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Messages - Il Bomber Destro

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1
General discussion / Re: Teachers get it handy!
« on: Today at 01:15:34 PM »
Ha so says Bomber who was never a teacher!!

The legality of sending a child to school with a recording device, is breaking the law right there,

So only those who have 3/4 months annual leave in the year are entitled to comment on whether it is justified or not?

You'd soon find the real reason people take a career in teaching up if the annual leave entitlements were brought in line with other public sector workers.

Says the person who doesn't understand the idea of 'paid leave' or how teachers are paid.

Teachers are very well paid for their work. Their problem is that their place of employment only opens for 195 days per year.  So, their pay is limited.  They do not have the benefit of being able to work on the 42 days that others in full time employment can avail of.

They are only paid for working 195 days each year plus 28 days paid leave rather than the maximum 237 days ((53x5) - 28) that would be the norm for all other workers in full time employment who also receive 28 days paid leave. 

Up until the 1980s, teachers did not receive payment outside the school year.  Then a government decision was taken that payment should be spread over 12 months and not 10 months to ease and smooth the cash flow in the public sector purse.  This is now the norm for all public sector employees employed for less than 237 days.  So, at that time, teachers accepted a reduction in their monthly salaries because they were still paid for their work but payment was spread over the whole year.

Nowadays, under legislation for all employees, teachers get 28 days of holiday pay like all other public sector employees but this is subsumed into school closures. There was no increase in salary to take account of this change. Only 4 years ago, teachers received this right to the 28 days of paid holiday like every other worker.  A teacher ill for a period that does end before the summer break is entitled like every other worker to take all lost holidays before returning to work but if the period off is followed by the summer break then it is assumed that lost holidays are taken during the summer break.

However, teachers on temporary contracts, where they are paid the daily rate, remain without the right to holiday pay.  They are effectively on a form of zero hours contracts.  They earn the same as their permanent and temporary one year contracted colleagues over the year but are paid more per month, in any month without school closures, because they receive the daily rate = salary/195 rather than having it spread over the whole year.  They are only paid on the days they work and are unemployed outside the 195 days the school is open.

In short, teachers receive no more paid holidays than any other public sector employee, they are just very well paid on the 195 days they work and the statutory 28 days of paid holiday enjoyed by all.

Semantics.

They get paid throughout the year and are off work for 3/4 months of it.

Overpaid and underworked. There's never a shortage of teachers because people get into teaching for the holidays, take the holiday package away and bring it in line with other public sector areas and the amount of people pursuing teaching as a career would drop dramatically.

It then might stop teachers complaining about a lack of hours.

I think you meant underpaid and overworked. If you know nothing about a topic bomber you really shouldn't comment on it. As for people go into teaching for the holidays, wrong again. I never met a teacher who did that. In fact, I know quite a few, including myself, who got out of teaching despite the holidays

No I didn't. I've worked and lived with teachers so I do have my own insights to what they do. You said you never knew a teacher got it in for the holidays. Brilliant, so there should be no objection if teachers were put to working during the school breaks with community based projects.

Teachers live in a bubble. They are overpaid and underworked.

Are you a teacher or married to one?

So you have no first hand experience of teaching do you? Why would they do community based projects? Although I know quite a few who do that kind of work during holidays, running summer camps etc, but why would they? Would you put a doctor onto community based projects during thir time off? A binman? A solicitor? So why a teacher
I will say it again, with first hand experience, unlike you. Teachers are overworked and underpaid

Why would they do community based projects? Because for one quarter of the working year they do nothing. Teachers are like unionists in that they feel a sense of entitlement to perks that others don't have and never will

It's quite simple really. If the very generous holidays that teachers get are not a reason or incentive for people pursuing that career then it shouldn't be a problem scrapping that entitlement and bringing it in line with other, already generous, public sector employment.

Teachers are very defensive about their  3 months holidays. They feel a sense of entitlement to them. Why do they feel they deserve them in contrast with other workers?

2
General discussion / Re: Teachers get it handy!
« on: Today at 11:17:40 AM »
Ha so says Bomber who was never a teacher!!

The legality of sending a child to school with a recording device, is breaking the law right there,

So only those who have 3/4 months annual leave in the year are entitled to comment on whether it is justified or not?

You'd soon find the real reason people take a career in teaching up if the annual leave entitlements were brought in line with other public sector workers.

Says the person who doesn't understand the idea of 'paid leave' or how teachers are paid.

Teachers are very well paid for their work. Their problem is that their place of employment only opens for 195 days per year.  So, their pay is limited.  They do not have the benefit of being able to work on the 42 days that others in full time employment can avail of.

They are only paid for working 195 days each year plus 28 days paid leave rather than the maximum 237 days ((53x5) - 28) that would be the norm for all other workers in full time employment who also receive 28 days paid leave. 

Up until the 1980s, teachers did not receive payment outside the school year.  Then a government decision was taken that payment should be spread over 12 months and not 10 months to ease and smooth the cash flow in the public sector purse.  This is now the norm for all public sector employees employed for less than 237 days.  So, at that time, teachers accepted a reduction in their monthly salaries because they were still paid for their work but payment was spread over the whole year.

Nowadays, under legislation for all employees, teachers get 28 days of holiday pay like all other public sector employees but this is subsumed into school closures. There was no increase in salary to take account of this change. Only 4 years ago, teachers received this right to the 28 days of paid holiday like every other worker.  A teacher ill for a period that does end before the summer break is entitled like every other worker to take all lost holidays before returning to work but if the period off is followed by the summer break then it is assumed that lost holidays are taken during the summer break.

However, teachers on temporary contracts, where they are paid the daily rate, remain without the right to holiday pay.  They are effectively on a form of zero hours contracts.  They earn the same as their permanent and temporary one year contracted colleagues over the year but are paid more per month, in any month without school closures, because they receive the daily rate = salary/195 rather than having it spread over the whole year.  They are only paid on the days they work and are unemployed outside the 195 days the school is open.

In short, teachers receive no more paid holidays than any other public sector employee, they are just very well paid on the 195 days they work and the statutory 28 days of paid holiday enjoyed by all.

Semantics.

They get paid throughout the year and are off work for 3/4 months of it.

Overpaid and underworked. There's never a shortage of teachers because people get into teaching for the holidays, take the holiday package away and bring it in line with other public sector areas and the amount of people pursuing teaching as a career would drop dramatically.

It then might stop teachers complaining about a lack of hours.

I think you meant underpaid and overworked. If you know nothing about a topic bomber you really shouldn't comment on it. As for people go into teaching for the holidays, wrong again. I never met a teacher who did that. In fact, I know quite a few, including myself, who got out of teaching despite the holidays

No I didn't. I've worked and lived with teachers so I do have my own insights to what they do. You said you never knew a teacher got it in for the holidays. Brilliant, so there should be no objection if teachers were put to working during the school breaks with community based projects.

Teachers live in a bubble. They are overpaid and underworked.

Are you a teacher or married to one?

3
General discussion / Re: Teachers get it handy!
« on: Today at 06:40:44 AM »
Ha so says Bomber who was never a teacher!!

The legality of sending a child to school with a recording device, is breaking the law right there,

So only those who have 3/4 months annual leave in the year are entitled to comment on whether it is justified or not?

You'd soon find the real reason people take a career in teaching up if the annual leave entitlements were brought in line with other public sector workers.

Says the person who doesn't understand the idea of 'paid leave' or how teachers are paid.

Teachers are very well paid for their work. Their problem is that their place of employment only opens for 195 days per year.  So, their pay is limited.  They do not have the benefit of being able to work on the 42 days that others in full time employment can avail of.

They are only paid for working 195 days each year plus 28 days paid leave rather than the maximum 237 days ((53x5) - 28) that would be the norm for all other workers in full time employment who also receive 28 days paid leave. 

Up until the 1980s, teachers did not receive payment outside the school year.  Then a government decision was taken that payment should be spread over 12 months and not 10 months to ease and smooth the cash flow in the public sector purse.  This is now the norm for all public sector employees employed for less than 237 days.  So, at that time, teachers accepted a reduction in their monthly salaries because they were still paid for their work but payment was spread over the whole year.

Nowadays, under legislation for all employees, teachers get 28 days of holiday pay like all other public sector employees but this is subsumed into school closures. There was no increase in salary to take account of this change. Only 4 years ago, teachers received this right to the 28 days of paid holiday like every other worker.  A teacher ill for a period that does end before the summer break is entitled like every other worker to take all lost holidays before returning to work but if the period off is followed by the summer break then it is assumed that lost holidays are taken during the summer break.

However, teachers on temporary contracts, where they are paid the daily rate, remain without the right to holiday pay.  They are effectively on a form of zero hours contracts.  They earn the same as their permanent and temporary one year contracted colleagues over the year but are paid more per month, in any month without school closures, because they receive the daily rate = salary/195 rather than having it spread over the whole year.  They are only paid on the days they work and are unemployed outside the 195 days the school is open.

In short, teachers receive no more paid holidays than any other public sector employee, they are just very well paid on the 195 days they work and the statutory 28 days of paid holiday enjoyed by all.

Semantics.

They get paid throughout the year and are off work for 3/4 months of it.

Overpaid and underworked. There's never a shortage of teachers because people get into teaching for the holidays, take the holiday package away and bring it in line with other public sector areas and the amount of people pursuing teaching as a career would drop dramatically.

It then might stop teachers complaining about a lack of hours.

4
The Bomber's unhealthy obsession with Ros has returned.
Go back to your doctor and get some tablets quick.

Unhealthy?

Obsession?

I'm just reporting facts, guy. If they rile you perhaps you should seek the tablets, maybe mind-altering ones.

5
You'd have to expect a severe backlash from the Rossies, last years replay was their biggest embarrassment since the Gay Referendum.

On a different note, complete joke that the provincial losers get to join the qualifiers at R4. They should join at R3 and have the R3 winners facing off in R4

System is stacked enough as it is against provincial final losers. That would be a mental change tbh.

It's a total disgrace that Roscommon could beat Leitrim and get beat by Galway and still are one match away from a QF. Monaghan have to beat Fermanagh, Cavan, Down, lose against Tyrone then win a R4 game to reach the same spot. The Rossies have 'er handy.

Ulster is shite lad. Ye beat the Donegal U21 team and suddenly eejits think ye'll not only give Dublin a game but beat them.

I believe Roscommon have been tossed out by Ulster sides in 4 of the past 5 Championships.


True. But in the last 4 or 5 years, outside province, Roscommon have only been able to knock out Ulster sides - Cavan a few times, and Armagh.

Quote

I believe it's also 16 or 17 years since Roscommon beat either Mayo or Galway in Championship football.

Beat both in 2001, previous to that in 90 and 91. High time we altered that. I believe the current group of players, right now a very young team,  have enough talent to change that.

What is interesting about the batch of Roscommon underage teams that had moderate to decent success over the past 7/8 years is how many of them have turned out to be crocks?

Were they just thrown into senior too early and flogged? They've been hyped up quite a bit over the last few years and I think there has been a very soft core in them, I think they believe a lot of the hype and when things tend to go bad for them, they fold rather than dig in and turn it around. The Clare game being a prime example.

6
Just especially for Syferus I've decided to compile Roscommon's recent Championship record against Galway and Mayo:

2002 - 10 point loss to Galway
2003 - 4 point defeat to Galway
2004 - 10 point defeat to Mayo
2005 - 8 point defeat to Mayo
2006 - 5 point defeat to Galway
2008 - 16 point defeat to Galway
2009 -  20 point defeat to Mayo
2011 - 2 point defeat to Mayo
2012 - 14 point defeat to Galway
2013 - 12 point defeat to Mayo
2014 - 1 point defeat to Mayo
2016 - draw to Galway and 11 point defeat to Galway

That's 13 games without a win and an aggregate scoring deficit of -113. I wouldn't be surprised if Roscommon add to that.

7
You'd have to expect a severe backlash from the Rossies, last years replay was their biggest embarrassment since the Gay Referendum.

On a different note, complete joke that the provincial losers get to join the qualifiers at R4. They should join at R3 and have the R3 winners facing off in R4

System is stacked enough as it is against provincial final losers. That would be a mental change tbh.

It's a total disgrace that Roscommon could beat Leitrim and get beat by Galway and still are one match away from a QF. Monaghan have to beat Fermanagh, Cavan, Down, lose against Tyrone then win a R4 game to reach the same spot. The Rossies have 'er handy.

Ulster is shite lad. Ye beat the Donegal U21 team and suddenly eejits think ye'll not only give Dublin a game but beat them.

I believe Roscommon have been tossed out by Ulster sides in 4 of the past 5 Championships.

I believe it's also 16 or 17 years since Roscommon beat either Mayo or Galway in Championship football.

8
GAA Discussion / Re: Tyrone v Donegal - Sunday 18th June at 2pm
« on: June 21, 2017, 07:21:50 PM »
I would not be surprised if Longford beat Donegal though, Ulster football is not where it used to be.

I would be very surprised if Longford beat Donegal.

They beat a better Monaghan team last year, lightning doesn't always strike twice but don't be shocked if it does.

I would be shocked if Longford beat Donegal.

9
GAA Discussion / Re: Tyrone v Donegal - Sunday 18th June at 2pm
« on: June 21, 2017, 07:10:36 PM »
On Cavanagh, I don't think he gets much of a free pass if he underperforms.

Wasn't his greatest game on Saturday as he took a lot of wrong choices and such but you're not really going to be focusing on the negatives when you put in a performance like Tyrone did on Sunday. He still looks in tremendous shape for a lad who is now 34 and the mistakes he made were very unlike Cavanagh. He's still a very important player for us.

10
GAA Discussion / Re: Tyrone v Donegal - Sunday 18th June at 2pm
« on: June 21, 2017, 07:04:34 PM »
I would not be surprised if Longford beat Donegal though, Ulster football is not where it used to be.

I would be very surprised if Longford beat Donegal.

11
GAA Discussion / Re: Tyrone v Donegal - Sunday 18th June at 2pm
« on: June 20, 2017, 09:28:36 PM »
Fed up hearing all the excuses about this being such a young Donegal team.  Tyrones team is littered with young players, yet before the game it was apparently the youth of Donegal that was going to win.  This was all a result of lazy journalism, reading far too much into a league where teams have done well in previous years due to ramping up their training earlier and simply being further down the road of the other teams in the Spring.

To be fair there were 7 or 8 Donegal players who never started a game of that magnitude and it showed.

I think if there's one criticism that should be pointed at Rory Gallagher, it would be that some of these lads should have been integrated a lot quicker. A run in the qualifiers might do them the world of good.

Why did McGlynn go off Sunday? Injury? He's been a huge player for Donegal over the years but like Lacey he looks like he's at the end of the road.

12
Tyrone / Re: Tyrone County Football and Hurling
« on: June 20, 2017, 03:33:59 PM »
Interesting take on proceedings by Cahair O'Kane.
I'm amazed to read some people saying that Tyrone did nothing different on Sunday but I think they tried several different tactics. Our usual hand passing game wasn't very evident as we kick passed a lot more.

THE hype machine has propelled Tyrone from being a team with no forwards on Sunday morning to All-Ireland champions-in-waiting by sun down.

But as with most things, the truth is somewhere in the middle.

This is a team that was in complete control against Dublin at Croke Park in February until Mark Bradley got sent off in the second half, that beat Monaghan the following week, yet would have needed bullet-proof glass to keep themselves sheltered from the reckless firing at them over the last two months.

The way they ended the National League was all the convincing people needed.

Tyrone have no forwards. They don’t commit to the attack. They’ve learnt nothing from last year.

And even though they scored 0-22 against Derry, it was still a relatively unconvincing performance that did nothing to curtail the critics’ enthusiasm.

It seems obvious now that they were actually toying with the Oak Leafers, so confident that they’d win the game that they saw no need to show their hand.

Yet anyone studying Tyrone’s performances this year would have seen the blueprint that they broke out of the box on Sunday being prepared.

Even the night they were well beaten in Ballybofey in the League was telling. As Tyrone’s players and management fretted over the lack of showers in MacCumhaill Park on a Baltic night, there seemed less angst about having lost the game.

Mickey Harte stood at the side of the away changing room door almost totally non-plussed, smiling even, in his post-match interview.

Sean Cavanagh was happy to talk Donegal up on to the list of contenders for silverware.

While Donegal were psyched for a significant league win, Tyrone were looking at the bigger picture.

Cavanagh was one of several players that had a spell at full-forward that night. Peter Harte, Mattie Donnelly and Niall Sludden were all inside at various times as well.

The style was direct but a poor imitation of what we saw on Sunday.

Conditions were atrocious and so was Tyrone’s supply of ball inside. Everything they kicked in broke down.

But through the torrential rain, they continued to chisel at it.

The precision just wasn’t there. It had been three years since they’d tried to consistently play like that. It was going to take time.

The National League for Tyrone was the breeding ground for everything that came to pass on Sunday. They’d only play that way for a half here and a half there, careful to put all the pieces together away from plain sight.

And on Sunday, it all came together.

The sunshine, the glorious green sward, the lack of any meaningful wind, it all suited the style of play Tyrone brought to Clones.

All that 50-50 ball they'd kicked in Ballybofey had become 70-30 ball. One hop into space kind of ball that a forward like Mark Bradley loves.

It’s a myth that they have been completely immune to the idea of kicking over the last three years.

They set out to kick against Mayo last year but grew frustrated and confused by its failure to work.

Mayo were happy after 15 minutes that Brendan Harrison had the measure of Ronan O’Neill. The green and red shirts were able to defend in a different shape.

Their spare men were able to push out and make tackles on the runners. Kevin McLoughlin, having struggled all summer to cut ball out, didn’t need to any more. He pushed out and made tackles on his own 45 all day.

Tyrone didn’t kick the ball because kicking it wasn’t working. It was coming straight back and allowing Mayo to hammer them on the counter-attack.

Critical to the whole venture on Sunday, and now the rest of the summer, was Mark Bradley. He lost the first two balls but won everything else and pulled Donegal around with his corner-to-corner runs.

They had to protect against him because he was giving Paddy McGrath bother. That Tyrone were prepared to use those runs and feed him the ball in turn opened the space for Mattie Donnelly and Peter Harte and Niall Sludden in particular.

Donegal were the first team to see the full jigsaw and they didn’t know what to do. They ended up neither covering their full-back line nor coming out to meet runners. They did nothing as Tyrone ran in 1-21 and missed five clear goal chances.

They’ve hit a record 1-43 in two games but Sunday was one of those days when absolutely everything Tyrone kicked went over the bar.

No matter were it from the sideline, from the corner flag, from 50 yards, one after the other the shots sailed between Mark Anthony McGinley’s posts.

Monaghan, should they beat Down, will look at it and see a lack of defensive pressure on the shot, and rightly so. You can be sure Darren Hughes and Gavin Doogan won’t be sitting back in the pocket watching Mattie Donnelly and Niall Sludden stroll about picking off scores.

Missing five goal chances removes their performance from the ‘perfect’ bracket and moves into the ‘very, very good’ box.

Does anyone think that if they get through Saturday night, Malachy O’Rourke won’t be sitting lapping up all this hype as he ruggedly prepares one of Ireland’s meanest defences to face a team that’s ruined its All-Ireland dreams twice?

Tyrone would not blitz Monaghan the way they blitzed Donegal. They aren’t going to railroad all in their path to win the All-Ireland. It’s conceivable that they won’t even win Ulster.

If they go out on July 16 and it’s teeming from the heavens and there’s a gale blowing towards Monaghan town, they will have to adapt all over again.

For the first time, they look as though they’ll be able to.

And for that reason, they will be very definitely in the mix for serious silverware.

We kicked the ball because we were allowed kick it, there was plenty of space for Bradley to run into.

13
Tyrone / Re: Tyrone County Football and Hurling
« on: June 20, 2017, 07:12:45 AM »
Morgan's kick outs were fantastic, looks like he'll be the number one now. However, it's great to have such good competition with Mickey waiting in the wings. Like the 00s again with Packie and John.

One thing Morgan is highly underrated on is how commanding he is under the high ball, made 3 or 4 excellent interventions on Sunday when hanging balls dropped into the box.

14
GAA Discussion / Re: Tyrone v Donegal - Sunday 18th June at 2pm
« on: June 18, 2017, 11:43:24 PM »
McGinley pulled off some great scores but it drives me mad when a player shoots high in a one on one position. Cavanagh and Brennan should have slid their attempts along the ground. If we can start burying a higher percentage of our goal chances then I think we really have a genuine chance at an AI.

Cavanagh should have slipped his one to Sludden who had an empty net to pop it into.

15
Tyrone / Re: Tyrone County Football and Hurling
« on: June 18, 2017, 11:19:04 PM »
Tyrone played the same system they always play today - getting 13/14 men behind the ball
And break at pace - that is no different to what they have done over the last two years. There was no change of style. The only difference today was that they scored65% of their shots
They didn't kick the usual 13-15 wides that we usually get!
They have always created a lot of scoring chances despite being labelled as being all out defensive
For example against Dublin in the league this year they created almost double the amount of scoring chances that Dublin did, against Mayo it was a very high total - but in both games they kicked a massive amount of wides/ shorts.
The difference today was no change in tactics or style - they just managed to convert a lot more chances

Yeah, that's fairly true though our kick out strategy was much more adventurous. We went direct which allowed us more space to get into and I think Donegal also allowed us to play unlike they did last year. For me Colm Cavanagh was the main man today, lorded it at midfield and was the platform for our dominance, a great target for Morgan to hit and we fed off him.

Good to see Conall McCann making the most of his opportunity.

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