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Messages - Dinny Breen

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1
General discussion / Re: INSURANCE
« on: December 05, 2019, 03:13:48 PM »
Athy Rugby Club in Kildare can't get any Public Liability Insurance because of previous and outstanding claims against them, all non-rugby related. Running the serious risk of having to shutdown if not resolved in the next week.

This is a worry for every sports club in the country with their own grounds.

How does GAA Public Liability insurance work?
Could the IRFU not sort it out?

You would like to think so but the IFRU's primary focus is the professional game. Not sure they would have any governance around this type of scenario.

2
General discussion / Re: INSURANCE
« on: December 05, 2019, 11:51:16 AM »
Athy Rugby Club in Kildare can't get any Public Liability Insurance because of previous and outstanding claims against them, all non-rugby related. Running the serious risk of having to shutdown if not resolved in the next week.

This is a worry for every sports club in the country with their own grounds.

How does GAA Public Liability insurance work?

3
GAA Discussion / Re: County Manager Merry go round
« on: December 04, 2019, 09:32:22 AM »
Former Kerry team nutritionist and Listowel native Kevin Beasley has now joined the Donegal Management Team.
He was highly respected with the Kerry players during Eamon Fitzmaurice time in charge.
How did Peter Keane let this highly rated nutritionist leave Kerry to go North ?
Also Kerry Senior Team expenses went from 353,294 in 2018 to 534,883 in 2019 ... is it all the steak (well done) they are eating ?

That sounds insane...

4
GAA Discussion / Re: Jim Gavin
« on: November 30, 2019, 06:24:32 PM »
A game changer for Dublin.

Brilliant manager.

Opens up the 2020 Championship a little...

5
GAA Discussion / Re: CPA Pull out of Fixtures Review Task Force
« on: November 28, 2019, 11:26:25 AM »
Just because you're a genuine GAA person doesn't mean your ideas are any good.
Very much this.

Iíll repeat ad infinitum that there is no solution to the current fixtures impasse until the culture of postponing games until county players return, is reversed.

What the average club player in Ireland needs from the CPA, more than anything, is leadership in this regard. Leadership who are prepared to recognise the root cause of the problem, and implement the process of acceptance.


óó

It never fails to amuse/amaze me that clubs will dig their heels in for months waiting for Jonny to come back from county commitments, but will carry on regardless with matches when Jonny then buggers off to America after a couple of club training sessions.

Itís a mindset thing. Which means it can be changed with little effort.

I agree 100%

Would no league relegation help change that mentality?

Next year's league standings are decided on this years championship performance? E.g Division 1 2020 would be your championship quarter-finalists from 2019. 8 team division home and away. 14 league games to played through April to July.

6
General discussion / Re: Let's all laugh at Totteringham
« on: November 19, 2019, 08:05:59 PM »

7
GAA Discussion / Re: Player Opt outs for 2020 season
« on: November 19, 2019, 10:40:25 AM »
Mickey Burke, honest as the day is long, always came across as a good egg.

8
GAA Discussion / Re: Underage Grades
« on: November 15, 2019, 03:13:50 PM »
Dinny youíve replied to my comments on why 17 year olds drop out of sport, by citing an article about an under-14 policy in a club falling down with players.

This is not the same thing.

There may be come correlation here, but unless Nemo are also keeping their stronger juvenile players on board as well, and playing junior football while their old teammates  ďjump aheadĒ of them, then itís the same situation anyhow.

You were talking about teenagers when I quoted you not specifically 17 years old. I think your attitude is wrong and symptomatic of why clubs are struggling with numbers. Unless a kid is competitive at x, y, z age he won't play adult sport to me is simply mind boggling. Since when did playing sport solely become about winning? No wonder clubs are dying on their feet.

https://www.limerickleader.ie/news/sport/493869/open-letter-a-young-player-s-view.html

9
GAA Discussion / Re: Underage Grades
« on: November 15, 2019, 11:03:16 AM »
What a lot of you seem to fail to realise is that young players all develop physically, mentally and emotionally at different rates.

Just because a boy or girl doesn't feel that competitive or winning edge at 13 doesn't mean they won't feel it later at 17/18 or 20/21. You complain that you don't have the numbers etc etc but if you don't change your coaching values, your club values and how as a collective you do things, how do expect things to change?

The GAA is suppose to be about community and not only as a pathway to adult sport. Wobbler says he knows after a few Adult B games whether a 17 year old will be playing at 21, a 17 year old who is studying for exams, dealing with hormones, still not physically, emotionally or mentally mature. Have you ever asked yourself why? You need a much broader mind than that.

Dinny what youíre suggesting here is that Iím fuelling this dropout, and my ďnarrow mindĒ is maybe even actively pursuing it.

If so, itís absolute nonsense. These are not actions. They are observations gained from spending 25 years involved at the entry point to adult football.

Someone else suggests that drink and women are the reason for dropouts. Heís wrong. Itís not drink and women thatís the issue. Nor is it age grades. Some people just donít like competitive sport enough to work hard at it. As mentioned before, this does not make them weak, strange, disappointing, cowardly, or unfulfilled. Itís perfectly norma behaviour and is reflected among teenagers in every competitive sport across the world. Itís not a GAA issue. Itís just people being people.

I played with dozens of senior players who partied hard. But theyíd still find a way to make training, and on match days left no quarter given. Because competitive sport was a priority in their life.

When people can accept this simple reality, they can focus on ensuring that players who have that drive are given every opportunity to progress through the ranks, regardless of ability. Clubs will prosper.

This article might give you something to think about, you can change your thinking after 25 years , I wonder where Nemo would be now if they only picked the competitive boys at 13,14,15.....

https://www.irishnews.com/sport/gaafootball/2018/02/22/news/we-don-t-care-if-we-lose-ye-will-all-get-a-game-joe-kavanagh-on-nemo-s-famous-underage-policy-1261352/

10
GAA Discussion / Re: Joe Brolly
« on: November 14, 2019, 01:22:30 PM »
Brolly v Wolly
Ewan McKenna v Eddie O'Sullivan

...Someone explain to me why I'm drawn to going to this. Am I ok?
What is it, Celebrity Death Match??

Spewan outdid himself again this week. Tweeted that Gay Byrne was a "vile pr1ck". Deleted it when he sobered up. Alcoholism may explain some of his problems.

Didn't Ewan's Daddy work for RTE?

Of those 4 I could only tolerate Parkinson. Why is he taking on a Barrister, he'll be destroyed.

Zero interest either way.

11
GAA Discussion / Re: Underage Grades
« on: November 14, 2019, 11:28:07 AM »
What a lot of you seem to fail to realise is that young players all develop physically, mentally and emotionally at different rates.

Just because a boy or girl doesn't feel that competitive or winning edge at 13 doesn't mean they won't feel it later at 17/18 or 20/21. You complain that you don't have the numbers etc etc but if you don't change your coaching values, your club values and how as a collective you do things, how do expect things to change?

The GAA is suppose to be about community and not only as a pathway to adult sport. Wobbler says he knows after a few Adult B games whether a 17 year old will be playing at 21, a 17 year old who is studying for exams, dealing with hormones, still not physically, emotionally or mentally mature. Have you ever asked yourself why? You need a much broader mind than that.

There has been some mad dog sh*t talked in this thread, [some of it by you Dinny which is a surprise as you are usually fairly sensible], but that by Wobbler takes first prize by a country mile.

No of us are sensible, we wouldn't be here if we were.... ;D

12
GAA Discussion / Re: Underage Grades
« on: November 14, 2019, 09:52:02 AM »
What a lot of you seem to fail to realise is that young players all develop physically, mentally and emotionally at different rates.

Just because a boy or girl doesn't feel that competitive or winning edge at 13 doesn't mean they won't feel it later at 17/18 or 20/21. You complain that you don't have the numbers etc etc but if you don't change your coaching values, your club values and how as a collective you do things, how do expect things to change?

The GAA is suppose to be about community and not only as a pathway to adult sport. Wobbler says he knows after a few Adult B games whether a 17 year old will be playing at 21, a 17 year old who is studying for exams, dealing with hormones, still not physically, emotionally or mentally mature. Have you ever asked yourself why? You need a much broader mind than that.


13
GAA Discussion / Re: Underage Grades
« on: November 13, 2019, 02:14:30 PM »
Dinny you make some excellent points in this post. The one however that I would strongly disagree with is the element by which you seem to put a lot of emphasis on not instilling a winning ethos into the underage system.  I personally think that by taking this element out you begin to introduce a 5 a side sunday league mentality into underage which will ultimately take the edge of some players. My experience is that this competitive nature is what drives most youth players into senior football. I suppose it comes down to what clubs want do the want to provide a sporting outlet in their community for youth or are they in the business of creating success at senior level. My club experience is that the latter is the over arching reasons for clubs having youth teams.

Not ever player is going to play senior but a healthy club is going to be me more than your senior team. Your volunteers all come from this base, not every kid is cut out for it but maybe that's the kid down the line that will be a great coach, great administrator a great volunteer. You should always be prepared to lose matches but you shouldn't be prepared to win matches at the cost of losing players.

I don't believe competitive underage sport drives winning cultures, there is far too much emphasis on the result and not enough on the performance, if you focus on the performance and work on intrinsic motivating factors, you will find your level and become competitive as a result. It takes time and patience and teams need to be prepared to lose, what's better a for a club an u14 Feile Title or a County Minor Title?

14
GAA Discussion / Re: Underage Grades
« on: November 13, 2019, 11:23:35 AM »
If clubs focused more on participation than winning numbers falling away would decrease.

1. County boards should run u13, 14, u15, u16 and 17 leagues championships at the same time. Stop sending kids up age grades. I know talented kids that were playing u15 in Spring, u16 and minor in the summer and then u17 in Autumn/Winter. Madness.
2. For clubs that can't play at each age grade focus on the grades where you have numbers but alway make u17 your priority, for e.g if you have 18 u16s but only 7 u17s, you still play u17s only even though your u16 team are all of age.
3. If you don't have an age grade for a kid, let him transfer one year out, e.g. you have a 13 year old but no u13 or u14 team then let him transfer out for one year to another clubs or u13 or u14 team only
4. Look at introducing u18.5 and u20.5 age grades, this helps capture the kids who were July to December and missed out because of relative age affect.
5. If your club doesn't have a an u20.5 team they can play dual status with another club i.e. play adult with your club and u20.5 only with another club.
6. Finally remove all coaches egos, it's ok to lose, stop prioritising winning over loosing. If you have a panel of 25, all 25 get a least half a game.

We as adults are too quick to impose our values on young players, majority of kids play sport to have fun, to be with friends, to belong.....winning is way down the list. When kids lose games they might show disappointment, but that disappointment is not in the losing but the in the belief that they have let down their coaches and parents.

Finally abandon all development squads from u13 to u15. Very few of these kids go on to make it and a lot just give up when cut.

15
GAA Discussion / Re: Dublin over the next few years
« on: November 13, 2019, 09:26:04 AM »
If anyones up in Dublin, il give you a tour of Innisfails grounds.

PM me.

the sports centre in Adamstown.



Not too much in Adamstown Lar apart from an abandoned train station and a ton of Nigerians!

You're better than that Heffo.

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