Author Topic: How the north/Northern Ireland differs from England, Scotland and Wales  (Read 1880 times)

brokencrossbar1

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Re: How the north/Northern Ireland differs from England, Scotland and Wales
« Reply #30 on: December 10, 2017, 10:34:16 AM »
They put a soda farl in the Ulster Fry. Just a different breed, altogether.

And the brits add baked beans. Disgusting!

I do both.....what am I?

BennyCake

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Re: How the north/Northern Ireland differs from England, Scotland and Wales
« Reply #31 on: December 10, 2017, 10:44:37 AM »
They put a soda farl in the Ulster Fry. Just a different breed, altogether.

And the brits add baked beans. Disgusting!

You're right. Pure disgusting.

Orior

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Re: How the north/Northern Ireland differs from England, Scotland and Wales
« Reply #32 on: December 10, 2017, 01:11:36 PM »
They put a soda farl in the Ulster Fry. Just a different breed, altogether.

And the brits add baked beans. Disgusting!

I do both.....what am I?

Greedy bollix?
Cover me in chocolate and feed me to the lesbians

seafoid

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Re: How the north/Northern Ireland differs from England, Scotland and Wales
« Reply #33 on: December 10, 2017, 01:20:23 PM »
It is acceptable to have an Irish identity in England

Scottish and Welsh MPs go to Westminster to work, not to arse lick
« Last Edit: December 10, 2017, 02:57:37 PM by seafoid »
Jaysus would you shtop

redcard

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Re: How the north/Northern Ireland differs from England, Scotland and Wales
« Reply #34 on: December 16, 2017, 09:41:39 PM »
Differences in Northern Ireland legislation compared with Great Britain.
• Unique legislation in Northern Ireland
• Duplicate Orders in Council
• Different infrastructure
• Different court system
• Industrial Tribunals (IT) as opposed to Employment Tribunals (ET) in GB
• Appeal from IT by way of Court of Appeal in NI in GB appeal from and ET to
an Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) and then the Court of Appeal.

Quasi Autonomous Non-Government Organisation operating in Northern
Ireland (QUANGO’s)

Labour Relations Agency (LRA in GB ACAS) formed in 1976. Its purpose to
promote ‘good industrial relations’
Human Rights Commission established under the NI Act 1998 in March 1999
Health and Safety Executive comprises former Health and Safety Agency and Health
and Safety Inspectorate. Its aim is to promote ‘health , safety and welfare at work’.
Equality Commission (EC) one ‘super’ agency established October 1999 (brainchild
of the late Dr Mo Marjorie Mowlam former Sec of State for NI). Formerly in NI there
were separate equality commissions for Fair Employment (perceived religious belief
or political opinion), Sex Discrimination and discrimination on the grounds of
disability. GB (The Equal Opportunities Commission) The EC in Northern Ireland
embraces the following:-
• Racial Equality
• Equal Opportunities
• Fair Employment
• Disability Discrimination

ziggy90

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Re: How the north/Northern Ireland differs from England, Scotland and Wales
« Reply #35 on: December 17, 2017, 09:35:41 AM »
They put a soda farl in the Ulster Fry. Just a different breed, altogether.

And the brits add baked beans. Disgusting!

I do both.....what am I?

Do you have tinned tomatoes too? If so you're a Brummie.
Questions that shouldn't be asked shouldn't be answered

redcard

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Re: How the north/Northern Ireland differs from England, Scotland and Wales
« Reply #36 on: December 17, 2017, 11:51:26 AM »
Change to law on gambling in Northern Ireland – What are the odds?

September 27, 2016
Advances in technology and changing social trends have seen certain forms of gambling increase in popularity as they have become more accessible to the general public. Gambling is a transferred matter for the purposes of the NI Act 1998 and is currently regulated in Northern Ireland by The Betting, Gaming, Lotteries and Amusements (Northern Ireland) Order 1985. This legislation has proved increasingly inflexible and overly restrictive in the face of developments in the gambling market. As a result, there have been calls to modernise the law and align regulation with that in place in the rest of the UK. Indeed, in 2011, a public consultation was undertaken to seek views on possible changes to the current gambling law.  A total of 239 responses were received to the consultation including the views of 44 organisations with a general recognition that the law was overly restrictive and in need of modernisation.

In updating the law, it will be necessary to achieve a balance between easing current restrictions on the industry, thereby widening the scope of the market in Northern Ireland, but also minimise the potential negative consequences of gambling and ensure fairness in the industry. Proposed changes include the enactment of a new offence making it illegal for under 18’s to use gambling machines as well as the requirement that a bookmaker’s bet constitutes an enforceable contract as opposed to merely ‘a gentleman’s agreement’. Under the current law in NI, prize draws which do not depend on a ‘substantial’ degree of skill are prohibited unless they are free to enter. The replacement legislation may well seek to redefine the boundary between what constitutes legal activity generating revenue and what amounts to an illegal lottery by removing the requirement that the degree of skill exercised be substantial.  This will allow players in Northern Ireland to compete in the same competitions as other UK residents.

At present, in the betting sector in Northern Ireland there are: approximately 330 licensed bookmaking offices; two horse racing tracks; two dog racing tracks and around 40 commercial bingo clubs. However, one of the largest entertainment companies in Europe, The Rank Group, have so far been unable to expand into Northern Ireland because of the tighter legal restrictions here compared to the rest of the UK. However the present blanket prohibition on casinos in Northern Ireland looks set to stay eliciting criticism that Belfast is the only major UK city without the choice as to whether such development may be licensed. Change to Northern Ireland’s gambling legislation may not come as soon as many would hope, as any draft legislation will have to go through a lengthy process of scrutiny before it completes its passage through the assembly.

http://www.cfrlaw.co.uk/article/change-to-law-on-gambling-in-northern-ireland-what-are-the-odds/

redcard

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Re: How the north/Northern Ireland differs from England, Scotland and Wales
« Reply #37 on: February 05, 2018, 11:16:41 AM »
Your car can’t  be clamped on private property in England and Wales but it can be in the north

There are no National Parks in the North either.