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Non GAA Discussion => General discussion => Topic started by: BennyCake on May 19, 2020, 02:33:19 PM

Title: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: BennyCake on May 19, 2020, 02:33:19 PM
Slightly different thread to the sniggering placenames.

Always liked the sound of Skibbereen, Dingle, Kinvara,

Dingle and Kinvara I’ve been to, and they’re nice spots. Not got to Skibbereen yet, sounds a lovely spot. Could be wrong though.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: APM on May 19, 2020, 04:14:46 PM
Seskinore and Seskillgreen
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: seafoid on May 19, 2020, 06:02:13 PM
Cluainín
Neidín
Cluain Meala
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: hardstation on May 19, 2020, 06:08:51 PM
Fatima Mansions.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Eamonnca1 on May 19, 2020, 07:21:34 PM
Anything beginning in Skellig
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Aristo 60 on May 19, 2020, 11:04:55 PM
Always liked the sound of Killeshandra
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: sid waddell on May 20, 2020, 12:53:07 AM
Fatima Mansions.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FnvsgWD_pAQ
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Never beat the deeler on May 20, 2020, 01:38:31 AM
Geesala
Ballymacahola
Doohoma
Shanvolahan
Rathnamagh
Aghagower
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: illdecide on May 20, 2020, 10:16:15 AM
Lurgan
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Orior on May 20, 2020, 10:51:07 AM
Quote
Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them

All in County Down:

Ringawaddy (Rinn an Mhadaidh), Barony of Lecale LoweR
Ringbane (An Rinn Bhán), Saul
Ringbane (An Rinn Bhán), Donaghmore
Ringclare (Roinn Chláir), Donaghmore
Ringcreevy (Rinn Chraoibhe)
Ringdufferin, Killyleagh
Ringfad (An Rinn Fhada) , Ardglass
Ringhaddy (Rinn an Chadaigh), Killinchy
Ringmackilroy (Rinn Mhic Giolla Ruaidh), Warrenpoint
Ringneill (Rinn an Aoil), Tullnakill
Ringolish (Rinn an Lis), Donaghmore
Ringreagh (An Rann Riabhach), Lecale Upper


Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: mouview on May 20, 2020, 12:20:55 PM
I like Irish place names that are unusual or quite readily descriptive;

Clonmel, Mountmellick are derived I think from honey, mil
Townland near Barna in Galway, Aillepreachain, which presumably means the cliff of the crow. Also Baile an Sciobol, surely meaning the town of the barn.
Near Claremorris , there is a Garrywadreen, which is musical, and reminds one of Gary Waddock!
Also, outside Balla, there's an area known as Prison (maybe corruption of Prizon?), which doesn't sound like the kind of place you want to visit  :)
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: johnnycool on May 20, 2020, 12:31:04 PM
Speaking of Barna, love the name Cois Fharraige used by the local GAA clubs Barna and Spiddal when the amalgamate for hurling.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Harold Disgracey on May 20, 2020, 02:01:00 PM
Gougane Barra
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Dinny Breen on May 20, 2020, 05:58:57 PM
Suncroft
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: seafoid on May 20, 2020, 06:15:22 PM
Prosperous
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Itchy on May 20, 2020, 09:15:51 PM
Always liked the sound of Killeshandra

Cill na Sean Ratha
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Substandard on May 20, 2020, 11:13:58 PM
Swanlinbar.
Gougane Barra.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Itchy on May 20, 2020, 11:36:16 PM
Fatima Mansions.

Better than Herberton anyway
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Itchy on May 20, 2020, 11:38:52 PM
I think irish towns should be primarily spelt in Irish with English written underneath in small letters. The Irish is the only thing that makes any sense. Amount of people that don't even know the meaning of the place name they are from is cat. Yer man Creedon had a interesting show on it on tv.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Evil Genius on May 21, 2020, 12:30:26 AM
Swanlinbar.
Known locally as "Swad", possibly because the mane Cavan bastards thereabouts imagine one syllable is cheaper than three?

Anyhow, I remember once hearing that Swanlinbar wasn't an Irish name at all, but rather was named for three (English?) people, Messrs. Swann, Lynn and Barr, who had owned/operated a Spa in the village.

On consulting Wiki, it appears that I was close(ish), but the details differ somewhat.
According to Jonathan Swift, writing in 1728:
"There is likewise a famous town, where the worst iron in the kingdom is made, and it is called Swandlingbar: the original of which name I shall explain, lest the antiquaries of future ages might be at a loss to derive it. It was a most witty conceit of four gentlemen, who ruined themselves with this iron project. 'Sw' stands for Swift (Swift's uncle, Godwin Swift, for whose memory he had no special regard, was the instigator of the ironworks and the person named. He lost his fortune due to the mismanagement of the business), 'And' stands for Sanders (Robert Saunders of Dublin), 'Ling' for Darling (Richard Darling of Dublin), and 'Bar' for Barry (Richard Barry). Methinks I see the four loggerheads sitting in consult, like Smectimnius, each gravely contributing a part of his own name, to make up one for their place in the iron-work; and could wish they had been hanged, as well as undone, for their wit."

Meanwhile, wiki notes that:
The earliest name recorded for the village was Sra-na-muck which means "The River-field of the pigs". The current official Irish name An Muileann Iarainn meaning 'Iron Mill' reflects the foundation of an ironworks in the town in 1700.

And Swift's typically humourous, if unsparing, comment was included in an essay of his entitled: "On Barbarous Denominations", which might be better referenced in the "Irish placenames that might make you snigger" thread:
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=JC4CAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA147&lpg=PA147&dq=%22on+barbarous+denominations+in+ireland%22&source=web&ots=2wLJ_Vb7Az&sig=Wkjr3s91-eKvf2L0gzAL3XVu2XE&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22on%20barbarous%20denominations%20in%20ireland%22&f=false (https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=JC4CAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA147&lpg=PA147&dq=%22on+barbarous+denominations+in+ireland%22&source=web&ots=2wLJ_Vb7Az&sig=Wkjr3s91-eKvf2L0gzAL3XVu2XE&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22on%20barbarous%20denominations%20in%20ireland%22&f=false)
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: omochain on May 21, 2020, 05:58:41 AM
Dernoose
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Itchy on May 21, 2020, 01:36:11 PM
Swanlinbar.
Known locally as "Swad", possibly because the mane Cavan bastards thereabouts imagine one syllable is cheaper than three?

Anyhow, I remember once hearing that Swanlinbar wasn't an Irish name at all, but rather was named for three (English?) people, Messrs. Swann, Lynn and Barr, who had owned/operated a Spa in the village.

On consulting Wiki, it appears that I was close(ish), but the details differ somewhat.
According to Jonathan Swift, writing in 1728:
"There is likewise a famous town, where the worst iron in the kingdom is made, and it is called Swandlingbar: the original of which name I shall explain, lest the antiquaries of future ages might be at a loss to derive it. It was a most witty conceit of four gentlemen, who ruined themselves with this iron project. 'Sw' stands for Swift (Swift's uncle, Godwin Swift, for whose memory he had no special regard, was the instigator of the ironworks and the person named. He lost his fortune due to the mismanagement of the business), 'And' stands for Sanders (Robert Saunders of Dublin), 'Ling' for Darling (Richard Darling of Dublin), and 'Bar' for Barry (Richard Barry). Methinks I see the four loggerheads sitting in consult, like Smectimnius, each gravely contributing a part of his own name, to make up one for their place in the iron-work; and could wish they had been hanged, as well as undone, for their wit."

Meanwhile, wiki notes that:
The earliest name recorded for the village was Sra-na-muck which means "The River-field of the pigs". The current official Irish name An Muileann Iarainn meaning 'Iron Mill' reflects the foundation of an ironworks in the town in 1700.

And Swift's typically humourous, if unsparing, comment was included in an essay of his entitled: "On Barbarous Denominations", which might be better referenced in the "Irish placenames that might make you snigger" thread:
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=JC4CAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA147&lpg=PA147&dq=%22on+barbarous+denominations+in+ireland%22&source=web&ots=2wLJ_Vb7Az&sig=Wkjr3s91-eKvf2L0gzAL3XVu2XE&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22on%20barbarous%20denominations%20in%20ireland%22&f=false (https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=JC4CAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA147&lpg=PA147&dq=%22on+barbarous+denominations+in+ireland%22&source=web&ots=2wLJ_Vb7Az&sig=Wkjr3s91-eKvf2L0gzAL3XVu2XE&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22on%20barbarous%20denominations%20in%20ireland%22&f=false)

I didnt know that about Swad, interesting.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Billys Boots on May 21, 2020, 01:38:42 PM
Ringabella (in Cork) ... I'll get my coat.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Substandard on May 21, 2020, 08:50:45 PM
Swanlinbar.
Known locally as "Swad", possibly because the mane Cavan bastards thereabouts imagine one syllable is cheaper than three?

Anyhow, I remember once hearing that Swanlinbar wasn't an Irish name at all, but rather was named for three (English?) people, Messrs. Swann, Lynn and Barr, who had owned/operated a Spa in the village.

On consulting Wiki, it appears that I was close(ish), but the details differ somewhat.
According to Jonathan Swift, writing in 1728:
"There is likewise a famous town, where the worst iron in the kingdom is made, and it is called Swandlingbar: the original of which name I shall explain, lest the antiquaries of future ages might be at a loss to derive it. It was a most witty conceit of four gentlemen, who ruined themselves with this iron project. 'Sw' stands for Swift (Swift's uncle, Godwin Swift, for whose memory he had no special regard, was the instigator of the ironworks and the person named. He lost his fortune due to the mismanagement of the business), 'And' stands for Sanders (Robert Saunders of Dublin), 'Ling' for Darling (Richard Darling of Dublin), and 'Bar' for Barry (Richard Barry). Methinks I see the four loggerheads sitting in consult, like Smectimnius, each gravely contributing a part of his own name, to make up one for their place in the iron-work; and could wish they had been hanged, as well as undone, for their wit."

Meanwhile, wiki notes that:
The earliest name recorded for the village was Sra-na-muck which means "The River-field of the pigs". The current official Irish name An Muileann Iarainn meaning 'Iron Mill' reflects the foundation of an ironworks in the town in 1700.

And Swift's typically humourous, if unsparing, comment was included in an essay of his entitled: "On Barbarous Denominations", which might be better referenced in the "Irish placenames that might make you snigger" thread:
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=JC4CAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA147&lpg=PA147&dq=%22on+barbarous+denominations+in+ireland%22&source=web&ots=2wLJ_Vb7Az&sig=Wkjr3s91-eKvf2L0gzAL3XVu2XE&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22on%20barbarous%20denominations%20in%20ireland%22&f=false (https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=JC4CAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA147&lpg=PA147&dq=%22on+barbarous+denominations+in+ireland%22&source=web&ots=2wLJ_Vb7Az&sig=Wkjr3s91-eKvf2L0gzAL3XVu2XE&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22on%20barbarous%20denominations%20in%20ireland%22&f=false)

I didnt know that about Swad, interesting.

Thank you for that, I didn't think there was an Irish root to it, just a name that always sounded nice.  On a side note, not only are townland names in Irish often beautiful or interesting,  there's so much lore attached to fields and boreens with names attaching people or events, and over time, all that's left is the name, and I'm sure so many of those get lost in time too.
It's a fascinating subject,  if one could make the time to look into it.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Harold Disgracey on May 21, 2020, 10:02:54 PM
Dernoose

With a name like O Mochain, I would guess you’re from round that direction.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: omochain on May 21, 2020, 10:40:51 PM
Yes... ;).. but they chased me away in 1969.. and I have been missing the Stoney Gray Hills ever since.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Fear Bun Na Sceilpe on May 21, 2020, 11:40:21 PM
As the song goes- Gortahork and Glenamaddy
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Orior on May 21, 2020, 11:59:31 PM
Yes... ;).. but they chased me away in 1969.. and I have been missing the Stoney Gray Hills ever since.

I heard that as part of the GFA your exclusion order was lifted. Has nobody told you?
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: omochain on May 22, 2020, 12:36:59 AM
What’s the GFA... ;)
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Eamonnca1 on May 22, 2020, 05:27:13 AM
Keady
Derrynoose
Dungannon
Dungiven
Clontibret
Tyrconnell / Donegal
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Lar Naparka on May 22, 2020, 06:07:57 AM
As the song goes- Gortahork and Glenamaddy
"I have been to many strange places,
To the lands of the Greek and the Turk.
But some folks will bet
I ain't seen nothing yet
'Til I land me in old Gortahork."
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Fear Bun Na Sceilpe on May 22, 2020, 09:29:37 AM
Keady
Derrynoose
Dungannon
Dungiven
Clontibret
Tyrconnell / Donegal

I like Clontibret, mainly coz we beat the Brits there once.
Did you know that Tír Chonaill is Donegal minus Inis Eoghain?
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Fear Bun Na Sceilpe on May 22, 2020, 09:30:29 AM
As the song goes- Gortahork and Glenamaddy
"I have been to many strange places,
To the lands of the Greek and the Turk.
But some folks will bet
I ain't seen nothing yet
'Til I land me in old Gortahork."

What a place, Gaeltacht country too
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: armaghniac on May 22, 2020, 10:28:21 AM
I  always like the sound of Foughill Etra at Jonesborough, there seems to  be some debate over the original name, Eochoill Íochtarach seems likely.
Likewise Annacloghmullin (Áth na gCloch Muillinn) over between Lislea and Belleeks.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: rosnarun on May 22, 2020, 11:30:35 AM
Prosperous
secret to a happy marriage a clane woman and a Prosperous man.
most commonly used irish place names are bastardized version of the real name and sometime not even referring to the same place most notable example being Balie atha cliath (ford of the hurdles)  which refers to the liffey crossing near wood Quay and Dublin(black pool) which apparently refers to tar pit in what is now Dublin Zoo
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Harold Disgracey on May 22, 2020, 11:37:21 AM
Townlands of my grandparents.

Derryneskin (Doire Naoscán - Oakwood of the snipes)
Derrinraw (Doire an Rátha - Oakwood of the Rath)
Dernasell West (Doire na Saille Thair - Oakwood of the salted meat)
Cushenny (Cúil Sionnaigh - Corner of the fox)
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: armaghniac on May 22, 2020, 12:09:24 PM
Prosperous
secret to a happy marriage a clane woman and a Prosperous man.
most commonly used irish place names are bastardized version of the real name and sometime not even referring to the same place most notable example being Balie atha cliath (ford of the hurdles)  which refers to the liffey crossing near wood Quay and Dublin(black pool) which apparently refers to tar pit in what is now Dublin Zoo

The English can be derived from the Irish of a neighbouring place, where a town (like Dublin) includes multiple townlands.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Fear Bun Na Sceilpe on May 22, 2020, 12:46:00 PM
Townlands of my grandparents.

Derryneskin (Doire Naoscán - Oakwood of the snipes)
Derrinraw (Doire an Rátha - Oakwood of the Rath)
Dernasell West (Doire na Saille Thair - Oakwood of the salted meat)
Cushenny (Cúil Sionnaigh - Corner of the fox)

Fantastic.

Mines would be 

Edenballymore x2( Eadán An Bhealaigh Mhór- Brow Of the Main Road. Bogside is in this townland and it is not Eadán An Bhaile Mhór as most people claim)
Coshquin(Cois Caoine-Next to the pleasent water)
Creggan(An Cregáin- Stony Place).

All Derry City townlands. Creggan which I mention above isnt actually where the present estate is, it is where Glenowen is today. The creggan estate is made up of Glassagh , Ballymagowan and Edenballymore.

Derry city on the westbank  was part of Inishowen long before modern borders.

Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Rossfan on May 22, 2020, 01:15:22 PM
Prosperous
secret to a happy marriage a clane woman and a Prosperous man.
most commonly used irish place names are bastardized version of the real name and sometime not even referring to the same place most notable example being Balie atha cliath (ford of the hurdles)  which refers to the liffey crossing near wood Quay and Dublin(black pool) which apparently refers to tar pit in what is now Dublin Zoo
The original/proper name for what's now Prosperous is Corr Choill.
Some Quaker chap decided to set up a model town with flax/linen as its base industry and optimistically called it Prosperous.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: seafoid on May 22, 2020, 02:14:53 PM
Cluain Tuaisceart is in the hinterland of Ballinasloe. It is called Clontuskert in English but most people pronounce the Tuaisceart.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Rossfan on May 22, 2020, 03:44:07 PM
There's "Taverane" and "Dooballa" across the frontier in Sligo but the natives still call them Teamhrán (chow rawn) and Dubh Baile (The Bolla).
We still stick with saying Céideadh instead of "Keadue"
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: omochain on May 22, 2020, 08:25:04 PM
Keady
Derrynoose
Dungannon
Dungiven
Clontibret
Tyrconnell / Donegal

I like Clontibret, mainly coz we beat the Brits there once.
Did you know that Tír Chonaill is Donegal minus Inis Eoghain?

And it was the Dernoose men who did most of the fighting and strategic thinking at Clontibret. As “Yellah Mickey” once told me and I quote “There are Two ounces of wit in the world and one and a half is in Drumnahavil. For those of you who aren’t Harold D that’s the epicenter of Dernoose.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Rudi on May 22, 2020, 09:26:15 PM
Shelmalier / Boolavogue _ the boys of Wexford
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Eamonnca1 on May 22, 2020, 09:32:48 PM
Keady
Derrynoose
Dungannon
Dungiven
Clontibret
Tyrconnell / Donegal

I like Clontibret, mainly coz we beat the Brits there once.
Did you know that Tír Chonaill is Donegal minus Inis Eoghain?

Hmm, I never knew that, I always thought they meant the same thing.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Fear Bun Na Sceilpe on May 22, 2020, 10:08:25 PM
Keady
Derrynoose
Dungannon
Dungiven
Clontibret
Tyrconnell / Donegal

I like Clontibret, mainly coz we beat the Brits there once.
Did you know that Tír Chonaill is Donegal minus Inis Eoghain?

Hmm, I never knew that, I always thought they meant the same thing.

They do now mean same thing in modern times, but originally Tír Chonaill and Inish Eoghain were 2 separate entities.

Conall and Eoghan were sons of Niall Naigoillach, Niall of the Nine hostages.
They gave rise to Cineál Eoghain and Cineál Chonaill. O'Neills were Cineál Eoghain, O Donnells Cineál Chonaill. Eoghain gave his name to Tír Eoghain too.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Harold Disgracey on May 22, 2020, 10:18:01 PM
Keady
Derrynoose
Dungannon
Dungiven
Clontibret
Tyrconnell / Donegal

I like Clontibret, mainly coz we beat the Brits there once.
Did you know that Tír Chonaill is Donegal minus Inis Eoghain?

And it was the Dernoose men who did most of the fighting and strategic thinking at Clontibret. As “Yellah Mickey” once told me and I quote “There are Two ounces of wit in the world and one and a half is in Drumnahavil. For those of you who aren’t Harold D that’s the epicenter of Dernoose.

“Yellah Mickey” is correct.

 Tis a bit blowy in Drumnahavil this evening. 
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: thebuzz on May 22, 2020, 11:55:17 PM
Shelmalier / Boolavogue _ the boys of Wexford

Always thought Boolavogue and Enniscorthy were class names.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Farrandeelin on May 23, 2020, 11:10:01 AM
Townlands of my grandparents.

Derryneskin (Doire Naoscán - Oakwood of the snipes)
Derrinraw (Doire an Rátha - Oakwood of the Rath)
Dernasell West (Doire na Saille Thair - Oakwood of the salted meat)
Cushenny (Cúil Sionnaigh - Corner of the fox)

Fantastic.

Mines would be 

Edenballymore x2( Eadán An Bhealaigh Mhór- Brow Of the Main Road. Bogside is in this townland and it is not Eadán An Bhaile Mhór as most people claim)
Coshquin(Cois Caoine-Next to the pleasent water)
Creggan(An Cregáin- Stony Place).

All Derry City townlands. Creggan which I mention above isnt actually where the present estate is, it is where Glenowen is today. The creggan estate is made up of Glassagh , Ballymagowan and Edenballymore.

Derry city on the westbank  was part of Inishowen long before modern borders.



+1 to the fantastic comment.

Mine would be:
Farrandeelin (Fearann Díleann - townland of the floods)
Knockmore (Cnoc Mór - big hill)
Lisaniska (Lios an Uisce - fort of the water)
Rinmore (Rinn Mór - the big promontory)

PS, why did towns change* their Irish names?
Nás na Ríogh has a nicer ring to it than An Nás, likewise Gort Inse Ghluaire instead of An Gort.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: hardstation on May 23, 2020, 11:23:53 AM
Don’t start me on that. Armagh twats.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: omochain on May 23, 2020, 05:23:21 PM
Keady
Derrynoose
Dungannon
Dungiven
Clontibret
Tyrconnell / Donegal

I like Clontibret, mainly coz we beat the Brits there once.
Did you know that Tír Chonaill is Donegal minus Inis Eoghain?

And it was the Dernoose men who did most of the fighting and strategic thinking at Clontibret. As “Yellah Mickey” once told me and I quote “There are Two ounces of wit in the world and one and a half is in Drumnahavil. For those of you who aren’t Harold D that’s the epicenter of Dernoose.

“Yellah Mickey” is correct.

 Tis a bit blowy in Drumnahavil this evening.
You should take shelter in Tossie’s😜
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: seafoid on May 24, 2020, 06:56:40 AM
Townlands of my grandparents.

Derryneskin (Doire Naoscán - Oakwood of the snipes)
Derrinraw (Doire an Rátha - Oakwood of the Rath)
Dernasell West (Doire na Saille Thair - Oakwood of the salted meat)
Cushenny (Cúil Sionnaigh - Corner of the fox)

Fantastic.

Mines would be 

Edenballymore x2( Eadán An Bhealaigh Mhór- Brow Of the Main Road. Bogside is in this townland and it is not Eadán An Bhaile Mhór as most people claim)
Coshquin(Cois Caoine-Next to the pleasent water)
Creggan(An Cregáin- Stony Place).

All Derry City townlands. Creggan which I mention above isnt actually where the present estate is, it is where Glenowen is today. The creggan estate is made up of Glassagh , Ballymagowan and Edenballymore.

Derry city on the westbank  was part of Inishowen long before modern borders.



+1 to the fantastic comment.

Mine would be:
Farrandeelin (Fearann Díleann - townland of the floods)
Knockmore (Cnoc Mór - big hill)
Lisaniska (Lios an Uisce - fort of the water)
Rinmore (Rinn Mór - the big promontory)

PS, why did towns change* their Irish names?
Nás na Ríogh has a nicer ring to it than An Nás, likewise Gort Inse Ghluaire instead of An Gort.
The Guaire in Gort Inse Guaire is also remembered in Dún Guaire in Cinn Mhara/Kinvara
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Itchy on May 24, 2020, 01:22:09 PM
Townlands of my grandparents.

Derryneskin (Doire Naoscán - Oakwood of the snipes)
Derrinraw (Doire an Rátha - Oakwood of the Rath)
Dernasell West (Doire na Saille Thair - Oakwood of the salted meat)
Cushenny (Cúil Sionnaigh - Corner of the fox)

Fantastic.

Mines would be 

Edenballymore x2( Eadán An Bhealaigh Mhór- Brow Of the Main Road. Bogside is in this townland and it is not Eadán An Bhaile Mhór as most people claim)
Coshquin(Cois Caoine-Next to the pleasent water)
Creggan(An Cregáin- Stony Place).

All Derry City townlands. Creggan which I mention above isnt actually where the present estate is, it is where Glenowen is today. The creggan estate is made up of Glassagh , Ballymagowan and Edenballymore.

Derry city on the westbank  was part of Inishowen long before modern borders.



+1 to the fantastic comment.

Mine would be:
Farrandeelin (Fearann Díleann - townland of the floods)
Knockmore (Cnoc Mór - big hill)
Lisaniska (Lios an Uisce - fort of the water)
Rinmore (Rinn Mór - the big promontory)

PS, why did towns change* their Irish names?
Nás na Ríogh has a nicer ring to it than An Nás, likewise Gort Inse Ghluaire instead of An Gort.

They didnt change them, the british sent a guy around surveying the place names of Ireland. It was a good piece of work too as he recorded both the Irish name but also an anglicised name for the town. Over time as the mother tongue was lost the anglicised name came to the forefront. The real question is why did governments from 1922 to today not revert back. As I said earlier, I would rather see all our town names in Irish in big writing with the english version underneath in smaller writing. That would do more to promote the language than most efforts in my lifetime.

Anyway, for those interested watch this show which i thought was very interesting..

https://www.rte.ie/player/series/creedon-s-atlas-of-ireland/SI0000005960?epguid=IH000379664

Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: BennyCake on May 24, 2020, 02:03:46 PM
Townlands of my grandparents.

Derryneskin (Doire Naoscán - Oakwood of the snipes)
Derrinraw (Doire an Rátha - Oakwood of the Rath)
Dernasell West (Doire na Saille Thair - Oakwood of the salted meat)
Cushenny (Cúil Sionnaigh - Corner of the fox)

Fantastic.

Mines would be 

Edenballymore x2( Eadán An Bhealaigh Mhór- Brow Of the Main Road. Bogside is in this townland and it is not Eadán An Bhaile Mhór as most people claim)
Coshquin(Cois Caoine-Next to the pleasent water)
Creggan(An Cregáin- Stony Place).

All Derry City townlands. Creggan which I mention above isnt actually where the present estate is, it is where Glenowen is today. The creggan estate is made up of Glassagh , Ballymagowan and Edenballymore.

Derry city on the westbank  was part of Inishowen long before modern borders.



+1 to the fantastic comment.

Mine would be:
Farrandeelin (Fearann Díleann - townland of the floods)
Knockmore (Cnoc Mór - big hill)
Lisaniska (Lios an Uisce - fort of the water)
Rinmore (Rinn Mór - the big promontory)

PS, why did towns change* their Irish names?
Nás na Ríogh has a nicer ring to it than An Nás, likewise Gort Inse Ghluaire instead of An Gort.

They didnt change them, the british sent a guy around surveying the place names of Ireland. It was a good piece of work too as he recorded both the Irish name but also an anglicised name for the town. Over time as the mother tongue was lost the anglicised name came to the forefront. The real question is why did governments from 1922 to today not revert back. As I said earlier, I would rather see all our town names in Irish in big writing with the english version underneath in smaller writing. That would do more to promote the language than most efforts in my lifetime.

Anyway, for those interested watch this show which i thought was very interesting..

https://www.rte.ie/player/series/creedon-s-atlas-of-ireland/SI0000005960?epguid=IH000379664

Yeah I agree.

Another thing I can’t understand is the amount of streets in Dublin in particular, that are still named after English dukes, princes or politicians. What the feck is that all about?!

The same with Nelson standing for nearly 50 years in the capitals Main Street. It should have been wired it with explosives, as the Brits were leaving to catch the boat.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: weareros on May 24, 2020, 03:27:03 PM
Great thread and for anyone interested in a deeper dive PW Joyce wrote a great collection of books in late 1800s on the origins and meaning of Irish placenames, which carry so much history. In my own parish always enjoyed the sound of “Attiantaggart” which means the site of the priests house. Also enjoy those that carry a scary supernatural element, such as Dromahair - ridge of the two demons, Annascaul - river of the shadow, Loughandoul - lake of the devil.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Evil Genius on May 24, 2020, 06:06:59 PM
Another thing I can’t understand is the amount of streets in Dublin in particular, that are still named after English dukes, princes or politicians. What the feck is that all about?!

The same with Nelson standing for nearly 50 years in the capitals Main Street. It should have been wired it with explosives, as the Brits were leaving to catch the boat.
Quite right!

Let's eliminate every English name about the place.

Then eliminate their language entirely, make everyone speak Irish.

"Tá an stair marbh, déanaimis dul ar ais chuig Year Zero!"

[Alternatively, we could just go back to discussing the myriad Irish names which have a nice ring to them]
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: BennyCake on May 24, 2020, 06:56:12 PM
Another thing I can’t understand is the amount of streets in Dublin in particular, that are still named after English dukes, princes or politicians. What the feck is that all about?!

The same with Nelson standing for nearly 50 years in the capitals Main Street. It should have been wired it with explosives, as the Brits were leaving to catch the boat.
Quite right!

Let's eliminate every English name about the place.

Then eliminate their language entirely, make everyone speak Irish.

"Tá an stair marbh, déanaimis dul ar ais chuig Year Zero!"

[Alternatively, we could just go back to discussing the myriad Irish names which have a nice ring to them]

I didn’t say to eliminate the English language. It’s just strange that you would continue to retain names adapted by the oppressor of hundreds of years. Places named after English Earls, Dukes, Queens, Lords etc. It’s like some sort of street naming Stockholm Syndrome.

Anyway...

(Yes, let’s) ;)
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: From the Bunker on May 24, 2020, 07:21:05 PM
Another thing I can’t understand is the amount of streets in Dublin in particular, that are still named after English dukes, princes or politicians. What the feck is that all about?!

The same with Nelson standing for nearly 50 years in the capitals Main Street. It should have been wired it with explosives, as the Brits were leaving to catch the boat.
Quite right!

Let's eliminate every English name about the place.

Then eliminate their language entirely, make everyone speak Irish.

"Tá an stair marbh, déanaimis dul ar ais chuig Year Zero!"

[Alternatively, we could just go back to discussing the myriad Irish names which have a nice ring to them]

I didn’t say to eliminate the English language. It’s just strange that you would continue to retain names adapted by the oppressor of hundreds of years. Places named after English Earls, Dukes, Queens, Lords etc. It’s like some sort of street naming Stockholm Syndrome.

Anyway...

(Yes, let’s) ;)

We have a myriad of streets in Castlebar named by our previous lawmakers. Ellison St, Spenser St, Charles St, Duke St, Lucan st etc The thing is these streets have been called this for 150 years now. People who live there and have lived there would have an affection to the name (but would think little of it's origins). You could not change the name even if you wanted. There would be uproar! The original reason for naming these streets means nothing to these people. It's part of our history of who we were and now who we are. I'd have more of a gripe with Developers that put silly unconnected names on housing estates. Often calling them after Daughter and the like.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: armaghniac on May 24, 2020, 07:52:37 PM
Exactly. We have this wonderful heritage of place-names, yet developers can call estates what they like, Tuscany downs my arse.
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Rudi on May 24, 2020, 08:00:42 PM
Rosenallis Co Laois
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: Orior on May 24, 2020, 10:05:31 PM
Exactly. We have this wonderful heritage of place-names, yet developers can call estates what they like, Tuscany downs my arse.

Or Abington Manor, off the Crumlin Road in Belfast :-(
Title: Re: Ireland placenames that have a nice ring to them
Post by: The Boy Wonder on May 24, 2020, 10:22:28 PM
Rosenallis Co Laois

Rosenallis sounds even better in Irish - Ros Fhionnghlaise (wood of the clear stream).
A lovely little village in the foothills of the Sliabh Bloom mountains.