Author Topic: Brexit.  (Read 318625 times)

seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #4710 on: October 18, 2018, 10:19:07 AM »
Really on the ball :

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/blog/live/2018/oct/17/brexit-eu-summit-may-pmqs-corbyn-blair-heseltine-and-clegg-urge-eu-leaders-to-extend-article-50-to-allow-2nd-referendum-politics-live

"Today there will be no breakthrough," said Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaite. She added that 28 months after the Brexit referendum, in June 2016, London had still not explained clearly how it wants to leave the EU.
"Today, we do not know what they want. They do not know themselves what they really want. That is the problem," the Lithuanian president told reporters.

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Orior

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #4711 on: October 18, 2018, 02:03:16 PM »
Jim Allister complains that Europe are attempting to divide and rule the UK.

https://twitter.com/JimAllister/status/1052884002590351360

Yet not so long ago that is exactly what England did on Ireland.
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seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #4712 on: October 18, 2018, 03:45:45 PM »
The Unionists are holding England to ransom in 2018 having held Ireland to ransom in 1920 and having plunged northern Ireland into hell in 1969.  There seems to be a pattern.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/blog/live/2018/oct/18/brexit-may-faces-angry-backlash-from-mps-over-proposals-for-transition-and-meaningful-vote-politics-live

The Eurasia Group, a consultancy that that has been producing well-regarded briefings on Brexit, thinks that the chances of a no deal Brexit, although still quite small, have gone up. Mujtaba Rahman, a former European commission official who runs its Europe division, says in a note released today that the odds of the UK leaving without a deal are now at 20%. He says:
A grubby Brexit deal, albeit delayed, is still our base case (45% probability).
However, in recognition of the structural impasse between the two sides over the Irish border, EU negotiators’ deep negativity about the status of the talks, the ticking clock and stepped-up preparations for no-deal planning, we are increasing the odds of a cliff-edge exit from 15% to 20%.
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Ronnie

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #4713 on: October 18, 2018, 11:11:59 PM »
The Executive Formation and Exercise of Functions Bill.   In view of the anti-brexit alliance (SF,SDLP,Alliance and Greens) telling the EU that they don’t want Stormont to have the powers to work out trade arrangements (because they don’t trust the DUP) what’s the point in trying to fire this legislation through?  How can the British Government possibly cobble together an executive when it’s coming up on 2 yrs since people last voted?  In light of RHI have the DUP lost some of its arrogance and confidence?  It doesn’t look like it to me.

GJL

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #4714 on: October 18, 2018, 11:14:52 PM »
Can someone explain to me how extending the exit period helps solve any problems?

Rossfan

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #4715 on: October 18, 2018, 11:22:16 PM »
Prevents a "hard border" in Ireland till the next British General Election?
2018- 2 Cupeens won, 2 to go.

Ronnie

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #4716 on: October 18, 2018, 11:25:00 PM »
“It kicks it down the road” is the phrase that’s been used all week.  Ken Clarke on Newsnight last night said 1 more year doesn’t really make any difference because trade deals take 6,7,10 years to agree anyhow.   Northern Ireland had 50 odd years of ‘status quo’.   Delay, delay, delay seems to be Govt policy at the minute.  So if brushing it under the carpet is an acceptable policy then, hey, it solves everything.

mouview

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #4717 on: October 18, 2018, 11:36:01 PM »
Can someone explain to me how extending the exit period helps solve any problems?

Mooting this certainly hasn't solved any for Teresa May; quite the opposite, it has united practically all Tories against her. May may certainly be incompetent but nobody could play the hand of cards she's been dealt. She's probably never been in greater peril than now at home, but Brexiteer/ERG gang haven't the numbers to topple her and Remainers don't know who to replace her with as it would probably be pro-Brexit such as Davis, Johnson, Rees-Mogg. DUP daren't pull the rug from under her and cause a GE as they'd almost certainly lose their current influence (and some seats) and it may allow their bete noire Corbyn into no. 10. I think it's almost inevitable there'll be some form of delay or extended transition now.

Whatever outcome results, the whole farrago has been a Rubicon of sorts, a political Vietnam. It will cause divisions for years to come, and even should the UK Remain, exit thoughts will never be too far away, fomented by it's supporters. There'd probably be another referendum in 20/25 years time.

seafoid

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Re: Brexit.
« Reply #4718 on: Today at 05:08:54 AM »
Can someone explain to me how extending the exit period helps solve any problems?

https://youtu.be/pACePi441ds

The way to do Brexit was develop a policy, get the party united  behind it and win a general election on it.
They won a wafer thin margin in a referendum. Brexit means Brexit because they couldn’t agree what
Brexit meant. They still can’t.

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