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Non GAA Discussion => General discussion => Topic started by: JPF on July 23, 2009, 01:29:28 PM

Title: building a house
Post by: JPF on July 23, 2009, 01:29:28 PM
Hi all Ive been a long term reader/fan of this board and rarely have the time to contribute, but am building a 3500 sguare foot house and am looking advice on the following if theres any peoiple with experiences, Id appreciate this, ive seen a lot of stuff so its real experience im looking without the blurb.
1) Efficient heating system - at this stage Im almost certainly not going for ufloor heating - too many scare stories, so I need to go for a different system, assuming rads and probably oil - is there any options? Also insulation needs and eg heat recovery systems / solar panel experiences etc.  Pressured water systems.'
2) Smart home systems - Surround sound in a couple of rooms / lighting / security cameras / bband /tv etc.  What are the options on a sensible enough budget?
Thanks
JPF
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: The Subbie on July 23, 2009, 02:30:39 PM
http://gaaboard.com/board/index.php?topic=13086.0  (http://gaaboard.com/board/index.php?topic=13086.0)

Check this fella out, he's from Laois but despite that i'd say he's your man
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: downtown on February 16, 2019, 10:31:15 PM
hi all, trying to get a house build and looking about the exterior off the house. we had our heart set on stone but its going to cost to much. just wondering is there any other alternatives that is similar to stone than is cheaper? thanks in advance
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: trueblue1234 on February 16, 2019, 11:23:04 PM
Take it youíve looked at the cladding? McGonigles do one and is much cheaper than full stone. Are you looking to do the full house in stone? Sometimes just the outshots/ porch/ sunroom can set a house off without the cost off all stone.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Owen Brannigan on February 17, 2019, 10:35:48 AM
hi all, trying to get a house build and looking about the exterior off the house. we had our heart set on stone but its going to cost to much. just wondering is there any other alternatives that is similar to stone than is cheaper? thanks in advance

Surely the cost is in the labour regardless of whether you clad in real or manufactured stone.  Agree with TrueBlue, stone as a feature can work best against a rendered finish or in combination with some wood cladding.  Too much stone of a particular hue can be hard to look at long term.

This self-build exhibition is on this week and will have stone dressers and manufacturers:

https://www.facebook.com/events/528577350979039/ (https://www.facebook.com/events/528577350979039/)

In relation to stone have you checked out:

https://www.coolestone.co.uk (https://www.coolestone.co.uk)

http://www.aurastone.co.uk (http://www.aurastone.co.uk)

http://www.naturalstoneindustries.com (http://www.naturalstoneindustries.com)

Tullylish Stone
41 Blue Road,
Gilford,
Craigavon,
County Armagh,
BT63 6DA
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: balladmaker on February 17, 2019, 10:37:00 AM
As mentioned by Trueblue1234, McMonagles have a 'Stoneer', which is basically a veneer of real stone facing .... so when it's on, you cannot tell the difference.  I did a porch and sunroom in full stone as they didnt have the stoneer option at the time, but if doing it again, would do it in stoneer, much cheaper and same effect.  I love natural stone on a house.  Have a contact for a brilliant stone mason based in the north but he seems to work everywhere, if you need it, PM me.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: giveherlong on February 17, 2019, 11:57:05 AM
Hi all Ive been a long term reader/fan of this board and rarely have the time to contribute, but am building a 3500 sguare foot house and am looking advice on the following if theres any peoiple with experiences, Id appreciate this, ive seen a lot of stuff so its real experience im looking without the blurb.
1) Efficient heating system - at this stage Im almost certainly not going for ufloor heating - too many scare stories, so I need to go for a different system, assuming rads and probably oil - is there any options? Also insulation needs and eg heat recovery systems / solar panel experiences etc.  Pressured water systems.'
2) Smart home systems - Surround sound in a couple of rooms / lighting / security cameras / bband /tv etc.  What are the options on a sensible enough budget?
Thanks
JPF

Thereís an excellent group on Facebook: Self Build & Rennovations Ireland
All your questions will be answered on there if you use the search facility
Self build show also in titanic belfast this coming week. Tickets can be got for free on Self Build live Belfast on Facebook
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Ambrose on February 17, 2019, 04:19:42 PM
Hi all Ive been a long term reader/fan of this board and rarely have the time to contribute, but am building a 3500 sguare foot house and am looking advice on the following if theres any peoiple with experiences, Id appreciate this, ive seen a lot of stuff so its real experience im looking without the blurb.
1) Efficient heating system - at this stage Im almost certainly not going for ufloor heating - too many scare stories, so I need to go for a different system, assuming rads and probably oil - is there any options? Also insulation needs and eg heat recovery systems / solar panel experiences etc.  Pressured water systems.'
2) Smart home systems - Surround sound in a couple of rooms / lighting / security cameras / bband /tv etc.  What are the options on a sensible enough budget?
Thanks
JPF

Thereís an excellent group on Facebook: Self Build & Rennovations Ireland
All your questions will be answered on there if you use the search facility
Self build show also in titanic belfast this coming week. Tickets can be got for free on Self Build live Belfast on Facebook

Youíd like to think he has the house built and the family nearly reared in the ten years between the two posts.

Title: Re: building a house
Post by: armaghniac on February 17, 2019, 06:56:49 PM
Hi all Ive been a long term reader/fan of this board and rarely have the time to contribute, but am building a 3500 sguare foot house and am looking advice on the following if theres any peoiple with experiences, Id appreciate this, ive seen a lot of stuff so its real experience im looking without the blurb.
1) Efficient heating system - at this stage Im almost certainly not going for ufloor heating - too many scare stories, so I need to go for a different system, assuming rads and probably oil - is there any options? Also insulation needs and eg heat recovery systems / solar panel experiences etc.  Pressured water systems.'
2) Smart home systems - Surround sound in a couple of rooms / lighting / security cameras / bband /tv etc.  What are the options on a sensible enough budget?
Thanks
JPF

Thereís an excellent group on Facebook: Self Build & Rennovations Ireland
All your questions will be answered on there if you use the search facility
Self build show also in titanic belfast this coming week. Tickets can be got for free on Self Build live Belfast on Facebook

Youíd like to think he has the house built and the family nearly reared in the ten years between the two posts.

Sure you'd need 10 years to populate a 3500 sq ft house, unless you had several wives.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: awideisneverasgood on February 17, 2019, 07:44:19 PM
hi all, trying to get a house build and looking about the exterior off the house. we had our heart set on stone but its going to cost to much. just wondering is there any other alternatives that is similar to stone than is cheaper? thanks in advance

Recently completed an extension to our house and put some of the cladding on the face of the new extension and the existing porch. Very happy with it turned out and a big saving on stone.

https://www.lbsproducts.com/natural-stone-products/z-stone

Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Mikhail Prokhorov on February 17, 2019, 09:03:01 PM
i thought people were broke these days and pleading poverty  ???
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: From the Bunker on February 17, 2019, 10:03:50 PM
i thought people were broke these days and pleading poverty  ???

Poor and broke people Buy and build houses too!
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: marty34 on February 24, 2019, 12:54:55 PM
We have crows who sit on the guttering directly above the back door.  Unfortunately, as you'd guess, they poop and it falls down on the path at the back door.  They roost in a clump of trees about 200 yards away but seem to use our roof as a place to stop before they head to the trees.

We've a big plastic owl but not much use.  Somebody told me that I need a pretend owl who's head moves occasionally. 

Any ideas?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: trailer on February 24, 2019, 04:35:38 PM
We have crows who sit on the guttering directly above the back door.  Unfortunately, as you'd guess, they poop and it falls down on the path at the back door.  They roost in a clump of trees about 200 yards away but seem to use our roof as a place to stop before they head to the trees.

We've a big plastic owl but not much use.  Somebody told me that I need a pretend owl who's head moves occasionally. 

Any ideas?
Something is attracting them. Have you a farm nearby?
Few ideas.
Shoot a few and hang them up. Not ideal outside the back door.
Poison. But you never heard that from me.
I've seen people with cds hung up light reflecting scares them apparently. Downside is your house looks like it's had a makeover by a hippy.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: TabClear on February 24, 2019, 04:56:58 PM
We have crows who sit on the guttering directly above the back door.  Unfortunately, as you'd guess, they poop and it falls down on the path at the back door.  They roost in a clump of trees about 200 yards away but seem to use our roof as a place to stop before they head to the trees.

We've a big plastic owl but not much use.  Somebody told me that I need a pretend owl who's head moves occasionally. 

Any ideas?

I be heard if you contact NIE and say they are roosting on power lines they will send you out a cd of hawk noises!! No idea if itís effective or how you would even go about it!
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Owen Brannigan on February 24, 2019, 05:01:57 PM

I be heard if you contact NIE and say they are roosting on power lines they will send you out a cd of hawk noises!! No idea if itís effective or how you would even go about it!

https://www.birdbusters.com/scare_bird_deterrent.html (https://www.birdbusters.com/scare_bird_deterrent.html)
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Taylor on March 04, 2019, 11:10:49 AM
Has anyone ever bought houseplans online or is it best to go through a local architect?

Assume it is more expensive to go local?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: gander on March 04, 2019, 11:21:57 AM
Has anyone ever bought houseplans online or is it best to go through a local architect?

Assume it is more expensive to go local?

dunno, But I know my self build mortgage required the architect to sign off on each stage of the build, not sure how thatd work if you bought them online
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: lfdown2 on March 04, 2019, 01:37:11 PM
Has anyone ever bought houseplans online or is it best to go through a local architect?

Assume it is more expensive to go local?

I pulled a set of plans from the internet and passed them to an architect friend to draw up. Don't do it. I have been back through planning twice as what I had used didn't suit the site, my advise would be to get a good architect with experience of the specific type of build you are looking for.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: trueblue1234 on March 11, 2019, 06:09:45 PM
Anyone a rough idea of solicitor price to sell a site? Got a quote and it seems high given the value of the site.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Ambrose on March 11, 2019, 10:14:54 PM
Anyone a rough idea of solicitor price to sell a site? Got a quote and it seems high given the value of the site.

A grand ish plus VAT

Shop around, you could save a decent amount just by making a few phone calls. Also watch they donít try to throw in a few hidden extras.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: 1884 on April 24, 2019, 05:52:15 PM
I am currently looking at drawing up plans.
I was just wondering what the going rate is per sq foot? I am looking to sort out our budget and take it from there. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Have been thinking about a 2500sq ft traditional square build.

I know this can all depend on spec and design etc but any help would be greatly appreciated!
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: clarshack on August 15, 2019, 03:14:25 PM
I am currently looking at drawing up plans.
I was just wondering what the going rate is per sq foot? I am looking to sort out our budget and take it from there. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Have been thinking about a 2500sq ft traditional square build.

I know this can all depend on spec and design etc but any help would be greatly appreciated!

Anyone have an idea on the current rate per square foot? have heard the cost of some materials such as insulation have went sky high.
am looking to build in East Tyrone area and would be a traditional square build as well.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Erne Man on August 15, 2019, 03:41:05 PM
Clarshack - just going through this process at the minute. Bought a site last year, and plans passed back in March, and currently have plans with a number of builders for pricing.
Material prices have increased significantly (even in the last year) - insulation certainly impacted by raw material shortage. GBP rate not helping the material prices, as raw material souring from outside UK. Added to that is the demand for good tradespeople in Greater Dublin, leading to a relative shortage in NI.
Our design isnt the traditional square build (less than 2,500sq ft though), but the architect was estimating a "live-in" price of somewhere between £90 - £100 per sq ft for a good finish, albeit that rate is dependent on what you spend on kitchens, bathrooms, landscaping etc.
To be honest I'm expecting builders prices + a slight uplift on some of their PC sums, to come in around  £110 per sq ft.

Architect and associated Fees, Electricity connection etc could easily add another £5 - £8 per sq ft to that, depending on how rural & complex the site is. We got an NIE quote of £10k for connection, but have spoken to people in more rural locations paying £15k - £18k.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: illdecide on August 15, 2019, 03:55:22 PM
Clarshack - just going through this process at the minute. Bought a site last year, and plans passed back in March, and currently have plans with a number of builders for pricing.
Material prices have increased significantly (even in the last year) - insulation certainly impacted by raw material shortage. GBP rate not helping the material prices, as raw material souring from outside UK. Added to that is the demand for good tradespeople in Greater Dublin, leading to a relative shortage in NI.
Our design isnt the traditional square build (less than 2,500sq ft though), but the architect was estimating a "live-in" price of somewhere between £90 - £100 per sq ft for a good finish, albeit that rate is dependent on what you spend on kitchens, bathrooms, landscaping etc.
To be honest I'm expecting builders prices + a slight uplift on some of their PC sums, to come in around  £110 per sq ft.

Architect and associated Fees, Electricity connection etc could easily add another £5 - £8 per sq ft to that, depending on how rural & complex the site is. We got an NIE quote of £10k for connection, but have spoken to people in more rural locations paying £15k - £18k.

For years it was always priced around £50 - £60 sq foot but as you say things changed a lot over the last decade...Not sure about them rates but you're probably not for away in fairness. Trades men are (good ones) are getting harder to get. there are so many gobshites out there it's not even funny calling themselves tradesmen
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Erne Man on August 15, 2019, 04:23:26 PM
Those rates would be estimated contractor managed build Illdecide - as opposed to true "self-build", which would defintely be cheaper (but seriously time consuming!).
Its not an exaggeration to say the material prices for your housebuild package overall have probably increased by 15% - 20% since the Brexit vote in 2016!
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: clarshack on August 16, 2019, 08:59:00 AM
Clarshack - just going through this process at the minute. Bought a site last year, and plans passed back in March, and currently have plans with a number of builders for pricing.
Material prices have increased significantly (even in the last year) - insulation certainly impacted by raw material shortage. GBP rate not helping the material prices, as raw material souring from outside UK. Added to that is the demand for good tradespeople in Greater Dublin, leading to a relative shortage in NI.
Our design isnt the traditional square build (less than 2,500sq ft though), but the architect was estimating a "live-in" price of somewhere between £90 - £100 per sq ft for a good finish, albeit that rate is dependent on what you spend on kitchens, bathrooms, landscaping etc.
To be honest I'm expecting builders prices + a slight uplift on some of their PC sums, to come in around  £110 per sq ft.

Architect and associated Fees, Electricity connection etc could easily add another £5 - £8 per sq ft to that, depending on how rural & complex the site is. We got an NIE quote of £10k for connection, but have spoken to people in more rural locations paying £15k - £18k.

Thanks, does that price per sq ft include the cost of your site?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: manfromdelmonte on August 16, 2019, 12:03:37 PM
You going with block built or timber frame?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Erne Man on August 16, 2019, 12:06:17 PM
Afraid not Clarshack - site was separate.
To be honest I've been chatting to a few QS's over the past few months, and without them seeing plans etc they are quoting £90 - £100 off the top of their head. That is for walk in, fully contracted build - to good finish i.e. high level insulated, MVHR, u/floor heating, external landscaping etc.
They were all arguing the same factors: material price increases, labour shortages & rates increases.

If you are considering a build the only way to truly know, is to get the plans drawn up and get builders to price. You'll get anecdotal rate guidance like my estimates here, but every build and site are different.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: clarshack on August 16, 2019, 12:31:02 PM
You going with block built or timber frame?

was thinking of timber frame.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: manfromdelmonte on August 16, 2019, 10:59:28 PM
You going with block built or timber frame?

was thinking of timber frame.
Look at SIP housing construction
Set price from the design, delivery date from the factory
Less time on site
Weather tight much quicker - windows ordered off plans
You can get much better standard of insulation all through the house - floor, walls, roof.
Higher airtightness value
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Hereiam on August 17, 2019, 01:06:54 PM
In terms of cost the timber frame house is not much cheaper. I would be carefull with timber frame as i have seen frames going up with poor looking timber bring used, walls distorted in all directions. Air tightness and level of insulation is the pro's. One thing that is a must with timber frame is to install a good MVHR system as the house will be so air tight.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: manfromdelmonte on August 18, 2019, 09:11:32 PM
In terms of cost the timber frame house is not much cheaper. I would be carefull with timber frame as i have seen frames going up with poor looking timber bring used, walls distorted in all directions. Air tightness and level of insulation is the pro's. One thing that is a must with timber frame is to install a good MVHR system as the house will be so air tight.
SIPs
Structural Integrated Panels
Chipboard, solid insulation and internal membrane covered chipboard
House can be up in 10 days
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: liam_shack on August 19, 2019, 02:47:17 PM
Clarshack - just going through this process at the minute. Bought a site last year, and plans passed back in March, and currently have plans with a number of builders for pricing.
Material prices have increased significantly (even in the last year) - insulation certainly impacted by raw material shortage. GBP rate not helping the material prices, as raw material souring from outside UK. Added to that is the demand for good tradespeople in Greater Dublin, leading to a relative shortage in NI.
Our design isnt the traditional square build (less than 2,500sq ft though), but the architect was estimating a "live-in" price of somewhere between £90 - £100 per sq ft for a good finish, albeit that rate is dependent on what you spend on kitchens, bathrooms, landscaping etc.
To be honest I'm expecting builders prices + a slight uplift on some of their PC sums, to come in around  £110 per sq ft.

Architect and associated Fees, Electricity connection etc could easily add another £5 - £8 per sq ft to that, depending on how rural & complex the site is. We got an NIE quote of £10k for connection, but have spoken to people in more rural locations paying £15k - £18k.

I recently got my connection completed and as you have stated being in a rural area, my quote from NIE was actually over £10k.    However I was able to go another company who carried out the majority of the work.  They put up the poles and new transformer and laid the cable to my meter box.  I donít think many people factor this cost in when budgeting for a new build, certainly I hadnít considered it would cost me as much. 
 
I think this is a fairly new thing but they are definitely worth a call for a quote if nothing else.  I saved about 20% on my NIE quote, and found them very helpful throughout.
 
Here is a link to their site.
 
https://www.electricityworx.com
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: clarshack on August 21, 2019, 02:10:22 PM
If you are considering a build the only way to truly know, is to get the plans drawn up and get builders to price. You'll get anecdotal rate guidance like my estimates here, but every build and site are different.

I have plans drawn up. If anyone could pm me some reputable builders in the mid ulster area it would be very much appreciated.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: lfdown2 on August 21, 2019, 02:44:33 PM
I am just about to start a self build, long road ahead. Was wondering would anybody who has done similar recently have any supplier recommendations, I am particularly interested in the following;

- Structural steel
- Insulation (all Kingspan spec but wondering who is the alternative, at least to keep them honest)
- Doors & windows
- Roof slates
- Hollowcore flooring

Would be interested in price and service/quality recommendations.

I am in the south Down area but would give anyone a shout.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Stevie Nicks on August 21, 2019, 03:03:46 PM
I am just about to start a self build, long road ahead. Was wondering would anybody who has done similar recently have any supplier recommendations, I am particularly interested in the following;

- Structural steel
- Insulation (all Kingspan spec but wondering who is the alternative, at least to keep them honest)
- Doors & windows
- Roof slates
- Hollowcore flooring

Would be interested in price and service/quality recommendations.

I am in the south Down area but would give anyone a shout.

Quinntherm is a good alternative and should be a good bit cheaper, at least worth pricing against Kingspan!
For the slates contact Tegral/Capco and their reps will call out to site
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: andoireabu on September 10, 2019, 07:15:42 PM
Fitting a new kitchen in a house and the extractor hood is too far from the existing duct to put in new ducting to join into it. Can't punch a new hole in the wall so having to use a charcoal filter.  Anyone any experience of these?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: laceer on September 10, 2019, 08:56:16 PM
Buying a house off plan and starting to speak to contractor about finishes. What way are upgrades normally paid for, up front or on completion? Can they be added to mortgage and is there normally scope for bargaining? Any tips on buying in a new build development would be much appreciated.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Mike Tyson on September 10, 2019, 09:29:51 PM
Buying a house off plan and starting to speak to contractor about finishes. What way are upgrades normally paid for, up front or on completion? Can they be added to mortgage and is there normally scope for bargaining? Any tips on buying in a new build development would be much appreciated.

Going through the same myself. In our case, and from talking to others it seems to be standard across the board, the mortgage only covers the Ďbasicí package so to speak. Any upgrades - kitchen units, additional under-felt, larger tiles etc - at an additional cost are paid for on completion along with deposit via the solicitor. Weíve found with the developer there was zero scope for bargaining on any upgrades they were offering.

Our kitchen was through a third party who we had small scope for bargaining but only because we are spending a hefty enough amount with him. He was honest in our first meeting and said he didnít need to bargain as he had the contract for 80+ houses and knew we couldnít go elsewhere before completion. From talking to a kitchen fitter I know it would have worked out roughly the same price if we had got the basic kitchen and then post move in refitted our choices.

The majority of the time the developer has you over a barrel when it comes to upgrades, told us £45 for additional sockets anywhere in the house and £200 to get a socket on our kitchen island for example.

Any other questions, happy to help via reply or PM.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: laceer on September 10, 2019, 09:44:58 PM
Thanks - appreciate the response. We're meeting with contractor next week so compiling a list of questions. House isn't due to be started for another 6 weeks so we've a bit of time to suss things out.May take you up on that PM at some point!
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: blewuporstuffed on September 11, 2019, 04:08:25 PM
Has anyone installed a MHRV system in their house?
How do you find it? worth the money?
What type of heating system did you install alongside it?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: trueblue1234 on September 11, 2019, 04:16:17 PM
Has anyone installed a MHRV system in their house?
How do you find it? worth the money?
What type of heating system did you install alongside it?

Yeah we put one in. We were going close to a passive spec so windows didn't have trickle vents etc so MHRV was a must. It's one of those things that it's hard to notice what the difference is, but we have noticed less dust in the house than our previous one and my asthma hasn't been near as bad. Whether that's down to the MHRV or not I don't know. But as the house is airtight, we don't have any drafts and heating is minimal compared to previous house (Which was smaller).
We went for underfloor heating. EDIT* Sorry oil heating as well. We were going down the route of a Ground source heat pump before Arlene f**Ked it up on us.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: giveherlong on September 11, 2019, 04:35:37 PM
Has anyone installed a MHRV system in their house?
How do you find it? worth the money?
What type of heating system did you install alongside it?

Yeah. Great job. No 4 inch holes for extractor fans needed to be cored to outside of wet rooms.. Boost function to clear steam after a shower. No stale smells in house. Worth every penny
Went for the Vent axia unit. Oil and stove with back boiler combo heating system
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: blewuporstuffed on September 11, 2019, 08:40:34 PM
Has anyone installed a MHRV system in their house?
How do you find it? worth the money?
What type of heating system did you install alongside it?

Yeah. Great job. No 4 inch holes for extractor fans needed to be cored to outside of wet rooms.. Boost function to clear steam after a shower. No stale smells in house. Worth every penny
Went for the Vent axia unit. Oil and stove with back boiler combo heating system
rads or underfloor?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: giveherlong on September 11, 2019, 09:48:43 PM
Radiators
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: blewuporstuffed on September 12, 2019, 10:40:11 AM
I would be keen on MHRV, it just seems a minefield as to what heating system to pair along with it
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: giveherlong on September 12, 2019, 12:48:07 PM
I would be keen on MHRV, it just seems a minefield as to what heating system to pair along with it

You can use any heating system along with it. It doesn't affect it either way
You have to ventilate the house some way, either with trickle vents in windows and extractor fans in wet rooms
All houses now are trying to be as air tight as possible. Trickle vents and extractors have the opposite effect
MVHR extracts the stale air from your house and as this stale air is being removed it warms up the fresh air coming in.
Depending on the room, youíll have an extract or fresh air flow in the ceiling
Speak to Atlantic Air in Dunamore, Cookstown or Homecare in Donaghmore, Dungannon. Both recommended.
Email them your plans and theyíll price it up for you
http://www.atlanticairtesting.com/
https://www.homecaresystems.biz/about-us-mvhr-ventilation-installers-ni/
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: WT4E on January 06, 2020, 07:50:52 PM
Just wondering if anyone on here would have an idea of what a fully qualified and good rep architect would charge in fees for house from scratch 2700 sq foot for full job?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Ed Hardy on February 10, 2020, 06:07:58 PM
Anyone from the North any experience in claiming tax back from self build? Got the house signed off by building control February 2019, so was able to get the final draw of the mortgage just got it spent there before xmas so only getting around to claiming the tax now, says on the tax website returns should be filled in within 3 months of house being signed off, Ive never heard of this before, anyone shed any light on it?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: giveherlong on February 10, 2020, 09:59:27 PM
Anyone from the North any experience in claiming tax back from self build? Got the house signed off by building control February 2019, so was able to get the final draw of the mortgage just got it spent there before xmas so only getting around to claiming the tax now, says on the tax website returns should be filled in within 3 months of house being signed off, Ive never heard of this before, anyone shed any light on it?

From what you are saying you got full Building Control Approval Certificate issued in Feb 2019? Whatever document you are using as evidence of completion you have 3 months from document date to get your claim in. If your claim is late you need to send accompanying letter explaining delay. You have a couple of options here:

1 Send the letter explaining why late along with building control cert  as evidence
2 a letter from your bank or building society to certify last date the loan instalment was released
3 Rates District Valuer Certificate of valuation

I would go for option 2 if the rates crowd havenít been with you yet? All of the above is in the notes with the claim form on the website on pages 6-7.

The helpline number is on their website but donít mention you have full building control if going for option 2

Came across this site on another forum
Some good advice
https://www.vat431.co.uk/

Good luck with it as itís usually a tight sum of money and you donít want to be missing out
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Jim_Murphy_74 on February 10, 2020, 10:15:29 PM
If you are thinking of building in the south I would hold out for a free house from the Shinners.

/Jim.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Cavan19 on February 10, 2020, 10:58:09 PM
If you are thinking of building in the south I would hold out for a free house from the Shinners.

/Jim.

Yep Mary Lou is winding up the mixer it's out of diesel though so she just called slab to drop over some.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Ed Hardy on February 10, 2020, 11:03:12 PM
Anyone from the North any experience in claiming tax back from self build? Got the house signed off by building control February 2019, so was able to get the final draw of the mortgage just got it spent there before xmas so only getting around to claiming the tax now, says on the tax website returns should be filled in within 3 months of house being signed off, Ive never heard of this before, anyone shed any light on it?

From what you are saying you got full Building Control Approval Certificate issued in Feb 2019? Whatever document you are using as evidence of completion you have 3 months from document date to get your claim in. If your claim is late you need to send accompanying letter explaining delay. You have a couple of options here:

1 Send the letter explaining why late along with building control cert  as evidence
2 a letter from your bank or building society to certify last date the loan instalment was released
3 Rates District Valuer Certificate of valuation

I would go for option 2 if the rates crowd havenít been with you yet? All of the above is in the notes with the claim form on the website on pages 6-7.

The helpline number is on their website but donít mention you have full building control if going for option 2

Came across this site on another forum
Some good advice
https://www.vat431.co.uk/

Good luck with it as itís usually a tight sum of money and you donít want to be missing out

Thanks for the advice. Il contact them in the morning 1st thing.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: clarshack on February 11, 2020, 12:02:42 PM
if precast concrete foundation slabs were to be supplied and fitted for a self build, should the invoice be zero rated for VAT?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: Erne Man on February 11, 2020, 12:22:49 PM
Clarshack - my understanding is that if it is invoiced to your builder/contractor there will be VAT charged, but the builder wont pass the VAT onto you as it is a new build, and assuming the builder is VAT registered.
If the product is being invoiced to you, and is supply and fit by the manufacturer, my understanding is that they dont have to charge VAT, so long as they have your building control reference.
Our build is being managed by the contractor so all materials invoiced to him, but our gas fire supplier & installer who we are buying from directly, told me about the zero rated option.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: 93-DY-SAM on February 11, 2020, 12:59:36 PM
Clarshack - my understanding is that if it is invoiced to your builder/contractor there will be VAT charged, but the builder wont pass the VAT onto you as it is a new build, and assuming the builder is VAT registered.
If the product is being invoiced to you, and is supply and fit by the manufacturer, my understanding is that they dont have to charge VAT, so long as they have your building control reference.
Our build is being managed by the contractor so all materials invoiced to him, but our gas fire supplier & installer who we are buying from directly, told me about the zero rated option.

That's true if you have a contractor involved who is doing the work but if you are self building anything that is is supplied and fitted on site is zero vat rated. So if the guys doing your slabs fit them into place then they shouldn't charge you VAT. If they delivered them and left them beside the house for you to fit or someone else then they would have to charge you VAT.

Title: Re: building a house
Post by: clarshack on February 11, 2020, 02:38:07 PM
thanks.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: clarshack on February 25, 2020, 12:47:19 PM
anybody here used insulated pre-cast slabs. how does the insulation compare to traditional floor insulation?
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: giveherlong on February 25, 2020, 01:15:21 PM
anybody here used insulated pre-cast slabs. how does the insulation compare to traditional floor insulation?

Would depend on your heating system
Are you going underfloor? If so I wouldnít go near them as you would want the heat to immediately deflect upwards into your screed acting as thermal mass rather than heating extra concrete for no real reason?(you would be wasting energy heating the slab and have a slower response time)
Go with traditional pre stressed or precast. Get them to seal the cores. McGarritys or Spanwright would been keen
Put down your floor insulation and clip your UFH heating pipes to the insulation
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: clarshack on February 25, 2020, 07:37:23 PM
No not getting underfloor heating.
Title: Re: building a house
Post by: johnnycool on February 26, 2020, 01:31:05 PM
anybody here used insulated pre-cast slabs. how does the insulation compare to traditional floor insulation?

Would depend on your heating system
Are you going underfloor? If so I wouldnít go near them as you would want the heat to immediately deflect upwards into your screed acting as thermal mass rather than heating extra concrete for no real reason?(you would be wasting energy heating the slab and have a slower response time)
Go with traditional pre stressed or precast. Get them to seal the cores. McGarritys or Spanwright would been keen
Put down your floor insulation and clip your UFH heating pipes to the insulation

I ended up with 75mm of insulation below my UFH.

The newer screeds only need to be 50mm deep rather than the 100mm for a standard concrete screed..