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Messages - seafoid

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1
General discussion / Re: Nicest Towns in Ireland
« on: Today at 06:53:46 PM »
Ardara, Co. Donegal.

Hillsborough, Co. Down, black as it may be is a lovely, well kept town with some great spots for food and drink.
Presumably the use of the  word 'black' is a pejorative term.  What would the equivalent to this be on the opposite side of the coin?
Someone I know from Cavan wouldn't drink Lyons tea because it was a black Protestant tea.

I've absolutely no idea.

I'm sure you know full well that "black" being used in that particular context simply refers to a location as being overwhelmingly unionist or Protestant. A historically cold house for people of my ilk. Whether that's pejorative or not is a different question altogether.

2
I think this discussion shows how efficient partition has been in dividing the nation into 2 parts pretty much independent of each other.

3
Mayo are better than any team they'll meet in the QFs.

4
One or none is the logical bet.

Ian Burke is the only player who could be involved and he'll be most likely involved from the bench IMO. Brannigan's injury means that there is another spot probably open in the forwards for the Mayo match but Burke doesn't fit into Brannigan's role at all. Comer, McHugh (has not played championship yet but greatly improved from general play this year compared to 2017 league and is the most reliable free taker we have by a country mile) and Heaney are all certs to start in the forwards. Shane Walsh will surely get the nod as well after a reasonable game against Dublin. Daly and Armstrong will be pushing for a start, Varley has come in to finish a lot of games during the league as well.  There is also the possibility that KW will go for 3 midfielder players for a combo of Duggan/Cooke/Conroy with one of them named in the HF line as seen in the league final, so that's another spot gone maybe.
Personally I would like to see a Burke/Comer FF line from the get go as Burke is a skilful, unselfish player with superb vision who would compliment Comer very well but I can't see them lining out that way from the start.

You cannot jettison Lavelle - who performed very well in the league - for Power. His meltdown against the Rossies last year was a team failing. I've seen nearly every Galway league and championship match the past two years and I've said it here numerous times, the kick-out strategy as a whole is the problem regardless of whether you have Lavelle or Power in there.
I don't see Steede and Molloy near it for Mayo but moving forward who knows how they'll go within the group. The impact of the Corofin players could be minimal in May I think.
this year if they get to the Super 8 it will be more like a soccer tournament where squad depth is important. So there could be a few changes between May and later on

5
General discussion / Re: Death Notices
« on: Today at 09:40:56 AM »
I'll check out the book seafoid. I'd love to see the movie too but from looking it up there it won't be an easy one to get hold of.

"What I could do.

I could mend nets. Thatch a roof. Build stairs. Make a basket from reeds. Splint the leg of a cow. Cut turf. Build a wall. Go three rounds with Joe in the ring Da put up in the barn. I could dance sets. Read the sky. Make a barrel for mackerel. Mend roads. Make a boat. Stuff a saddle. Put a wheel on a cart. Strike a deal. Make a field. Work the swarth turner, the float and the thresher. I could read the sea. Shoot straight. Make a shoe. Shear sheep. Remember poems. Set potatoes. Plough and harrow. Read the wind. Tend bees. Bind wyndes. Make a coffin. Take a drink. I could frighten you with stories. I knew the song to sing to a cow when milking. I could play twenty-seven tunes on my accordion."

That’s very moving. I can see wearied eyes looking out from under the cardboard box as he says that. In his minds eye he can see the Atlantic battering the rocks around the Connemara coast. A swooping seagull and a distant boat. And then It drifts back to the rain and dank ness and darkness and loneliness of the street. Given the increasing numbers that are homeless you wonder how many have these moments of reflection.

A lot I'd say even if they can't always express it in words

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/timothy-o-grady-on-creating-i-could-read-the-sky-a-book-for-bealtaine-1.2216668

What I couldn’t do.

Eat a meal lacking potatoes. Trust banks. Wear a watch. Ask a woman to go for a walk. Work with drains or with objects smaller than a nail. Drive a motor car. Eat tomatoes. Remember the routes of buses. Wear a collar in comfort. Win at cards. Acknowledge the Queen. Abide loud voices. Perform the manners of greeting and leaving. Save money. Take pleasure in work carried out in a factory. Drink coffee. Look into a wound. Follow cricket. Understand the speech of a man from West Kerry. Wear boots or shoes made from rubber. Best PJ in an argument. Speak with men wearing collars. Stay afloat in water. Understand their jokes. Face the dentist. Kill a Sunday. Stop remembering.


6
How many Corofin lads are likely to feature the next day?

7
General discussion / Re: Death Notices
« on: Today at 09:25:26 AM »
Longford, Cavan and Monaghan seems to be the cowboy music heartland.

You forgot Tyrone.
Fermanagh is hardly much different..

Laythrum is great cowboys and heroes country too.

I like country music. It's all I ever heard on the radio growing up.
Mid and North-West Radio have a lot to answer for!

Not a massive fan of country music but he was well liked in these parts so it's sad to hear of his passing. RIP.
It's all Paul Claffey's fault.
Paul must play a Joe Dolan song every single day still.

So does Sean Coyle on Radio Ulster.
no harm
Joe Dolan was a superstar
Check out the comments on this video on YouTube and all the languages

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkLC2mj5wvE

EG
Sandra van Opbergen3 years ago

I get happy always from him..........

chanteau evelyne1 year ago

j'adore  Joe Dolan   merci


8
General discussion / Re: Syria
« on: Today at 08:12:53 AM »
One aspect of the Syrian war that doesn't get enough attention is  climate change. Syria is in large part desert apart from the strip around the coast inland as far as Damascus.  Syria doesnt have a lot of water. In the east there is the Euphrates river but Turkey has built dams upstream.

The population grew a lot post WW2.  The education system is poor so young men don't have many skills. And kids need to be fed. So a lot of marginal land was brought into use in order to keep pace with population growth .  Between 1988 and 2014 the population increased by 70%.
It is not that different to Connacht in the  early 1840s in fact.

The Euphrates isn't what it used to be and climate change introduced desertification which banjaxed a lot of marginal land. Subsistence farmers started to move to the cities- Aleppo and Damascus-especially poor areas such as Ghouta - and people felt they had nothing to lose and started agitating for change.

The bIg question is how many people Syria can support.
It is very easy to increase a population but very hard to decrease it back to a stable level when food production goes into crisis.
In Ireland in the 1840s the Brits chose a Famine . The cultural repercussions are still visible. Famine and war are Traumas.  After the Famine the age of marriage rose drastically and sexual relations between men and women were policed by the wider society. Any activity that might threaten the food supply was shunned. 

Syria is next door to Israel so there is no  way it'll be allowed to run a couple of decades of political experimention to come up with something that might work. Egypt also borders Israel and the model there is brutal repression and stagnation

Ireland was treated similarly in the 19th century because of its strategic location between England and the US. There was no way the Fenians were going to get control.

The brutality of the war is trauma. Syria is working its way to a new equilibrium. It was just as bad in Connacht or West Cork in the 1840s. It doesn't really matter whether people die by hunger or by being bombed.
There is no groovy way to do it.

9
General discussion / Re: Death Notices
« on: Today at 07:21:34 AM »
I'll check out the book seafoid. I'd love to see the movie too but from looking it up there it won't be an easy one to get hold of.

"What I could do.

I could mend nets. Thatch a roof. Build stairs. Make a basket from reeds. Splint the leg of a cow. Cut turf. Build a wall. Go three rounds with Joe in the ring Da put up in the barn. I could dance sets. Read the sky. Make a barrel for mackerel. Mend roads. Make a boat. Stuff a saddle. Put a wheel on a cart. Strike a deal. Make a field. Work the swarth turner, the float and the thresher. I could read the sea. Shoot straight. Make a shoe. Shear sheep. Remember poems. Set potatoes. Plough and harrow. Read the wind. Tend bees. Bind wyndes. Make a coffin. Take a drink. I could frighten you with stories. I knew the song to sing to a cow when milking. I could play twenty-seven tunes on my accordion."


10
General discussion / Re: Nicest Towns in Ireland
« on: Today at 06:27:33 AM »
Shannonbridge in Offaly has a fantastic pub beside a canal and is close to Clonmacnoise. It is like an antidote to Dublin. Clifden is like that as well.

11
General discussion / Re: Death Notices
« on: Today at 06:23:40 AM »
Big Tom's death and the reaction to it are like evidence of a tribe that has often been ignored. There was an article in the Irish Times about 400,000 people who emigrated between 51 and 61 before secondary education. Ireland didnt want them. But the country and Irish bands played to them all over England. I used to meet a few ould lads from that generation at a homeless shelter in London. They would always be talking about home. I can imagine the buzz when the musicians rolled up.
Were you working there seafoid? Not being nosey but it sounds genuinely interesting.
Did you see that movie "Kings" with Colm Meaney that’s partly done in Irish and based on the play "Kings of Kilburn Road"? Bleak but very powerful and moving.
The Jimmy McCarthy song "Missing You" made famous by Christy Moore would have been about that tribe as well I suppose. McAlpine's fusiliers too. They were probably remembered more in song than in any other way.
I was just volunteering once a week , Asal.
There was a drop -in centre where the people would be given tea and sandwiches donated by the City sandwich shops at closing time.

I met one lovely man from Williamstown in East Galway who was alcoholic and homeless so he could never go home. We used to talk about football. One day he said that someone had told him that there were houses now in Willamstown from the church as far as the crossroads. He hadn't been back for 40 years. 

The people were either Irish/Scottish rural alcoholics or English working class. There was a huge difference between the 2 groups. The English were conditioned to believe they were useless and deserved nothing better.  One fella told me proudly that his family was scum. The Irish people would never say that.
 
Did you ever read the book " I could read the sky" ? There was also a film with a soundtrack by Iarla O lionaird.   It is one of my favourite books.

https://youtu.be/r7bfQjEpoLQ
This song us from the film.
The line ""I am in England now" is haunting.
 .

12
17 wides in Tuam also but a lot were under pressure and at time P Joyce hadnt the composure developed for intercounty freetaking either......Lohan that year was the most composed freetaker imaginable but our genius of a manager felt everything had to go through Eddie, esp the replay and one thing about Eddie he wasnt was anyways decisive or fast so we lost a lot of threat.........

When O'Domhnaill scored from under the cusack vs Derry in the semi I decided galway would win the all ireland

I got dumped by the manager for my troubles as i was too "player friendly and listened to players opinions too much" and gays managerial careeer spiralled in one way only afterwards also ( not claiming the credit for that by the way)

Ros had the makings of a good team in those years but it was Galway who kicked on and sucked up all the oxygen. I suppose O Mahony was a better manager .
But there was a lot of luck too. And there was a fragility about Galway in 98 that the all Ireland does tend to gloss over.
Also you did need very high standards in Connacht to bring Sam back thar Sionna. If the 3 counties were all shite nothing would happen.

13
General discussion / Re: Death Notices
« on: April 18, 2018, 10:51:20 PM »
Big Tom's death and the reaction to it are like evidence of a tribe that has often been ignored. There was an article in the Irish Times about 400,000 people who emigrated between 51 and 61 before secondary education. Ireland didnt want them. But the country and Irish bands played to them all over England. I used to meet a few ould lads from that generation at a homeless shelter in London. They would always be talking about home. I can imagine the buzz when the musicians rolled up.

14
General discussion / Re: Syria
« on: April 18, 2018, 10:42:33 PM »
In every conflict there are 2 different ‘truths’. Each side has their own ‘truth’. It happened here for years in NI. I saw it at first hand. The propaganda machine of Assad and the western powers are in full flow. I would believe Robert Fisk, as I’ve read and listened to him an awful lot over the years and he comes across as a well versed and intelligent man who doesn’t cow down to MSM tactics. That doesn’t mean that everything he writes is absolutely correct but I give him a lot of credence. The reality is that there is an agenda here....presumably oil....and the only real winners will be the corporates in the oil and arms industry.

Syria doesn't have much oïl
Russia wants to keep its base in Tartus which gives it access to the Med.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_naval_facility_in_Tartus

Iran wants to consolidate Shia power. Hezbollah are Lebansese Shia and Assad's sect is effectively Shia.
The Christians in Syria do not want Sunni rule.
The Sunnis are a mess (ISIS etc)

I’m has some levels of oil and is apparently one of the larger oil countries in the Middle East but it is a key strategic point for oil and gas pipelines. Like all countries in the area there are plenty of religious disputes but at the abckmofmit all these disputes are flames at this stage in history purely for economic reasons. The US and Russia would not be interested in this area unless there were financial or strategic benefits in it.
Syria is 59th
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_oil_production

I think this is more geopolitical than anything else
US power is fading. Russia is messing. Iran is consolidating what it achieved in Iraq.

15
General discussion / Re: Syria
« on: April 18, 2018, 09:15:36 PM »
In every conflict there are 2 different ‘truths’. Each side has their own ‘truth’. It happened here for years in NI. I saw it at first hand. The propaganda machine of Assad and the western powers are in full flow. I would believe Robert Fisk, as I’ve read and listened to him an awful lot over the years and he comes across as a well versed and intelligent man who doesn’t cow down to MSM tactics. That doesn’t mean that everything he writes is absolutely correct but I give him a lot of credence. The reality is that there is an agenda here....presumably oil....and the only real winners will be the corporates in the oil and arms industry.

Syria doesn't have much oïl
Russia wants to keep its base in Tartus which gives it access to the Med.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_naval_facility_in_Tartus

Iran wants to consolidate Shia power. Hezbollah are Lebansese Shia and Assad's sect is effectively Shia.
The Christians in Syria do not want Sunni rule.
The Sunnis are a mess (ISIS etc)

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