This Person Does Not Exist
« on: February 18, 2019, 02:58:39 PM »
https://thispersondoesnotexist.com/

Every time you refresh the page AI generated image of a person who does not exist.

Something a little upsetting seeing the faces of people who do not exist.
Sometimes its even more upsetting seeing faces of people who unfortunately do exist!

12
Westmeath have only won 1 Leinster title in their history.
Laois have won 6 and Kildare have won 23. Kildare won in 1998 and 2000, but you have to back to the 50s for their next one. Big bad dubs weren't dominating for 50 years.

In terms of stadiums the dubs are actually a good example for county boards. Uild smaller ground that wil be full for games rather than huge stadiums that are totally unnecessary. Munster alone has 40k seater stadiums in Limerick, Thurles and now Cork. That's madness. If they're lucky they'll be full once maybe twice a year.

I'd like to see dubs build  20k ground in association with the IRFU so they could groundshare with Leinster and for once the taxpayers in this country could get value for money for large  state investment in a capital sports project. Unfortunately the dinosaurs who are in charge of GAA and attend congress will never agree to this. You only look at the outrage over "getting bullied" into allowing a charity soccer match in PuC this year (only time it was full) and the hassle trying to allow soccer/rugby in croke park on a temporary basis.
Some good points there . Back around the time the Gah allowed rugby and soccer interests to use Croke Park, there were some serious discussions between the Croke and Aviva heads to discuss sharing stadia. It seems the Landsdowne Road folks were looking for Croker for Six Nations and other games where there was likely to be a crowd in excess of what Aviva was going to hold. The GAA would then use the Aviva where a crowd less than 50% of Croke Park's capacity was anticipated.
I was surprised to learn that Croke Park was losing money any time it  opened and there was less than 30,000 in attendance. Obviously negotiations broke down somewhere along the line as nothing more has been heard about this since then. There wasn't a lot of publicity about the plan either but it was carried briefly in a few newspapers.

13
GAA Discussion / Re: NFL Division 1 2019 Dubs again?
« on: February 16, 2019, 09:24:54 PM »
The Dubs will never understand the logistics in getting U20 players home from college to train and senior panellists home who go to college and work in Dublin

and the costs involved.

This thread started out ostensibly as the place at which the 2019 NFL Division 1 might be discussed - and with this being the most open Div. 1 for a number of years youíd think thereíd be plenty to discuss. But surprise, surprise like so many threads on this board begrudgery takes over.

Remember lads Dublin are sitting in sixth position in Division 1. Surely that alone should encourage more positive discussion and less of the ďpoor usĒ whinging.
I agree with you - on this one at any rate. I generally don't go in for moaning either. I don't blame the Dubs for being so far in front of every other team in the and. You will recall that I once said turkeys can't be expected to vote for Christmas or something along those lines.
If dudes from other counties object, the people to get onto are their own county boards and find out why they are prepared to be pushed aside without a whimper.
There are a good few Dublin heads who need a reality check also. Some keep on asking the same f***ing questions over and over.
 Take yer man Jell O Biafra for example. I mentioned the figures involved if Dublin was to be split in four- along modern county lines. So he comes back with something like where was my concern for players who were denied  chance to play at intercounty level when Dublin wasn't winning all around them?
What the  feck has that got to do with what I wrote?
I didn't express my opinion, neither good nor bad. Anyone could use the same basic arithmetic and would have to come to the same conclusion as I did.
I'm not mad or anything like that but I am confused. It seems a good few Dublin heads didn't learn English as their first language and that for once is my personal opinion.
They don't have a total monopoly on stupidity on here either but that's irrelevant also. ;D

14
All this concern for Dublin players who drop out because of sheer numbers is very touching.  Not sure how I managed to miss it all back when we weren't  winning.
Never heard of The Blue Wave initiative or the fact that Dublin gets enough of the coaching development kitty that could pay the wages of a dictator in yer average banana republic?

15
GAA Discussion / Re: the GAA's supercrisis and the 2018 annual Report
« on: February 16, 2019, 10:34:36 AM »

why aren't the teachers doing PE?
they are paid to teach it
Agreed!

The still get PE off the teachers mostly, but the teacher gets a free class when the GAA lad arrives for a session for their class.

My kids went to the very same school I did and the standard of PE I got was miles better.

Often 30 kids standing around in a hall waiting minutes for a ball to be thrown to you! Or a small beanbag so everyone had a good chance of making a catch!
You need to ask their school why the PE is crap
Our local school has no hall or pitch yet the teachers get them out at least once a week
Officially, PE is a recognised subject on the school curriculum. So each school class is supposed to devote a fixed section of the class timetable to the subject. Each teacher is expected to have a Plean Scoile or school (work) plan for each week.
By the way, devoting the whole time to Gah coaching every week wouldn't rate as a balanced PE program!
Arrangements can be made to bring in specialist coaches for PE ( bit of a joke at times) where those employed  used to be FAS employees. The only time I was persuaded to get outsiders in to lessen my load, I got saddled with two gum-chewing young wans who hadn't a clue about anything to do with sport of any sort. They also called kids by their last names which didn't go down well with my lot. So the first visit was also the last.
Okay, so I have a biased view of what outside help officially means. Schools can also make plans with GAA coaches from local clubs or whatever to come in for coaching sessions. That should, officially at least, be outside of school hours but like so many other aspects of teaching, teachers can have a lot of leeway here and I know of cases where schools and clubs pick the times best suited for both and that can involved the last part of the school day.
Farr may be able to say if there has been any recent updates to this policy but I think I would have heard of it if there was any in Dublin.
One further note, I dunno where the sums allegedly spent of coaching development in Dublin is going but it sure ain't being spent on primary school kids and that's for sure.


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