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Non GAA Discussion => General discussion => Topic started by: 118cmal on June 25, 2010, 02:59:56 PM

Title: Gardening
Post by: 118cmal on June 25, 2010, 02:59:56 PM
I have just moved into a new house in Belfast and at the front of the property there is a small (roughly 15ft x 15ft) patch of pebbles which I would like to turn into grass.  There is a concrete base underneath these pebbles.

I have never undertaken any type of gardening before so would it be a big job for me?

Also, roughly how much would it cost me to do this?

Thank you in advance,

Mal
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: the Deel Rover on June 25, 2010, 03:25:30 PM
your letting bob down 118cmal he wouldn't have been looking for advice on how to grow grass i'd say   ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: the Deel Rover on June 25, 2010, 03:34:25 PM
What you would need is a about 5-6 inches of topsoil around the 15*15 area which would probably mean you kangoing (spl) out the concrete base and replacing this with the soil.   i suppose getting it turfed would be another option
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: delboy on June 25, 2010, 03:40:49 PM
You could do it yourself no probs, kango (you can hire these i think if you haven't got access to one), it out, put a couple of tonne of top soil down and then lay some turf, the turf ain't that expensive and it'll leave it looking good from the outset rather than faffing about with seed.

The top soil and turf shouldn't be that dear, but don't forget the expense of getting rid of the concrete (might need a skip).
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: the Deel Rover on June 25, 2010, 03:46:33 PM
yeah you will need a skip i'd say, either that or throw it into your neigbours drive ( a nice way of meeting your new neighbour) . Personally i wouldn't bother with the turf just level the top soil rake it and throw on the seed you won't need a lot to cover the area . As far as i recall april and september are the best times for sowing grass seed however there has been feck all growth this year with the dry spell , couuld do with a few weeks of rain fairly soon  ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Real Laoislad on June 25, 2010, 03:52:51 PM
I just done my whole back garden,it had a load of pebbles and railway sleepers through the middle of it so I ripped it all up,moved back some of the flower beds and put grass down in the middle,the grass area is about 12ftx20ft

In all I used 4 ton of topsoil,I got the screened soil,so there wasn't that many stones in it just a few pebbles.It was back breaking enough having to bring the soil from the front of the house to the back but I got the 4 ton in,raked and rolled in a day.
I too wouldn't bother with the turf,if you throw a few seeds down it will grow in no time in this weather,the mixture of heat and a bit of rain and you should see signs of grass within a week I reckon
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: delboy on June 25, 2010, 04:04:23 PM
About £50 would turf it, it a bit more than a box of grass seed, but the advantages are you'll have a nice neat lawn to look at and use immediately, where as growing your own requires you to treat the lawn with kid gloves for quite a while. Also  IMO unless you buy really good grass seed the quality of the grass in the turf will be much better, anyway food for thought.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: the Deel Rover on June 25, 2010, 04:09:10 PM
I just done my whole back garden,it had a load of pebbles and railway sleepers through the middle of it so I ripped it all up,moved back some of the flower beds and put grass down in the middle,the grass area is about 12ftx20ft

In all I used 4 ton of topsoil,I got the screened soil,so there wasn't that many stones in it just a few pebbles.It was back breaking enough ng to bring the soil from the front of the house to the back but I got the 4 ton in,raked and rolled in a day.I too wouldn't bother with the turf,if you throw a few seeds down it will grow in no time in this weather,the mixture of heat and a bit of rain and you should see signs of grass within a week I reckon

and i thought ye laois boys were hardy ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Real Laoislad on June 25, 2010, 04:12:01 PM
About £50 would turf it, it a bit more than a box of grass seed, but the advantages are you'll have a nice neat lawn to look at immediately and IMO unless you buy really good grass seed the quality of the grass in the turf will be much better, anyway food for thought.

I had problems in my front garden before with the turf bedding to the soil underneath,the roots from the turf never took to the soil.
I done all the right things like water it and feed it but it just never took,plus it has the sun all day at the front of the house.
I had to rip it up after a year as it had gone all brown and ended up sowing seed.

Just my experience with turf,I'm sure it will work for some.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Real Laoislad on June 25, 2010, 04:13:08 PM
I just done my whole back garden,it had a load of pebbles and railway sleepers through the middle of it so I ripped it all up,moved back some of the flower beds and put grass down in the middle,the grass area is about 12ftx20ft

In all I used 4 ton of topsoil,I got the screened soil,so there wasn't that many stones in it just a few pebbles.It was back breaking enough ng to bring the soil from the front of the house to the back but I got the 4 ton in,raked and rolled in a day.I too wouldn't bother with the turf,if you throw a few seeds down it will grow in no time in this weather,the mixture of heat and a bit of rain and you should see signs of grass within a week I reckon


and i thought ye laois boys were hardy ;)

Living in Dublin for past 8 years has made me soft  ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: delboy on June 25, 2010, 04:16:18 PM
About £50 would turf it, it a bit more than a box of grass seed, but the advantages are you'll have a nice neat lawn to look at immediately and IMO unless you buy really good grass seed the quality of the grass in the turf will be much better, anyway food for thought.

I had problems in my front garden before with the turf bedding to the soil underneath,the roots from the turf never took to the soil.
I done all the right things like water it and feed it but it just never took,plus it has the sun all day at the front of the house.
I had to rip it up after a year as it had gone all brown and ended up sowing seed.

Just my experience with turf,I'm sure it will work for some.

That would be dissapointing, how did you prep the soil below?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Real Laoislad on June 25, 2010, 04:21:06 PM
About £50 would turf it, it a bit more than a box of grass seed, but the advantages are you'll have a nice neat lawn to look at immediately and IMO unless you buy really good grass seed the quality of the grass in the turf will be much better, anyway food for thought.

I had problems in my front garden before with the turf bedding to the soil underneath,the roots from the turf never took to the soil.
I done all the right things like water it and feed it but it just never took,plus it has the sun all day at the front of the house.
I had to rip it up after a year as it had gone all brown and ended up sowing seed.

Just my experience with turf,I'm sure it will work for some.

That would be dissapointing, how did you prep the soil below?

Just done the usual,I hired a aerator and done all that business,rolled and raked it etc,same as I did for sowing the seed and the seed had no bother growing and as it is I can't keep the bloody thing cut the rate its growing.

I got the turf in Summerhill lawns in Meath,so maybe the Meath grass wasn't happy living in Dublin  :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: delboy on June 25, 2010, 04:29:44 PM
About £50 would turf it, it a bit more than a box of grass seed, but the advantages are you'll have a nice neat lawn to look at immediately and IMO unless you buy really good grass seed the quality of the grass in the turf will be much better, anyway food for thought.

I had problems in my front garden before with the turf bedding to the soil underneath,the roots from the turf never took to the soil.
I done all the right things like water it and feed it but it just never took,plus it has the sun all day at the front of the house.
I had to rip it up after a year as it had gone all brown and ended up sowing seed.

Just my experience with turf,I'm sure it will work for some.

That would be dissapointing, how did you prep the soil below?

Just done the usual,I hired a aerator and done all that business,rolled and raked it etc,same as I did for sowing the seed and the seed had no bother growing and as it is I can't keep the bloody thing cut the rate its growing.

I got the turf in Summerhill lawns in Meath,so maybe the Meath grass wasn't happy living in Dublin  :D

Seems like you certainly did everything right, all right i say go with the grass seed as well then  :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: the Deel Rover on June 25, 2010, 04:33:04 PM
I just done my whole back garden,it had a load of pebbles and railway sleepers through the middle of it so I ripped it all up,moved back some of the flower beds and put grass down in the middle,the grass area is about 12ftx20ft

In all I used 4 ton of topsoil,I got the screened soil,so there wasn't that many stones in it just a few pebbles.It was back breaking enough ng to bring the soil from the front of the house to the back but I got the 4 ton in,raked and rolled in a day.I too wouldn't bother with the turf,if you throw a few seeds down it will grow in no time in this weather,the mixture of heat and a bit of rain and you should see signs of grass within a week I reckon


and i thought ye laois boys were hardy ;)

Living in Dublin for past 8 years has made me soft  ;)

it has for sure LL  :D if your not carefull you will soon pick up the accent 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Aerlik on June 25, 2010, 04:44:02 PM
Splash a bit of chicken slurry on it and not only will you impress your new neighbours with your environmental concerns, but you will also have a nice display of dandelions and dockins in no time.  sure if the local wanes get stung by nettles, they can always come over and use the dockin stalks to help kill the pain. ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: no mo do yakamo on June 25, 2010, 07:31:50 PM
Consider a synthetic grass alternative here. Not  overly expensive and far less prep work in your situation. Maintenance free and will probably work out cheaper for you than a  good quality lawnmower.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Bud Wiser on June 27, 2010, 03:33:46 PM
...and before you get cracking, or in this case, bursting, with the kango hammer make sure your water mains, telephone line and electricity mains are not in your line of fire, particularly around the front door, window area where cables for phone and electrics may be.


Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Niall Quinn on July 26, 2010, 01:04:18 AM
Grasscycling http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grasscycling?wasRedirected=true (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grasscycling?wasRedirected=true)
pros:
completely passive green act for today's lazy man
reduction in landfill demand
reduction in energy relating to waste transportation
natural nitrogen-izing of your lawn
something to do with worms and aeration
cons:
have to find other ways to occupy children

any clipping removers add any further cons?

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: lynchbhoy on July 26, 2010, 10:37:58 AM
mix some sand into the soil for drainage
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: ONeill on August 25, 2010, 09:34:40 PM
Does the Rowan tree need a partner in order to bear fruit (berries)?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Orior on August 25, 2010, 10:30:46 PM
Does the Rowan tree need a partner in order to bear fruit (berries)?

Great question.

*studies the environment for evidence of a fishing line*

Surely all it needs is a few bees?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: spuds on August 25, 2010, 10:33:51 PM
Does the Rowan tree need a partner in order to bear fruit (berries)?

It is self-fertile
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Orior on August 25, 2010, 10:36:40 PM
Good news story.

Earlier in the year, my garden was shit. There were more brown bits that green bits, and the green bits was moss.

I got some prices for those roll-out prebuilt lawns, but then thought feck it, I'd rather keep my money.

I threw my flymo in the bin, and got a mower with wheels, and put it on the highest setting. I threw down some grass seed, which didnt really work. When I was weeding the flower beds, I transplanted little tufts of grass onto the brown bits.

Hey presto! Four months later, I've a beuatiful lush green garden which my neighbour thought that I'd bought pre-bulit.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: ONeill on August 25, 2010, 10:49:34 PM
Does the Rowan tree need a partner in order to bear fruit (berries)?

It is self-fertile

I planted one in Glengormley 8 years ago (a slip) and no luck after 4 years. Just planted one in Glenavy. Are they slow growers?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Rois on August 25, 2010, 11:04:12 PM
Good news story.

Earlier in the year, my garden was shit. There were more brown bits that green bits, and the green bits was moss.


Exactly what has happened with my garden.  Remedying it on Monday by laying down 170 nice red square tiles. 

Anyone need a flymo and a strimmer?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: ONeill on August 25, 2010, 11:13:11 PM
What size is your strimmer?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: spuds on August 25, 2010, 11:54:07 PM
Good news story.

Earlier in the year, my garden was shit. There were more brown bits that green bits, and the green bits was moss.


Exactly what has happened with my garden.  Remedying it on Monday by laying down 170 nice red square tiles

Anyone need a flymo and a strimmer?
Sounds appalling
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: spuds on August 25, 2010, 11:57:22 PM
Does the Rowan tree need a partner in order to bear fruit (berries)?

It is self-fertile

I planted one in Glengormley 2 years ago (a slip) and no luck after 4 years. Just planted one in Glenavy. Are they slow growers?
They are quite adaptable trees normally having a preference for good draining acidic/peaty soil but should grow well in most soils. How tall were these when planted ?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: ONeill on August 25, 2010, 11:58:53 PM
First one about 5 feet. This current one 3 ft.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: spuds on August 26, 2010, 12:22:09 AM
First one about 5 feet. This current one 3 ft.
Most trees don't flower/fruit until they are at a certain maturity that such activity will not stress them. These rowans are relatively fast growing but may still take years to flower.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Gaffer on September 28, 2014, 09:46:12 AM
Anyone ever create raised beds for growing vegetables?

Thinking of doing this but do you just fill the beds with soil or do you have to add anything to it?

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: God14 on September 28, 2014, 11:46:02 AM
Strange time of year Gaffer? I'd have thought start that in March
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Denn Forever on September 28, 2014, 11:57:51 AM
I assume you have to raise the beds and condition the soil first before you start growing?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Tony Baloney on September 28, 2014, 12:04:00 PM
www.rhs.org.uk is a great resource for all questions.
Depends on size of raised beds. If really deep you can fill with scrap like rubble etc. as long as the top couple of feet are soil.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Gaffer on September 28, 2014, 01:55:31 PM
Great website thanks.
Have just ploughed and rotavated a piece of ground.
Was wondering was  there anything I can do this time of year regarding preparing raised beds for next year or indeed could I plant some vegetables at this time.

I know that this is the time of the year for planting fruit trees and I ll be doing that but would also like to be planting vegetables as well and was wondering how to go about preparing a raised bed.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Boycey on July 03, 2018, 08:01:07 PM
Such is my prowess at this kind of stuff I'm not sure if this comes under gardening or DIY...

I put some brick pavers down 4/5 years back, this year weeds and moss have started to show plus they could do with a clean. Mr Google has provided mostly contradictory answers. Do Powerhose/ or definitely don't powerhose, bleach, washing powder, specially made up solutions..

Any tips.. ta
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Aristo 60 on July 03, 2018, 10:21:26 PM
Powerhosing not a good thing in my book esp if pavers are just held with sand. Did it once years ago and never again.

Nowadays I just put down diluted hypochlorite 3:1 (deosan red label). Apply in the dry and rinse off a half day later for best results. I just use a watering can with reduced flow spout and I cover some size of an area at not that great an expense. I get a drum for around £18. If you were to cover the same area with weedol or an equivalent it would be £100ís

Use gloves and welly boots and clothes you can handle a stain on as this stuff strips the die outta clothes quickly. Other than that, keep the kids clear and donít mind the smell that will linger for a few days like a swimming pool ...
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: ONeill on July 03, 2018, 10:25:03 PM
Is urine any good for plants and grass?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Aristo 60 on July 03, 2018, 10:26:06 PM
Only if your hose is long enough.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Targetman on July 03, 2018, 11:26:44 PM
Keep your hose in till the heatwaveís over!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: armaghniac on July 04, 2018, 07:50:45 AM
Keep your hose in till the heatwaveís over!!

How do you know O'Neill has a hose?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Targetman on July 04, 2018, 10:47:58 AM
I donít, could be a sprinkler!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: tintin25 on August 28, 2018, 12:26:06 PM
Anyone have recommendations for a decent/affordable gardener who would cut grass, roll and re-seed a lawn?

Lisburn/Belfast area
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: playwiththewind1st on August 28, 2018, 12:43:26 PM
Such is my prowess at this kind of stuff I'm not sure if this comes under gardening or DIY...

I put some brick pavers down 4/5 years back, this year weeds and moss have started to show plus they could do with a clean. Mr Google has provided mostly contradictory answers. Do Powerhose/ or definitely don't powerhose, bleach, washing powder, specially made up solutions..

Any tips.. ta

I got a 25 litre container of sodium hypochlorite from a builder's yard, fourteen quid. Try that.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Orior on August 28, 2018, 01:20:26 PM
Anyone have recommendations for a decent/affordable gardener who would cut grass, roll and re-seed a lawn?

Lisburn/Belfast area

If you can afford all that then you can afford just to buy a new lawn and have it laid.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BennyCake on April 13, 2019, 01:31:07 PM
Iím after a petrol rotovator, hoping to plant a few vegetables.

Anyone recommend where to buy, what brand, likely cost etc?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jim Bob on April 13, 2019, 02:56:00 PM
Mantis tiller 4 stroke. Has a  Honda engine. Great job. Even hardened ground turned to fine soil. Maybe a bit expensive though if itís a one off job.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BennyCake on April 13, 2019, 03:00:40 PM
Mantis tiller 4 stroke. Has a  Honda engine. Great job. Even hardened ground turned to fine soil. Maybe a bit expensive though if itís a one off job.

Well I plan to use it more than once  ;D

What sort of money would you be talking for that?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jim Bob on April 13, 2019, 03:21:17 PM
https://mantis.uk.com/product/mantis-deluxe-4-stroke-tillercultivator/

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BennyCake on March 24, 2020, 04:46:24 PM
Thinking of growing a few veg now weíre stuck for the forseeable future.

Anyone recommend a good place online to buy seeds? Tomato, pepper, onions etc.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bogball88 on April 20, 2020, 10:18:52 PM
Such is my prowess at this kind of stuff I'm not sure if this comes under gardening or DIY...

I put some brick pavers down 4/5 years back, this year weeds and moss have started to show plus they could do with a clean. Mr Google has provided mostly contradictory answers. Do Powerhose/ or definitely don't powerhose, bleach, washing powder, specially made up solutions..

Any tips.. ta

I got a 25 litre container of sodium hypochlorite from a builder's yard, fourteen quid. Try that.
Where could you pick up a jar of this now?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bogball88 on April 20, 2020, 10:19:39 PM
Powerhosing not a good thing in my book esp if pavers are just held with sand. Did it once years ago and never again.

Nowadays I just put down diluted hypochlorite 3:1 (deosan red label). Apply in the dry and rinse off a half day later for best results. I just use a watering can with reduced flow spout and I cover some size of an area at not that great an expense. I get a drum for around £18. If you were to cover the same area with weedol or an equivalent it would be £100ís

Use gloves and welly boots and clothes you can handle a stain on as this stuff strips the die outta clothes quickly. Other than that, keep the kids clear and donít mind the smell that will linger for a few days like a swimming pool ...

Why so?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: marty34 on April 20, 2020, 10:54:50 PM
Such is my prowess at this kind of stuff I'm not sure if this comes under gardening or DIY...

I put some brick pavers down 4/5 years back, this year weeds and moss have started to show plus they could do with a clean. Mr Google has provided mostly contradictory answers. Do Powerhose/ or definitely don't powerhose, bleach, washing powder, specially made up solutions..

Any tips.. ta

I got a 25 litre container of sodium hypochlorite from a builder's yard, fourteen quid. Try that.
Where could you pick up a jar of this now?

A builder's yard that sells animal feeds.  I think they are still open.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Tony Baloney on April 20, 2020, 10:59:31 PM
Such is my prowess at this kind of stuff I'm not sure if this comes under gardening or DIY...

I put some brick pavers down 4/5 years back, this year weeds and moss have started to show plus they could do with a clean. Mr Google has provided mostly contradictory answers. Do Powerhose/ or definitely don't powerhose, bleach, washing powder, specially made up solutions..

Any tips.. ta

I got a 25 litre container of sodium hypochlorite from a builder's yard, fourteen quid. Try that.
Where could you pick up a jar of this now?

A builder's yard that sells animal feeds.  I think they are still open.
You've reminded me that's something I need to pick up. Fane Valley in Armagh do it. Acheson and Glover have advised me against power washing their pavers.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bigfrank on April 21, 2020, 01:40:37 PM
Bought a turnkey house last year,lawn at the front has grew out pretty well but the back lawn hasnít had the same progress,it had far more stones in it and is likely full of hard fill,broken pavers etc underneath that contractor wanted rid off on site lol. Itís quite mossy and has small clumps of rush type grass through it. Would something like miracle grow and daily watering gradually help grass growth and suffocate the weed type areas??

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: gaafan2 on April 21, 2020, 02:23:19 PM
Bought a turnkey house last year,lawn at the front has grew out pretty well but the back lawn hasnít had the same progress,it had far more stones in it and is likely full of hard fill,broken pavers etc underneath that contractor wanted rid off on site lol. Itís quite mossy and has small clumps of rush type grass through it. Would something like miracle grow and daily watering gradually help grass growth and suffocate the weed type areas??

In the same predicament myself, only for moss I'd have nothing on the back lawn.

I've also a feeling the contractor has loaded it with hard fill and waste materials.

Any advise would be welcome.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: general on April 21, 2020, 02:26:20 PM
also in this predicament.

the front of the house is growing well in places, poor in others, im in the house 4 1/2 years now.

id imagine ive spent in the region of 500 quid on feeds, seeds etc.

these contractors throw the unwanted materials in and 3 inches of poor quality top soil on top, then seed it. cheap as possible.

ive been toying with the idea of a couple of loads of top soil and barrowing it to the back of my house. serious work involved however I think its the only option at this stage. something seriously wrong if grass refuses to grow
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Milltown Row2 on April 21, 2020, 02:34:21 PM
also in this predicament.

the front of the house is growing well in places, poor in others, im in the house 4 1/2 years now.

id imagine ive spent in the region of 500 quid on feeds, seeds etc.

these contractors throw the unwanted materials in and 3 inches of poor quality top soil on top, then seed it. cheap as possible.

ive been toying with the idea of a couple of loads of top soil and barrowing it to the back of my house. serious work involved however I think its the only option at this stage. something seriously wrong if grass refuses to grow

I got Green Thumb in years ago to do a bitta stuff as we are not green fingers at all, the did a few treatments at the start and they come twice a year, initially it cost a bit (not too much) but they manage to maintain a very difficult lawn. The two treatments cost around 30 quid each, if the garden had taken a beating of the autumn winter period I get them out again.

Have flower beds around the outside of the lawns which are easy kept plants, would love a real flush looking garden but like most people the builders werenít great when left with the garden
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bigfrank on April 21, 2020, 02:35:45 PM
Yes much more effort put into front of house by contractor as itís on show and in my case attached to another house,back garden I have filled buckets of stones off it around the fence edge,also tried to make holes in garden before I threw down garden seed and every time I drove fork in it seemed to hit something hard.

Cut the small rush clumps out at the stump one day,tried to get root and all and filled hole with top soil taken from a site my brother is building on. Seeds havenít really done anything yet a week later,possibly crap quality or need more time. Few handfuls of fertiliser help??
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Tony Baloney on April 21, 2020, 03:18:38 PM
also in this predicament.

the front of the house is growing well in places, poor in others, im in the house 4 1/2 years now.

id imagine ive spent in the region of 500 quid on feeds, seeds etc.

these contractors throw the unwanted materials in and 3 inches of poor quality top soil on top, then seed it. cheap as possible.

ive been toying with the idea of a couple of loads of top soil and barrowing it to the back of my house. serious work involved however I think its the only option at this stage. something seriously wrong if grass refuses to grow
Wasting time feeding it as it can't grow in poor soil. It's like painting over a damp patch. The rushes etc. are a result of poor drainage so I'd say all the reasons you have cited re. fill etc. are correct. Contractors are c***ts for this, people are paying for the house inc. site, not just the 4 walls and a roof.

I don't see how you resolve it without a mini-digger and a trailer to get the area properly drained and then put at least a foot of topsoil on it and re-seed.

My lawn is similar but it's on clay soil so there are parts where the water just lies after heavy rain. I'm getting a fella to do some fencing and when he has his digger out I'm going to get him to dig some sort of drainage into the lawn then fill it with clean stones and cover with a bit of soil and re-seed. It's a bollox!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: trueblue1234 on April 21, 2020, 03:26:05 PM
Leather jackets!!!  >:( >:( >:( >:( >:(

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: trueblue1234 on April 21, 2020, 03:29:44 PM
also in this predicament.

the front of the house is growing well in places, poor in others, im in the house 4 1/2 years now.

id imagine ive spent in the region of 500 quid on feeds, seeds etc.

these contractors throw the unwanted materials in and 3 inches of poor quality top soil on top, then seed it. cheap as possible.

ive been toying with the idea of a couple of loads of top soil and barrowing it to the back of my house. serious work involved however I think its the only option at this stage. something seriously wrong if grass refuses to grow
Wasting time feeding it as it can't grow in poor soil. It's like painting over a damp patch. The rushes etc. are a result of poor drainage so I'd say all the reasons you have cited re. fill etc. are correct. Contractors are c***ts for this, people are paying for the house inc. site, not just the 4 walls and a roof.

I don't see how you resolve it without a mini-digger and a trailer to get the area properly drained and then put at least a foot of topsoil on it and re-seed.

My lawn is similar but it's on clay soil so there are parts where the water just lies after heavy rain. I'm getting a fella to do some fencing and when he has his digger out I'm going to get him to dig some sort of drainage into the lawn then fill it with clean stones and cover with a bit of soil and re-seed. It's a bollox!

Lawn needs very little depth to grow to be fair. But quality of the soil might be a bigger issues. Check for Leather jackets as as well if your suffering bad growth in patches!! Humpy little feckers!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Milltown Row2 on April 21, 2020, 03:31:03 PM
also in this predicament.

the front of the house is growing well in places, poor in others, im in the house 4 1/2 years now.

id imagine ive spent in the region of 500 quid on feeds, seeds etc.

these contractors throw the unwanted materials in and 3 inches of poor quality top soil on top, then seed it. cheap as possible.

ive been toying with the idea of a couple of loads of top soil and barrowing it to the back of my house. serious work involved however I think its the only option at this stage. something seriously wrong if grass refuses to grow
Wasting time feeding it as it can't grow in poor soil. It's like painting over a damp patch. The rushes etc. are a result of poor drainage so I'd say all the reasons you have cited re. fill etc. are correct. Contractors are c***ts for this, people are paying for the house inc. site, not just the 4 walls and a roof.

I don't see how you resolve it without a mini-digger and a trailer to get the area properly drained and then put at least a foot of topsoil on it and re-seed.

My lawn is similar but it's on clay soil so there are parts where the water just lies after heavy rain. I'm getting a fella to do some fencing and when he has his digger out I'm going to get him to dig some sort of drainage into the lawn then fill it with clean stones and cover with a bit of soil and re-seed. It's a bollox!

Lawn needs very little depth to grow to be fair. But quality of the soil might be a bigger issues. Check for Leather jackets as as well if your suffering bad growth in patches!! Humpy little feckers!!

Ive one spot in the garden which is a water pit, its getting stoned and paved as soon as lockdown is over! Fed up after 16 years
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: trueblue1234 on April 21, 2020, 03:45:09 PM
also in this predicament.

the front of the house is growing well in places, poor in others, im in the house 4 1/2 years now.

id imagine ive spent in the region of 500 quid on feeds, seeds etc.

these contractors throw the unwanted materials in and 3 inches of poor quality top soil on top, then seed it. cheap as possible.

ive been toying with the idea of a couple of loads of top soil and barrowing it to the back of my house. serious work involved however I think its the only option at this stage. something seriously wrong if grass refuses to grow
Wasting time feeding it as it can't grow in poor soil. It's like painting over a damp patch. The rushes etc. are a result of poor drainage so I'd say all the reasons you have cited re. fill etc. are correct. Contractors are c***ts for this, people are paying for the house inc. site, not just the 4 walls and a roof.

I don't see how you resolve it without a mini-digger and a trailer to get the area properly drained and then put at least a foot of topsoil on it and re-seed.

My lawn is similar but it's on clay soil so there are parts where the water just lies after heavy rain. I'm getting a fella to do some fencing and when he has his digger out I'm going to get him to dig some sort of drainage into the lawn then fill it with clean stones and cover with a bit of soil and re-seed. It's a bollox!

Lawn needs very little depth to grow to be fair. But quality of the soil might be a bigger issues. Check for Leather jackets as as well if your suffering bad growth in patches!! Humpy little feckers!!

Ive one spot in the garden which is a water pit, its getting stoned and paved as soon as lockdown is over! Fed up after 16 years

How big is the spot? Have you tried a Soak away?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Milltown Row2 on April 21, 2020, 03:55:38 PM
also in this predicament.

the front of the house is growing well in places, poor in others, im in the house 4 1/2 years now.

id imagine ive spent in the region of 500 quid on feeds, seeds etc.

these contractors throw the unwanted materials in and 3 inches of poor quality top soil on top, then seed it. cheap as possible.

ive been toying with the idea of a couple of loads of top soil and barrowing it to the back of my house. serious work involved however I think its the only option at this stage. something seriously wrong if grass refuses to grow
Wasting time feeding it as it can't grow in poor soil. It's like painting over a damp patch. The rushes etc. are a result of poor drainage so I'd say all the reasons you have cited re. fill etc. are correct. Contractors are c***ts for this, people are paying for the house inc. site, not just the 4 walls and a roof.

I don't see how you resolve it without a mini-digger and a trailer to get the area properly drained and then put at least a foot of topsoil on it and re-seed.

My lawn is similar but it's on clay soil so there are parts where the water just lies after heavy rain. I'm getting a fella to do some fencing and when he has his digger out I'm going to get him to dig some sort of drainage into the lawn then fill it with clean stones and cover with a bit of soil and re-seed. It's a bollox!

Lawn needs very little depth to grow to be fair. But quality of the soil might be a bigger issues. Check for Leather jackets as as well if your suffering bad growth in patches!! Humpy little feckers!!

Ive one spot in the garden which is a water pit, its getting stoned and paved as soon as lockdown is over! Fed up after 16 years

How big is the spot? Have you tried a Soak away?

Its at the side where there is no sun up against the fence and its always given me hassle, dug it up years ago, stoned it and whatever else I cant remember was fine for 2 years then it just turned into a bog, in fairness its not that big
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: TabClear on April 21, 2020, 04:56:30 PM
Yes much more effort put into front of house by contractor as itís on show and in my case attached to another house,back garden I have filled buckets of stones off it around the fence edge,also tried to make holes in garden before I threw down garden seed and every time I drove fork in it seemed to hit something hard.

Cut the small rush clumps out at the stump one day,tried to get root and all and filled hole with top soil taken from a site my brother is building on. Seeds havenít really done anything yet a week later,possibly crap quality or need more time. Few handfuls of fertiliser help??

Some fert will make a big difference but I would say the lack of rain over the last few weeks has not helped. Get the hose on it for a while would help a lot.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bigfrank on April 21, 2020, 09:36:54 PM
Got a bucket of fertiliser off my father in law earlier,gonna sew it out 2Moro by hand as donít have a spreader,should be ok if I scatter equally right?? Should I soak the lawn first,always thought farmers wanted rain before they put it on fields. Then continue to water few times 2Moro and each day then??

Itís not overly long but maybe should cut it first,maybe rake away moss and loose stones etc,spend hour or two doing some prep.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: general on April 21, 2020, 10:00:58 PM
Whats the smallest quantity of fertilizer that can be bought? thought about this myself but would it ruin the garden all together? Asked a local farmer not so long ago and he more or less told me to F&%k off
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bigfrank on April 21, 2020, 10:47:48 PM
Really not sure but her dad is into the farming and had a ton bag in the shed so I just filled a bucket,will rob another bucket if need be lol. Everyone online is saying to buy a spreader etc but itís a small area,think il chance by hand or maybe try make some kinda device to spread it.

Will try keep lawn watered for the next while,might do prep work like I said before,maybe use pitch fork break up the ground a bit to allow fertiliser to penetrate the soil,I know nothing about gardening but Iím one of them pricks that will try anything once lol
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: thewobbler on April 21, 2020, 11:59:19 PM
Iím definitely not an expert by any stretch.

But it youíre looking to turn a mishmash of everything into a lawn, instead of hoping fertiliser only helps the things you want, and everything else gets weaker,  Iíd start by killing everything, literally everything, then turning, and raking the soil, and planting lawn seed only.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: johnnycool on April 22, 2020, 09:41:30 AM
Whats the smallest quantity of fertilizer that can be bought? thought about this myself but would it ruin the garden all together? Asked a local farmer not so long ago and he more or less told me to F&%k off


Get a hep bag of cow/horse dung, fill a barrel of water and let the bag of dung soak in it.

After a day or so the water in that barrel will be better than any fertilizer.

You lads with the wet patches, when you stone it, where is the water meant to go to?

you might need a bit of drainage pipe and then stones to allow the water away (into a neighbours garden  ;D  )
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: LeoMc on April 22, 2020, 10:34:00 AM
Whats the smallest quantity of fertilizer that can be bought? thought about this myself but would it ruin the garden all together? Asked a local farmer not so long ago and he more or less told me to F&%k off


Get a hep bag of cow/horse dung, fill a barrel of water and let the bag of dung soak in it.

After a day or so the water in that barrel will be better than any fertilizer.


You lads with the wet patches, when you stone it, where is the water meant to go to?

you might need a bit of drainage pipe and then stones to allow the water away (into a neighbours garden  ;D  )
Nettles in the barrel / bucket of water is another great job for good lawn / plant food.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Aristo 60 on April 22, 2020, 11:26:52 AM
Might have to try this.

 I bought a spreader and bags of fertilizer weeks ago. Spreader was a complicated tool to assemble but I neednít have bothered as the fertilizer still hasnít arrived..
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bigfrank on April 22, 2020, 01:26:32 PM
Might have to try this.

 I bought a spreader and bags of fertilizer weeks ago. Spreader was a complicated tool to assemble but I neednít have bothered as the fertilizer still hasnít arrived..

You will take handy money for that spreader then lol Iím out all morning at my lawn messing about with it,pulling weeds,raking moss,lifting stones.might get more top soil from my brothers site and fill in few low spots around posts etc gonna give it a cut then and strim after my 1.00pm tea break and water it,maybe chance the fertiliser by hand 2moro or go get miracle grow/lawn seed
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: redzone on April 22, 2020, 01:28:37 PM
If you are near a farmers field go and lift a few cow claps with shovel(they will be hardened up with the sun so easy lifted). Break them up and scatter them round the lawn. Use a rake every few days to pull the manue into a new spot. Works a treat 👌
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fear Bun Na Sceilpe on April 22, 2020, 02:38:03 PM
Can you move a clemitis from pot to ground now, first buds starting to bloom, itís a big pot
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bogball88 on April 22, 2020, 03:09:19 PM
I have the hypochlorite down on the yards and pvers. Rinse it off after a few hours or let it settle for a day?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: redzone on April 22, 2020, 03:18:05 PM
I have the hypochlorite down on the yards and pvers. Rinse it off after a few hours or let it settle for a day?
Best to wet the area first and then spray it on. Best to do it at night time and let it soak over night. Wash of next morning.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: armaghniac on April 22, 2020, 03:25:14 PM
If you are near a farmers field go and lift a few cow claps with shovel(they will be hardened up with the sun so easy lifted). Break them up and scatter them round the lawn. Use a rake every few days to pull the manue into a new spot. Works a treat 👌

So your advice is basically bullshit.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: redzone on April 22, 2020, 05:44:58 PM
If you are near a farmers field go and lift a few cow claps with shovel(they will be hardened up with the sun so easy lifted). Break them up and scatter them round the lawn. Use a rake every few days to pull the manue into a new spot. Works a treat 👌

So your advice is basically bullshit.
U should have played along, could got a few gullible townies out
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bogball88 on April 22, 2020, 09:25:39 PM
I have the hypochlorite down on the yards and pvers. Rinse it off after a few hours or let it settle for a day?
Best to wet the area first and then spray it on. Best to do it at night time and let it soak over night. Wash of next morning.
Power wash or hose off?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: redzone on April 22, 2020, 09:51:41 PM
I have the hypochlorite down on the yards and pvers. Rinse it off after a few hours or let it settle for a day?
Best to wet the area first and then spray it on. Best to do it at night time and let it soak over night. Wash of next morning.
Power wash or hose off?
Hose is OK. If u new it was gonna rain during the night that would do as well. I find it works best when u soak the area well first with water.
Sometimes it might take 2 goes if it's dirty enough
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bigfrank on April 22, 2020, 10:53:13 PM
I used washing powder on my pavers as recommended to me by a friend,worked a treat,good soaking of washer and then scatter the powder,light brush and hose off,worked a treat
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: LeoMc on April 23, 2020, 02:57:45 PM
I used washing powder on my pavers as recommended to me by a friend,worked a treat,good soaking of washer and then scatter the powder,light brush and hose off,worked a treat
Seconded. Leaves a great smell round the yard too.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: marty34 on April 24, 2020, 08:30:34 AM
I used washing powder on my pavers as recommended to me by a friend,worked a treat,good soaking of washer and then scatter the powder,light brush and hose off,worked a treat
Seconded. Leaves a great smell round the yard too.

Any tips to clean tarmac and concrete?

Just standard powerwashing.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: fearsiuil on April 24, 2020, 11:25:15 AM
Can you move a clemitis from pot to ground now, first buds starting to bloom, itís a big pot
Of course you can, plant a few inches deeper than it is in the pot. Put some stones or similar on ground above roots to keep cool. Don't let plant dry out over next 3 weeks or so. Make sure you are planting in suitable spot.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: redzone on April 24, 2020, 11:47:48 AM
Tarmac I definitely wouldn't be using a power washer. U could blow a hole in it very easy. Even a concrete street I wouldn't use a power washer, I would use the hypochlorite. Scrub it with a yard brush if its really dirty when u have the acid down. Might take a few goes. U can get a great wee hand held sprayer,i think hozelock make them. 5 litres it holds. You have it then for spraying weeds
There is some power in some of them power washers and at the end of the day u want your concrete, paving or tarmac to last forever. A power washer will only weaken the top of it
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bigarsedkeeper on April 24, 2020, 12:04:18 PM
Tarmac I definitely wouldn't be using a power washer. U could blow a hole in it very easy. Even a concrete street I wouldn't use a power washer, I would use the hypochlorite. Scrub it with a yard brush if its really dirty when u have the acid down. Might take a few goes. U can get a great wee hand held sprayer,i think hozelock make them. 5 litres it holds. You have it then for spraying weeds
There is some power in some of them power washers and at the end of the day u want your concrete, paving or tarmac to last forever. A power washer will only weaken the top of it
Just be careful with the concentration of the bleach mix. Water it down a bit more than on paving, it can break down the asphalt bond if too strong. I had a company in washing the render down on the house a while ago and he lowered the concentration and washed the SMA (stone mastic asphalt) too. Made a great job on it because with it being a bit more porous moss and algae grow well in it and power washing won't take it off anyway.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: GJL on April 24, 2020, 12:10:45 PM
Tarmac I definitely wouldn't be using a power washer. U could blow a hole in it very easy. Even a concrete street I wouldn't use a power washer, I would use the hypochlorite. Scrub it with a yard brush if its really dirty when u have the acid down. Might take a few goes. U can get a great wee hand held sprayer,i think hozelock make them. 5 litres it holds. You have it then for spraying weeds
There is some power in some of them power washers and at the end of the day u want your concrete, paving or tarmac to last forever. A power washer will only weaken the top of it

I would agree with you on the tar but concrete should be fine for power hose. If the power hose damages the concrete then you have very poor concrete down that the frost will wreck anyway.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: redzone on April 24, 2020, 12:23:23 PM
I'm not saying power washer will damage the concrete, just weaken it. It takes years for concrete to fully cure. I wouldnt be to trusting on the amount of cement that goes into some of the mixes either.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: GJL on April 24, 2020, 03:17:57 PM
I'm not saying power washer will damage the concrete, just weaken it. It takes years for concrete to fully cure. I wouldnt be to trusting on the amount of cement that goes into some of the mixes either.

Yes I agree that there is poor quality stuff out there. If the mix is right power hosing is no problem. I have a large retail yard that gets power hosed once and sometime twice a year. It is 18 years old and washes up like new.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Fear Bun Na Sceilpe on May 05, 2020, 08:28:33 AM
Can you move a clemitis from pot to ground now, first buds starting to bloom, itís a big pot
Of course you can, plant a few inches deeper than it is in the pot. Put some stones or similar on ground above roots to keep cool. Don't let plant dry out over next 3 weeks or so. Make sure you are planting in suitable spot.

Just seeing this now, went ahead and done that after reading up, thanks, seems good so far
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: trueblue1234 on May 12, 2020, 09:17:24 AM
Looking at a new hedge cutter. Have always went petrol in the past but hearing some positive feedback on some of the battery power ones and that they have improved greatly. Anyone any experience of them? Will be doing a mix of heavy and light work. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: screenexile on May 12, 2020, 09:20:33 AM
Looking at a new hedge cutter. Have always went petrol in the past but hearing some positive feedback on some of the battery power ones and that they have improved greatly. Anyone any experience of them? Will be doing a mix of heavy and light work.

I have great experience of cutting the power cord 17 times when i try to use it!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: trueblue1234 on May 12, 2020, 09:32:39 AM
Looking at a new hedge cutter. Have always went petrol in the past but hearing some positive feedback on some of the battery power ones and that they have improved greatly. Anyone any experience of them? Will be doing a mix of heavy and light work.

I have great experience of cutting the power cord 17 times when i try to use it!!

Yeah would stay away from corded, distance is an issue.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: fearsiuil on May 12, 2020, 01:02:49 PM
Looking at a new hedge cutter. Have always went petrol in the past but hearing some positive feedback on some of the battery power ones and that they have improved greatly. Anyone any experience of them? Will be doing a mix of heavy and light work.
Check duration charged battery lasts (plus recharging time)and ability to cut the heavy stuff you mention. I use a 2 stroke double sided Stihl which is pricey but nothing better that will cut all day if you have enough mix.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jim Bob on May 12, 2020, 01:08:50 PM
I bought the Stihl  94 Kombi system with the hedge trimmer and pole pruner attachments. Pricy but well worth it. Other attachments available as well.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: trueblue1234 on May 12, 2020, 02:36:45 PM
Cheers. Yeah would worry about the bigger stuff with a battery powered one. But then had heard that they've come along in leaps and bounds and are a lot lighter than the petrol.

How much was the Stihl combi out of interest?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: fearsiuil on May 12, 2020, 03:07:27 PM
Cheers. Yeah would worry about the bigger stuff with a battery powered one. But then had heard that they've come along in leaps and bounds and are a lot lighter than the petrol.

How much was the Stihl combi out of interest?

The attachments fit all the different engine units, there is 3 or 4 different engine sizes.

https://www.irishmowers.com/stihl-kombi-system.html
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jim Bob on May 12, 2020, 06:58:44 PM
https://www.frjonesandson.co.uk/#sqr:(q%5BStihl%20kombi%20%5D)

I dealt with this crowd at the start of the year. Very competitive prices and free delivery to the occupied state
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bogball88 on May 13, 2020, 11:19:53 AM
Got a bucket of fertiliser off my father in law earlier,gonna sew it out 2Moro by hand as donít have a spreader,should be ok if I scatter equally right?? Should I soak the lawn first,always thought farmers wanted rain before they put it on fields. Then continue to water few times 2Moro and each day then??

Itís not overly long but maybe should cut it first,maybe rake away moss and loose stones etc,spend hour or two doing some prep.

How did you get on with the fertiliser? Got a few buckets myself and thinking of getting it on to green it up a bit. All moss/fog gone so just left with a few thin/bare patches
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BennyCake on May 13, 2020, 02:25:46 PM
Anyone growing tomatoes?

I planted some from seed but theyíre taking forever. Only 3/4 inches and growing very slow. I have them under plastic, and indoors at night so cold isnít a problem.

Planted sweet corn seedlings though, theyíre flying.

Scallions doing well too.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: LeoMc on May 13, 2020, 04:17:15 PM
Anyone growing tomatoes?

I planted some from seed but theyíre taking forever. Only 3/4 inches and growing very slow. I have them under plastic, and indoors at night so cold isnít a problem.

Planted sweet corn seedlings though, theyíre flying.

Scallions doing well too.

Have you them in big enough pots? At 3-4 inches they would be root bound in a 9cm pot.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BennyCake on May 13, 2020, 05:53:06 PM
Anyone growing tomatoes?

I planted some from seed but theyíre taking forever. Only 3/4 inches and growing very slow. I have them under plastic, and indoors at night so cold isnít a problem.

Planted sweet corn seedlings though, theyíre flying.

Scallions doing well too.

Have you them in big enough pots? At 3-4 inches they would be root bound in a 9cm pot.

Yeah pots are big enough. The roots arenít filling the whole pot yet so should have plenty of nutrients there
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bigfrank on May 13, 2020, 06:26:53 PM
Got a bucket of fertiliser off my father in law earlier,gonna sew it out 2Moro by hand as donít have a spreader,should be ok if I scatter equally right?? Should I soak the lawn first,always thought farmers wanted rain before they put it on fields. Then continue to water few times 2Moro and each day then??

Itís not overly long but maybe should cut it first,maybe rake away moss and loose stones etc,spend hour or two doing some prep.

How did you get on with the fertiliser? Got a few buckets myself and thinking of getting it on to green it up a bit. All moss/fog gone so just left with a few thin/bare patches

Itís getting there slowly,I wouldnít have great patience tho lol. Near two weeks from I raked it to within an inch of its life,sewed grass seed and fertiliser,water it daily as there had been very little rain,not sure if I should be watering it more tho,can you over water grass in weather like this??

Gonna let it grow fairly long,maybe take a light cut off it and ket clippings stay on it,heard this may help,stay tuned....
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bogball88 on May 14, 2020, 04:46:40 PM
Got a bucket of fertiliser off my father in law earlier,gonna sew it out 2Moro by hand as donít have a spreader,should be ok if I scatter equally right?? Should I soak the lawn first,always thought farmers wanted rain before they put it on fields. Then continue to water few times 2Moro and each day then??

Itís not overly long but maybe should cut it first,maybe rake away moss and loose stones etc,spend hour or two doing some prep.

How did you get on with the fertiliser? Got a few buckets myself and thinking of getting it on to green it up a bit. All moss/fog gone so just left with a few thin/bare patches

Itís getting there slowly,I wouldnít have great patience tho lol. Near two weeks from I raked it to within an inch of its life,sewed grass seed and fertiliser,water it daily as there had been very little rain,not sure if I should be watering it more tho,can you over water grass in weather like this??

Gonna let it grow fairly long,maybe take a light cut off it and ket clippings stay on it,heard this may help,stay tuned....
I await with excitement your next update  :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: bigfrank on May 14, 2020, 10:13:46 PM
Got a bucket of fertiliser off my father in law earlier,gonna sew it out 2Moro by hand as donít have a spreader,should be ok if I scatter equally right?? Should I soak the lawn first,always thought farmers wanted rain before they put it on fields. Then continue to water few times 2Moro and each day then??

Itís not overly long but maybe should cut it first,maybe rake away moss and loose stones etc,spend hour or two doing some prep.

Maybe il do a daily blog,audience seems to be there for it  ;D ;D

How did you get on with the fertiliser? Got a few buckets myself and thinking of getting it on to green it up a bit. All moss/fog gone so just left with a few thin/bare patches

Itís getting there slowly,I wouldnít have great patience tho lol. Near two weeks from I raked it to within an inch of its life,sewed grass seed and fertiliser,water it daily as there had been very little rain,not sure if I should be watering it more tho,can you over water grass in weather like this??

Gonna let it grow fairly long,maybe take a light cut off it and ket clippings stay on it,heard this may help,stay tuned....
I await with excitement your next update  :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: screenexile on May 14, 2020, 11:13:50 PM
Times have fair changed lads!!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Tony Baloney on May 14, 2020, 11:41:25 PM
Times have fair changed lads!!!
Indeed. The missus has now taken up gardening beyond her usual "you'd need to get the grass cut" or "you missed a bit when you were strimming". To be fair the place has never looked tidier.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jim Bob on May 15, 2020, 09:59:22 PM
Went to buy a couple of pigs last week to be told that quite a number of people have bought to keep for 3 or 4 months before they go to the slaughterhouse. People with a small piece of ground had the time to throw up a fence and electric wire and go from there.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BennyCake on May 22, 2020, 07:11:28 PM
Backstard slugs eating the shite out of my carrots.

Any eco friendly methods of keeping these bollixes away?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Walter Cronc on May 22, 2020, 08:25:17 PM
Backstard slugs eating the shite out of my carrots.

Any eco friendly methods of keeping these bollixes away?

Have heard both dried seaweed and small tray of beer works. Salt too obviously but can be messy  8)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: macdanger2 on May 23, 2020, 11:38:36 AM
Backstard slugs eating the shite out of my carrots.

Any eco friendly methods of keeping these bollixes away?

Get a jar, bury it so the top is level with the soil and fill 3/4 with beer. You'll have loads of them in there in the morning
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Nanderson on May 24, 2020, 10:29:24 AM
Anyone got any experience in using Iron Sulphate to help remove moss in garden?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: trueblue1234 on May 24, 2020, 07:47:59 PM
Yeah good job. But an unsightly mess once down. Turns the moss black so things get worse before they get better. But once raked out and reseeded it tidied up a great job.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: snoopdog on May 24, 2020, 10:18:58 PM
Backstard slugs eating the shite out of my carrots.

Any eco friendly methods of keeping these bollixes away?

Have heard both dried seaweed and small tray of beer works. Salt too obviously but can be messy  8)
Yep if you can spare the beer. It works a treat.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Jim Bob on May 25, 2020, 01:39:10 AM
Anyone any solution to eradicating weeds growing through tarmac?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: APM on May 25, 2020, 11:16:18 AM
You have to get them when they are small.  I burn them off with a gas weed burner.  Something like this. 
https://www.homebargains.co.uk/products/10690-gosystem-weed-burner-wb2012.aspx

If you spray them first, wait till they brown off and then burn them after some decent weather it should clean the place up a bit.